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Brisket for first cook?

acracr Posts: 27
edited March 2012 in EggHead Forum
Is a beef brisket too risky a cook for my first cook on the BGE?

I don't even have the egg yet, getting it today (or tomorrow) but would love to use it for easter dinner.  A brisket would be awesome, but is it too risky?  Any tips for a noob?

Comments

  • tazcrashtazcrash Posts: 1,769
    ok, I haven't done a brisket yet. but as a new noob myself... 

    Don't over think it,
    Give the egg the time to stabilize it's temperature, don't rush it!
    Try not to peek

    Don't sweat it. It's easier to cook good tasting food on this thing that I thought before.  

    Good luck





    Bx - > NJ ->TX!!! 
    All to get cheaper brisket! 
  • eggnitedeggnited Posts: 94
    At Eggfest it was mentioned that new eggs are notorious for being all over the place with regard to temps and briskets are not the best for first cooks. As a newbie myself I think it's unnecessary....maybe even inadvisable to start with a brisket. Like others here said to me when I asked....take it easy the first time out...do easy/short cooks to play with your egg and get used to adjusting temps. I think that was and is good advice. FWIW
  • boatbumboatbum Posts: 1,261

    There is a ton of good advice on here.    Also - check out Playing with Smoke and Fire website ( google it - it will show up).

     

    Cookin in Texas
  • Hillbilly-HightechHillbilly-Hightech Posts: 966
    edited March 2012
    At Eggfest it was mentioned that new eggs are notorious for being all over the place with regard to temps and briskets are not the best for first cooks.
    I don't really think it's new "Eggs" but rather new "Eggheads" who are notorious for being all over the place w/ regard to temps ;-)

    I think a new Egg can hold a consistent temp just as well as a "broken in" Egg - IF you know what you're doing ;-)

    With that being said, my advice is similar - get a "feel" for how the Egg works - it's NOT like a traditional grill. In fact, for MOST things (aside from searing), you actually leave the lid down (someone has a signature which is "if you're lookin, you ain't cookin") - and that is correct - the "magic" of the Egg is its incredible ability to hold & maintain a consistent temperature for HOURS on end w/out having to go out & keep shoveling in the lump or fussing w/ the vents.

    If you keep opening the lid, you're introducing new air (and that new air is colder than the air inside the Egg) - so you've just affected the temp in at least 2 ways, which will show up in a fluctuation in the dome thermometer reading.

    Get a feel for how your top & bottom vent settings affect temp, how long it takes changes in those settings to affect the temp, and really try to get a handle on learning how to "dial in" the settings such that the temp lands where you want it, as opposed to overshooting it then panicking & closing off the vents, then getting it too low, then getting into the cycle of "chasing" the temps up & down...

    Once you master temp control (and learning to cook to temp, and not time), you are most of the way there, my friend!!!

    Best of luck!!
    Don't get set into one form, adapt it and build your own, and let it grow, be like water. Empty your mind, be formless, shapeless — like water. Now you put water in a cup, it becomes the cup... Now water can flow or it can crash. Be water, my friend. - Bruce Lee
  • Village IdiotVillage Idiot Posts: 6,947
    Only a true TEXAN would want to make his first cook a brisket.   :))

    I would highly suggest getting your heat control down first.  It will come very quickly.  Generally, people recommend starting with something that is relatively forgiving, such as chicken or pork tenderloin.  Briskets can be frustrating, even for a seasoned cook.  

    Good luck and take pictures.
    __________________________________________

    Dripping Springs, Texas.
    Gateway to the Hill Country

  • MickeyMickey Posts: 14,483
    Brisket is not a food to learn on. It is not easy nor forgiving. As Gary said in the post above this one: Briskets can be frustrating, even for a seasoned cook.
    Salado TX Egg Family: 2 Large and a very well used Mini.... 5th Salado EggFest is March 14, 2015

  • R2Egg2QR2Egg2Q Posts: 1,598
    I would advise Not doing brisket as a first cook for the reasons listed above. The advice on learning your Egg first is sound. If you have your heart set on a long cook a pork shoulder is much more forgiving.
    XL, Large, Small, Mini Eggs
    Bay Area, CA
  • gerhardkgerhardk Posts: 781
    My first cook I did ribs (the 3, 2, 1 method), actually bought the ribs on the way to pick up the egg. They turned out great and to be honest I don't think we have had a bad meal from the egg yet, some were better than others but all good.

    Gerhard
  • acracr Posts: 27
    Good points all round guys, thanks.   Maybe I'll start with burgers or chicken, something basic.

    Now I just need to decide on something easy to cook for easter dinner, you know I'll have to use the egg!


  • travisstricktravisstrick Posts: 4,436
    I disagree with most on this. In my experience, brisket is very easy if you do the following:
    1. Buy a quality piece of meat.
    2. Keep the calibrated dome temp between 225-400 degrees. (I do 300)
    3. Pull the meat at 205 internal temp.

    Be careful, man! I've got a beverage here.
  • ShiffShiff Posts: 1,131
    In my experience Brisket should be removed when it is tender and this usually happens when the internal temperature is between 185 and 205 degrees.  Use a fork to test for tenderness.

    Personally, I wouldn't do a Brisket first, but you do have some time before Easter to cook a Spatchcock Chicken which I think is very easy and produces an excellent dinner.  Read through the forum here for some other ideas for easy cooks.  If you get good results, then try a brisket.

    Two great sources of brisket cooking information (when you are ready) are:

    http://playingwithfireandsmoke.blogspot.com/1996/03/brisket.html

    and

    http://bubbatim.com/Bubba_s_Brisket.php


    Barry Lancaster, PA
  • cortguitarmancortguitarman Posts: 1,988
    It isn't a hard cook, but it is hard to judge time. I've done 1 brisket and it was done in 4 hours. I planned on a 9 hour cook. Luckily it was delicious.
    Mark Annville, PA
  • GatoGato Posts: 766
    I would not worry about it being your first cook. I would worry about it being your first brisket if you are serving it for Easter dinner.
    Geaux Tigers!!!
  • brisket is not a good idea for Easter if it's your first (or 10th cook). It took me years to get consistent results with brisket. I would do a killer brisket then invite 15 people over then next week to show off and it wouldn't turn out the same. They all turn out now but brisket is by far the most finicky cut to get right.If you are bent on smoking something, do a pork shoulder. Keep the dome temp between 225-250 and pull it when internal temp reaches 190-200. Pork shoulder is much easier to get consistent results and it's much easier to keep warm to feed a large group. Once you cut a brisket, the clock is ticking- it does not keep warm or reheat as well as pork shoulder so you really have to have everything timed perfectly to get the best results. Another thing to note about brisket, if you have never carved one, it can be daunting too. I would practice on several before making a holiday meal out of it. Pulled pork....well, you just take 2 forks and shred it up. Good luck and let us know how it goes.

  • Village IdiotVillage Idiot Posts: 6,947
    I disagree with most on this. In my experience, brisket is very easy if you do the following:
    1. Buy a quality piece of meat.
    2. Keep the calibrated dome temp between 225-400 degrees. (I do 300)
    3. Pull the meat at 205 internal temp.

    No wonder he likes it.  That is the recipe for MRE's.
    __________________________________________

    Dripping Springs, Texas.
    Gateway to the Hill Country

  • MickeyMickey Posts: 14,483
    Gary be nice to :ar!
    Salado TX Egg Family: 2 Large and a very well used Mini.... 5th Salado EggFest is March 14, 2015

  • joe@bgejoe@bge Posts: 394
    I disagree with most on this. In my experience, brisket is very easy if you do the following: 1. Buy a quality piece of meat. 2. Keep the calibrated dome temp between 225-400 degrees. (I do 300) 3. Pull the meat at 205 internal temp.
    I would tend to agree - once you have a good handle on how to control temps in the Egg and you buy quality meat - success is almost guaranteed.  Although I would have to say that folks opinion of a 'perfect' brisket cook vary widely as compared to other cuts.

  • I would advise Not doing brisket as a first cook for the reasons listed above. The advice on learning your Egg first is sound. If you have your heart set on a long cook a pork shoulder is much more forgiving.
    Amen on pork shoulder being much more forgiving! I love Brisket (it's my fave bbq) but I usually do shoulder for parties or big cooks because they are so much easier to do consistently perfect. I would never discourage anyone from getting after a brisket. It's the most rewarding because when you nail it, nothing is finer. I was just saying for a first cook, pulled pork it it a tall order. I do a couple a month and will gladly share my setup if you want to give it a go. 

  • Another thought- go grab a brisket this weekend and practice. If you nail it, then do it for Easter. I used to do pulled pork and brisket every other weekend for practice until I figured it all out.  I would just take it to the fire station to feed to fellas if I wasn't having people over to eat it (I have a good buddy who is a fireman). They were always very happy to see me, even when it wasn't perfect (That's what sauce is for!) Practice makes perfect so I say Go For It. Let me know if you need or want any set up tips (I've done well over 100 briskets on my egg and have it down the way I like it (TX Style- dry rubbed, lots of bark, lots of smoke, and never mopped or sauced until eaten). There are tons of great recipes out there and techniques too. Time to jump in and get your feet wet!

    I would advise Not doing brisket as a first cook for the reasons listed above. The advice on learning your Egg first is sound. If you have your heart set on a long cook a pork shoulder is much more forgiving.
    Amen on pork shoulder being much more forgiving! I love Brisket (it's my fave bbq) but I usually do shoulder for parties or big cooks because they are so much easier to do consistently perfect. I would never discourage anyone from getting after a brisket. It's the most rewarding because when you nail it, nothing is finer. I was just saying for a first cook, pulled pork it it a tall order. I do a couple a month and will gladly share my setup if you want to give it a go. 


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