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Wood Question

Skydogg41Skydogg41 Posts: 17
edited September 2012 in EggHead Forum
Normally I use chips.  I bought some Hickory chunks and were going to use those tomorrow to smoke a Butt.  How many chunks should I throw on the fire for a 6lb Butt?  I also have some apple chips.  Can you combine two types of wood or is that a bad idea?
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Comments

  • I would probably use 4 or 5 chunks for that cook. You can definitely mix woods, but I'm not sure the hickory/apple mixture is worth it. Hickory has a much stronger flavor than apple and would overpower. Try the apple by itself sometime... it's great with pork.
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  • Thanks

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  • Pecan is also a great smoke for pork. A little milder than hickory and possibly apple. For my 250 reverse flow that eats wood splits only, I normally use a mixture of pecan, hickory and oak.... Gives butts and whole hogs a nice smoke.
    Evans, GA - 250 Reverse Flow (trailer), Large BGE, custom built cedar table (by me). When in doubt, smoke it.
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  • Not quite on topic but I find this helps on the wood side.
    My actuary says I'm dead.
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  • I'm a cherry mix with apple kinda guy.
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  • TjcoleyTjcoley Posts: 3,422
    Not quite on topic but I find this helps on the wood side.
    Great chart and great info
    __________________________________________
    It's not a science, it's an art. And it's flawed.
    - Camp Hill, PA
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  • I would only use 3 big chunks but everyone like different amounts of smoke.
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  • Bayside...great chart.!!! Thanks for sharing
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  • carter422 said:
    I'm a cherry mix with apple kinda guy.
    +1, except hold the cherry - in other words give me apple, neat!
    Delta B.C. - Vee-Gan: old Indian word for poor hunter. 
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  • I put two sticks in my cook and it was a bit too strong. The pieces were about 10 inches long and 1 inch in diameter. Just cut them off the tree a few days earlier.
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  • I put two sticks in my cook and it was a bit too strong. The pieces were about 10 inches long and 1 inch in diameter. Just cut them off the tree a few days earlier.
    What kind of wood?  I like apple like Skids.

    ........................................................................................

    Flint, Michigan.  Named the most dangerous city in America by the F.B.I. three years running.

    We invented the U.A.W. and carjacking!

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  • gte1gte1 Posts: 376
    If you want to mix hickory with fruit wood do it 3 or4/1 fruit/hickory.
    George
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  • Sorry. Hickory.
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  • Not quite on topic but I find this helps on the wood side.

    That's a cool chart Bayside. You should start a thread with that so it is easily searchable

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  • I agree. Great chart bayside.
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  • SMITTYtheSMOKERSMITTYtheSMOKER Posts: 2,317
    edited September 2012

    We use 1-2 fist sized chunks per cook.   A small butt could easily be done with 1 chunk. IMO

     

    Hickory is traditional BBQ smoke, we like cherry for color on the butts...gives the bark a nice mahogany appearance.

     

    Cedar is listed as a "Do not use" wood, what about all the cedar planked recipes?

     

    -SMITTY     

    from SANTA CLARA, CA

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  • We use 1-2 fist sized chunks per cook.   A small butt could easily be done with 1 chunk. IMO

     

    Hickory is traditional BBQ smoke, we like cherry for color on the butts...gives the bark a nice mahogany appearance.

     

    Cedar is listed as a "Do not use" wood, what about all the cedar planked recipes?

    The comment regarding cedar is curious, I've used cedar chunks for years with great results.  Goes particularly well with chicken and also sausage.  It is very light (weight wise) wood, almost feels weightless and burns up pretty quickly, but does impart great flavor.  For butts, cherry is fantastic
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  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 14,055
    Black forest ham is smoked with fir brush.
    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.
    Large and Medium BGE, Kamado Joe Jr., smoker with a 5k btu AC, gas grill, fire pit, pack of angry cats, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.
    New Orleans, LA - we know how to eat 

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  • SkiddymarkerSkiddymarker Posts: 6,862
    edited September 2012
    Living on the "wet" coast of BC, cedar is plentiful and a nuisance. I really wished I liked it to smoke with (I have a whole yard full of it) but I don't. Cedar plank salmon is, to me, more of an elegant method to cook and serve, but I really do not notice any difference in taste from using a stainless basket. That could be due to the herbs and spice used, which simply overpowers the effect of the wood. Planking with cedar has very little smoke, well at least the way I do it, the wood (untreated red cedar heavy shake) chars a bit, but never seems to smoke. 
    Delta B.C. - Vee-Gan: old Indian word for poor hunter. 
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  • henapplehenapple Posts: 14,263
    You're cooking on cedar...not smoking with it.
    Green egg, dead animal and alcohol. The "Boro".. TN 
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  •  the cedar I've referred to above isn't being used as a plank, they're standard chunks tossed into the fire.  They aren't red however, it's white cedar.  I haven't seen red in chunk form used for smoking so I'm not sure if/how that would work
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