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Reverse sear question

Hi, everyone.  This is my first post on the forum, as I've recently been approved.  I'm a newbie to the BGE, and I'm working with a still-relatively-new Large.  I've done a few cooks - pork shoulder, packer brisket, spatchcock chicken, and ribs - and everything's turned out great so far, thanks to all the good advice on this forum.

Tonight, I'd like to do steaks.  We have a couple dry-aged NY strips, and I'd like to reverse sear them.  There seem to be several different setups for this, but as I don't yet have a spider to set a grate below the fire ring (the method that seems to be favored for the high-temp finishing sear), I was thinking of doing it this way:

Plate setter, drip pan with liquid (suggestions welcome - I saw someone added wine and spices to the pan but did not necessarily derive any benefit from it), cast iron grate.  Egg at 275ish until steaks reach 120, then foil steaks, remove pan and plate setter, throw open vents, preheat cast iron grate, sear for 2 minutes, flip, same, foil.

Any thoughts on whether I'm heading in the right direction?  Thanks in advance.

[Northern] Virginia is for [meat] lovers.

Comments

  • Also, here's a picture of the sliced flat of the packer brisket I did, just because.
    Canon Evan 05-11-2013 011.JPG
    3648 x 2736 - 5M

    [Northern] Virginia is for [meat] lovers.
  • I just did steaks on Saturday and this was the exact way I did 'em except for the wet drip pan, I just foiled the plate setter; these should turn out great!
  • Thanks, @CigarSmokinEgger!  Much obliged.

    [Northern] Virginia is for [meat] lovers.
  • SkiddymarkerSkiddymarker Posts: 5,397
    edited May 2013
    Do you have two grids?
    If so, here is what I suggest:
    Fill the fire box and half way up the fire ring with good sized lump. 
    Light as if for low and slow. Get stable to 250-300. 
    Cast Iron grid on the fire ring. 
    Setter, legs up on the CI grid (I space with a couple of tile strips to make it easier to grab and remove the setter later)
    No drip pan, no liquid required, optional if you like it. 
    Regular grid on the setter. 
    When you are ready, drop your steaks on. Cook to 110-115 internal, remove, loose foil to keep warm. 
    Remove everything except the CI grid, open up the vents. 
    When dome gets up to 500+, paper towel the steak surface to dry, drop the steaks back on, 30 to 90 seconds a side, depending on final temp. 
    This will give some grid lines for show or if the fire is really hot, brown the whole surface. 
    Oh, forgot - Welcome to the forum, good luck!
    Delta B.C. - Vee-Gan: old Indian word for poor hunter. 
  • SmokeyPittSmokeyPitt Posts: 4,564
    I think any of those methods will work fine. I have done wine in a pan and I do think it adds a hint of flavor.  The downside to extra liquid is it will give you some steam and you might not get as good of a crust.  I would try it again sometime but wouldn't go out of my way...or waste good wine :).  I happened to have a half bottle from the night before when I did it.  In my house, a half empty bottle means it wasn't good :P

    I really like Skiddy's suggestion if you have 2 grids.  Put the CI under the plate setter and let it start heating up.  



    Which came first the chicken or the egg?  I egged the chicken and then I ate his leg. 
  • EggcelsiorEggcelsior Posts: 8,254
    +1 on Skiddymarker

    What is your finishing target? You are going to get a 10-15 degree rise with the sear and rest. I usually pull at 110-115 for medium rare.
  • @Skiddymarker, the two grid idea sounds perfect (and faster than dropping the CI grate after the initial indirect).  I think I'll do that.  And thanks for the welcome - I'm glad to be here!

    @SmokeyPitt - your house sounds like my house.  Thanks for the advice re: liquid.  I think I'll forgo it this time and aim for a better crust.

    [Northern] Virginia is for [meat] lovers.
  • @Eggcelsior - target is rare side of medium rare, so roughly 130.  I like to err on the side of rare with steaks, so I'll revise my pull temp downward.  Thanks!

    [Northern] Virginia is for [meat] lovers.
  • SkiddymarkerSkiddymarker Posts: 5,397
    I think any of those methods will work fine. I have done wine in a pan and I do think it adds a hint of flavor.  The downside to extra liquid is it will give you some steam and you might not get as good of a crust.  I would try it again sometime but wouldn't go out of my way...or waste good wine :).  I happened to have a half bottle from the night before when I did it.  In my house, a half empty bottle means it wasn't good :P



    @SmokeyPitt is right on - the low temps used in the indirect cook will allow the meat to take on both smoke from the lump and flavor from steam pan and rub. Much different than a Trex hot sear and cook. A steam pan does make a difference, not my favorite, but some folks love it.
    Also, dry the surface of the "cooked" steaks before the sear, they sear much faster without overcooking the interior.  
    Delta B.C. - Vee-Gan: old Indian word for poor hunter. 
  • FoghornFoghorn Posts: 1,481

    @Eggcelsior - target is rare side of medium rare, so roughly 130.  I like to err on the side of rare with steaks, so I'll revise my pull temp downward.  Thanks!

    That will serve you well. I usually plan to pull 20 degrees below my target temp and have never regretted it. I came to that after overcooking some great cuts of meat. Spare yourself the misfortune and learn from my mistakes. That is the beauty of this forum.

    XL BGE, Klose BYC, ProQ Excel, Weber Kettle, Firepit, Grand Turbo gasser, and a portable Outdoor Gourmet gasser for tailgating

    San Antonio, TX

  • My wife, who went to culinary school after college, deemed these the best steaks ever.  Thanks for all your advice - pics to follow.

    [Northern] Virginia is for [meat] lovers.
  • OK, so maybe one pic to follow.  Here's the finished product.image
    Canon Evan 5-13-2013 038.JPG
    3648 x 2736 - 4M

    [Northern] Virginia is for [meat] lovers.
  • FoghornFoghorn Posts: 1,481

    Outstanding!

    Now you have the curse of your wife having high expectations every time you cook her a steak. 

    Good luck with that.

    :))

    XL BGE, Klose BYC, ProQ Excel, Weber Kettle, Firepit, Grand Turbo gasser, and a portable Outdoor Gourmet gasser for tailgating

    San Antonio, TX

  • lousubcaplousubcap Posts: 4,753
    Welcome aboard-great start!  As you know the BGE is a game changer.
    Louisville
  • SkiddymarkerSkiddymarker Posts: 5,397
    @SaturdayFatterday - nice cook, that's the way we like our steaks. Many folks like a completely browned exterior, almost a bark or crust that is rich with flavor. Just not what we prefer. 
    SWMBO likes her steak a little more well done and the reverse sear is perfect as hers just goes on the indirect 10 minutes before mine. Both steaks look the same on the outside when seared. At most steakhouses, if she orders a medium well it arrives looking like a piece of lump, not good. 
    Delta B.C. - Vee-Gan: old Indian word for poor hunter. 
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