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How long to cure fresh apple wood?

Does anyone know how long wood should cure before it is ready to use for smoking. I have access to more apple branches than I could ever use. Also, do I need to take the bark off before I use it? Thanjs.

Comments

  • Your question is not an easy one to answer. The easy answer is that you should stack and cure until it's dry! But how long it takes depends on how you stack and the average relative humidity. Wood will cure MUCH faster in Colorado where the relative humidity is low than it will dry in Houston where the relative humidity is quite high. Also, stack your wood so that each piece has optimal airflow in and around the stack, usually a cross-cross pattern. A good average would be 3-6 months. As for bark, I'm decidedly not a fan of smoking wood having bark. I feel bark adds a harsher flavor than no bark. This is because bark has chemicals to protect the tree from all manner of insects, etc that the wood itself doesn't. So, I debark when I use wood. I wish you well in all your cooks!
  • jerrypjerryp Posts: 226

    Your question is not an easy one to answer. The easy answer is that you should stack and cure until it's dry! But how long it takes depends on how you stack and the average relative humidity. Wood will cure MUCH faster in Colorado where the relative humidity is low than it will dry in Houston where the relative humidity is quite high. Also, stack your wood so that each piece has optimal airflow in and around the stack, usually a cross-cross pattern. A good average would be 3-6 months. As for bark, I'm decidedly not a fan of smoking wood having bark. I feel bark adds a harsher flavor than no bark. This is because bark has chemicals to protect the tree from all manner of insects, etc that the wood itself doesn't. So, I debark when I use wood. I wish you well in all your cooks!

    Thanks. I live in central PA and the humidity is quite low in the winter. The branches where cut off about 3 months ago.
  • ChubbsChubbs Posts: 3,632
    If you have an endless supply, try burning some and see how it burns and smokes.
    Columbia, SC --- LBGE 2011 -- MINI BGE 2013
  • FockerFocker Posts: 1,626

    Here in the midwest, seasoning means 4 seasons...1 year. 

     

    "Our houses are protected by the Good Lord and a gun.
     And you might meet 'em both if you show up here not welcome son."--Josh Thompson

    Brandon
    Quad Cities


  • Great questions, were you reading my mind? I posted something similar a while back. I am in the same boat as you , I have access to peach tree branches/trimmings up the street at an orchard. Also they have apple and nectarine trees. I was also wondering about the bark. There are piles of branches there that were cut a few years ago, so I think they should be good. Can't wait till I can get up there to get some.
  • fairchasefairchase Posts: 202
    edited February 2013
    Green wood smokes just fine , and green fruit wood actually imparts a slightly sweeter taste than when seasoned. ( I think )
  • SkiddymarkerSkiddymarker Posts: 6,084
    edited February 2013
    fairchase said:
    Green wood smokes just fine , and green fruit wood actually imparts a slightly sweeter taste than when seasoned. ( I think )
    Yes - if you are burning the wood in a fireplace, it needs to be seasoned, if you are using it for smoke wood, the bark is good and it is ready as soon as it hits the ground. 
    Delta B.C. - Vee-Gan: old Indian word for poor hunter. 
  • vidalia1vidalia1 Posts: 7,091
    FTYI...Myron Mixon only uses fresh cut peach wood...never dried...so try the fresh apple..you just may like it.
  • gerhardkgerhardk Posts: 786
    edited February 2013
    I think you should kiln dry it and then soak it for 48 hours before use ;)

    Gerhard

    Seriously it just struck me as humorous that lots of people are concerned that their wood is so dry that it burn to quick and you were concerned it was too wet.  I think what is important though is that you keep it off the ground with good air circulation if you are storing it for a longer period this is to prevent mould and fungus from growing on it.
  • boatbumboatbum Posts: 1,273

    I did some "just trimmed" from the tree peach wood in Jan - thought it worked well.

    Had seasoned for about 48 hours.

    Cookin in Texas
  • shtgunal3shtgunal3 Posts: 2,815
    Throw it on the fire, it will cure as it burns. :D

    ___________________________________

     

     LBGE,SBGE, and a mini makes three......Sweet home Alabama........ Stay thirsty my friends .

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