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Anyone ever cooked venison on their egg

DeckchefDeckchef Posts: 40
edited February 2012 in EggHead Forum
Just wondering how it was cooked and how it turned out ??
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Comments

  • LowflyerLowflyer Posts: 766
    I did venison burgers (newbie here) at too high of heat (500). They were seared and tasty, but next time I will back it down to about 350 and slow done the cook time.
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  • hogaholichogaholic Posts: 225
    edited February 2012
    All the time. 

    I take ground venison and mix with some ground beef, wochestershire, a beaten egg per pound of meat, breadcrumbs and whatever seasoning I am into that night.  Press into 1/4 to 1/3 lb burgers and cook to about medium on the flat side of the cast iron grate over a hot fire (450-550 dome.

    I also cook a lot of whole tenderloin.  Marinade in whatever you wish, season like you want, just don't cook beyond medium rare.  The only way to screw this up is to overcook it.  Pull at about 125-130
    Jackson, Tennessee. VFL (Vol for Life)
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  • Thanks for the input , I'm supposed to be getting a shoulder roast from a coworker soon
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  • I used to get the shoulder roasts, steaks, etc.  My son and I take 3-5 deer a year and we now get them processed into just ground meat and tenderloin.  I don't mess with the roasts anymore because I couldn't get them tender enough to be very good (pre-egg days however).

    I would suggest marinating and seasoning the heck out of that roast and cook it indirect for a long time.  Remember, venison is very lean so it tends to dry out.  You may want to consider injecting it with something, coating it in mustard and, when that cooks off, basting it with a sauce to keep it moist.

    Good luck
    Jackson, Tennessee. VFL (Vol for Life)
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  • gdenbygdenby Posts: 4,567
    hogaholic has some good suggestions. Many marinades have a good bit of oil in them, and the coating helps the tough meat retain moisture.

    You might make a fake fat cap from bacon. Or just smear extra butter, lard, suet on top of the venison.

    As an aside, specially to those of you out there who do cook with venison. Nobody talks about venison stock. Nobody says, "I had a bunch of deer ribs left, so I decided to make some stock."  Is this something that does happen, or are there great piles of deer bones tossed without making stock? Or, is their some problem? Deer bones maybe make nasty stock? Or just too watery to bother with. Any rate, anyone have a comment?
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  • Sorry gdenby - I haven't made a stock with venison.  I have collected the juice from cooked but resting tenderloins and added that to a deglazed pan sauce.  That was pretty good stuff.
    Jackson, Tennessee. VFL (Vol for Life)
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  • IrishDevlIrishDevl Posts: 1,390
    Deckchef - If you like jerky, you may want to consider with some of your shoulder.  I did a piece (cut into jerky pieces and marinaded) on the egg (160 degrees) and it came out great.  Some tough critics gave very high marks.    
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  • Love homemade deer jerky !
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  • RenoReno Posts: 12
    I take the backstraps and cut them into strips. Marinate in Alergro for 2 days. Take cream cheese and a jalapeno and roll that up with bacon. It will set you free.
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  • gdenbygdenby Posts: 4,567
    Sorry gdenby - I haven't made a stock with venison.  I have collected the juice from cooked but resting tenderloins and added that to a deglazed pan sauce.  That was pretty good stuff.
    Y'know, venison stock might be a whole new category of good. While I spent most of my life pitching roasted beef and chicken bones, I wouldn't think of it now. It is so easy to boil the flavor out of those, and make the best soups, stews, and mashes. No one ever says "I had the best venison barley soup yesterday." I wonder if that is just an oversight? Save them marrow bones for the finest game soup.
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  • fishlessmanfishlessman Posts: 17,270
    Sorry gdenby - I haven't made a stock with venison.  I have collected the juice from cooked but resting tenderloins and added that to a deglazed pan sauce.  That was pretty good stuff.


    Y'know, venison stock might be a whole new category of good. While I spent most of my life pitching roasted beef and chicken bones, I wouldn't think of it now. It is so easy to boil the flavor out of those, and make the best soups, stews, and mashes. No one ever says "I had the best venison barley soup yesterday." I wonder if that is just an oversight? Save them marrow bones for the finest game soup.

    i would think it would be good. made some gravey with lamb drippings awhile back, thought the whole time it would have that fatty sour mutton flavor, instead it was one of the best graveys ive ever made, very rich and tasty
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