Big Green Egg - EGGhead Forum - The Ultimate Cooking Experience...
We hope you all got to celebrate those tasty food holidays last week, we sure enjoyed them! We are even more excited about the beginning of fall, for so many reasons, but mainly for experiencing the cool, crisp air while being outside cooking up the best recipes the season has to offer. We especially love these Beer Pork Tenderloin and Ground Beef Acorn Squash recipes! Fall is upon us, and it's a great time for getting out to one of the many #EGGfests around the country - see a list here

I've never done a prime rib on the egg, any reason this wouldn't work?

Fellas, looking for a little help here and ideas.  What I thought I'd do is pick up a 7-8 pound rib, coat it with olive oil, smother it with something like a Montreal Steak Seasoning, heat the egg up to around 250, put the plate setter in with a pan on top of it to catch the drippings, slow cook that sucker to about a 125 IT, wrap it in foil for 20-30 minutes then cut it.  Any reason this wouldn't work????  BTW, any ideas who long to smoke it?  Like I said, never done one.  Thanks!

Comments

  • That's almost exactly how Dr. BBQ does it.

    __________________________________________

    Dripping Springs, Texas.
    Gateway to the Hill Country

  • henapplehenapple Posts: 11,364
    I used a mustard/shire rub last time...great crust.
    Green egg, dead animal and alcohol. The "Boro".. TN 
  • That's almost exactly how Dr. BBQ does it.

    Appreciate the link.  I believe I'll raise the heat up to 325 or 350 and go from there.  
  • I have done them before.  They always come out juicy and very tasty.  I spike it with garlic cloves, I rub it down with DP Swamp Venom and then I lay strips of Applewood Smoked bacon across the top held in palce by toothpicks on eahc end.  I fire the egg and cook at 325 until 130 IT, Pull and rest 20 minutes.  I also use a chunk of Hickory with the lump which happens to be Kroger at this time.  It's so good that the neighbors line up and beg to chew on the fat cap.
  • I've never heard of DP Swamp Venom.  Can you give me some idea of what it's like?  Like the idea with bacon and could easily add that to it. 
  • egretegret Posts: 3,999
    That is one of the great products from the Dizzy Pig Company.......here is more info on it : http://www.dizzypigbbq.com/HTMLrubs/swampvenom.html

    Personally, I would use the DP Cowlick Steak rub on the prime rib. When I do a prime rib, I put it in at 500* and begin ramping the temp down to about 325* till about 120* internal. This puts a nice sear on it!
    image
  • U_tardedU_tarded Posts: 1,193
    Sear for crust/color, gets the malliard effect going which in as simple as I can put it is a reaction to heat in the proteins of the meat which is why we sear steaks vs just a low slow roast
  • egretegret Posts: 3,999
    Why do I need a sear on it?
    Searing puts a  nice crust and caramelizes the sugars on the surface of the meat! This is desirable in most quarters........what searing doesn't do is seal in the juices. This is a myth.......
    image
  • egret said:

    Personally, I would use the DP Cowlick Steak rub on the prime rib. When I do a prime rib, I put it in at 500* and begin ramping the temp down to about 325* till about 120* internal. This puts a nice sear on it!
    I have only done two Prime Ribs and this is the method I used.  Both were incredibly good.  I did one for visiting friends. One of them liked the results and how the egg performed so much he bought a LBGE the following week!
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    Welcome to the Swamp.....GO GATORS!!!!
  • Two basic methods, sear first, high temp 500-600, then slow roast or start low as you describe take it close to final, pull it, heat the egg, then sear for look and crust. 

    I prefer what you describe, except I pull at 120, let it sit till the lump is roaring, then sear for color.
    Most prime rib restaurants use a low and slow. 
    Delta B.C. - Vee-Gan: old Indian word for poor hunter. 
  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 11,388
    Prime ribs are thick roasts.  Restaurants cook them slow and slow - 225F or so.  The low cook gives a nice even rare/medium rare throughout the roast.  Cooking hot gives you a well done "rind" with much less cooked core.  moisture loss isn't a problem since done is in the low 100s.  Generally the outside of the roast were you'd normally have a crust or bark isn't a big feature....much of the outside is fat and gristle.  
    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.
    Large and Medium BGE, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.
    New Orleans, LA - we know how to eat 

  • jfm0830jfm0830 Posts: 882
    edited December 2012
    This may be sacrilege to suggest this here....

    When I got my barrel smoker 7 years ago I switched to doing my PRs at 225. They seemed to come out juicer than when I cooked them at 325-350 on the gas grill. The recipe I used from the Virtual Weber Bullet website had you heat your oven to 500 and pop the PR in the oven for 7-10 minutes when you took it off the smoker. For me I found 8 minutes was a bout perfect. 

    For my first PR on the Egg this year I am going to try that method. I definitely want to do low and slow again. But even though the Egg can get up to 500 degrees fairly quickly, it will never be faster than a waiting pre-heated oven. Plus I don't think it will taste any different after 8 minutes on the Egg vs 8 minutes in my oven. I do hope several hours low and slow on the Egg vs my smoker will result in an even juicier PR this year.

    Jim
    BBQ Website: grillin' & smokin'

    Middlesex County, MA
    Three Large BGE's & Too Many Eggcessories to Count
  • One last question and I appreciate each and every reply and that's on of the main reasons I love this forum.  How long do you think it would take to smoke a 7 pound rib, with a plate setter going at about 250?  Is this a closer to a 2 hour or a 4 hour process?

    BTW, found my seasoning I'm going to use.  Got some Molasses Bacon rub I've used before and I bet it would be great on the prime rib.

  • jfm0830jfm0830 Posts: 882
    When I did PR on my smoker at 225 it used to consistently be between 25 and 30 minutes a pound. So at 225 you'd be looking at about 3 1/2 hours. At the higher temperature I'm guessing it would be 2 3/4 to 3 hours. But that's just a guess that's not based on Eggsperience. The egg may cook faster due to the better seal.
    BBQ Website: grillin' & smokin'

    Middlesex County, MA
    Three Large BGE's & Too Many Eggcessories to Count
  • DonWWDonWW Posts: 253
    Boarcephus,  I have a pretty recent post on doing a rib roast.  Your method should definitely work.  I am more experienced at roasting at 325-350, which still produces a great roast.  Timing at this temp is about 15 minutes/lb.  At 225-250, I think jfm0830 is right.  My experience is that it typically takes a little less time than anticipated.  Take the roast out of the fridge 3 hours before cooking to get it up to room temp.  Have fun - this is a great cook!
    XL BGE.  Dallas, Texas.
  • iMHO, a 7 rib roast will cook in the same time as a 4 rib roast. The roast is basically the same thickness, it is not a cube of meat. PR keeps very well in a warm oven, so if it is done early it is possible to hold it. For the 7# you note, 225 grid temp, it will be done in 2 1/2 hours. 

    @jfm0830 - Rather than use your oven, I use a set-up with my CI grid on the fire ring, setter legs up, drip pan, SS grid at the felt line. Cook until internal is 115-120, pull, foil and sit for 10 minutes or so. The egg is hot and the CI grid is really hot, it has been between the lump and the setter. I sear for color. You can serve almost right away if you want, as it has already rested. 
    Delta B.C. - Vee-Gan: old Indian word for poor hunter. 
  • robnybbqrobnybbq Posts: 1,536
    I am planning on cooking a prime rib for Xmas.  4 people will eat it med-rare thee way it should be eaten.  However my wife will not eat any meat unless its well done or almost well done. 

    What should I do for this?  Cook it the to med-rare (130ish) and cut her piece off and put it back on the egg to cook it more?

    _______________________________________________________________
    LBGE, Adjustable Rig, Spider, High-Que grate, maverick ET-732, Thermapen,


    Garnerville, NY
  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 11,388
    Yes - cut an end and throw it back on the egg to destroy, I mean, cook well done, or cook it further in a pan of au jus on the stove top.
    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.
    Large and Medium BGE, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.
    New Orleans, LA - we know how to eat 

  • EggcelsiorEggcelsior Posts: 8,873
    robnybbq said:
    I am planning on cooking a prime rib for Xmas.  4 people will eat it med-rare thee way it should be eaten.  However my wife will not eat any meat unless its well done or almost well done. 

    What should I do for this?  Cook it the to med-rare (130ish) and cut her piece off and put it back on the egg to cook it more?
    That or cut her piece off and finish it in some jus on the stove.
Sign In or Register to comment.