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Sous Vide Brisket Round 3

Hey guys, I'd like your opinion on a sous vide brisket.  This is my 3rd attempt at it .  The first time I sous vide it at 150 for 48 hours and smoked it at 250 for about 4 hours.  I wasn't really sure what the internal temp was but pulled it based on color and it was really good but crumbled when I tried to cut it.  My second brisket was sous vide at 135 for 48 hours wrapped it in butcher paper and smoked at 225 to 250 for 4 hours and it almost looked raw when I pulled it.  We were going to a party and had to finish it there in the oven... talk about embarrassing!  What internal temp should I wrap and pull this next brisket at? I plan to sous vide it at 135 for 48 hours then smoke it at 250 until done.  Thanks in advance!

Comments

  • I'd like to add it'll probably be a 12 to 15 lb packer.
  • LitLit Posts: 7,063
    I have not done a brisket in a sous vide but you can't go by color of the meat. Was the brisket that looked raw tender? I sous vide pork tenderloins all the time at 145 then sear them and they are over 150 IT and they are pink still inside but they are fully cooked and really tender.
  • I agree but people in general have an idea of what a brisket should look like and if it doesn't look like it they won't eat it.
  • jtcBoyntonjtcBoynton Posts: 2,224
    The internal temp should be whatever you sous vide it at.  Smoking is just for adding a layer of smoke flavor, not additional cooking.

    If the crowd wants a traditional looking brisket, some suggest 176°F for 24 hours.  For a 48 hour sous vide, 135 to 150ºF will work. It will be done.  You didn't need to finish it in the oven - it was done - just not like traditional brisket.

    A cook for 24 to 36 hours at 155°F might just be what you are looking for. Its a good place to start. 
    Southeast Florida - LBGE
    In cooking, often we implement steps for which we have no explanations other than ‘that’s what everybody else does’ or ‘that’s what I have been told.’  Dare to think for yourself.
     
  • Matt LopezMatt Lopez Posts: 18
    edited November 2017
    Thank you all... I ended up getting a 12 lb prime because it was on sale... should I still pull it from the smoke at 155 and should I wrap it?
  • Thanks heavy, that was a great article! I've bookmarked it for future reference! 
  • posterposter Posts: 566
    I did one at 155 for 36 hours, pulled and let it cool in fridge a bit while I got egg going then dried it off re-seasoned and smoked for 3 hours. It was great and had a bark, if you want a smoke ring a little cure in the bag well in the sous vide will create one . I also gave it a rest in the cooler a solid hour after smoking. Pretty much the serious eats version shown above
  • posterposter Posts: 566
    edited November 2017

    Ya, notes. Something I'm learning that is very important. Many times I've nailed a cook then forget what I did different the next time. I've been using Dropbox to store everything that way I can get to it wherever I am

  • WebassWebass Posts: 155

    Lenoir City, TN -  Bama fan in Tenn Vol's backyard. 

    LBGE, Weber Spirit 

  • Webass said:
    Worth checking out for the rub recipe alone, which is phenomenal.
    "If the world is something you accept rather than interpret, then you're susceptible to the influence of charismatic idiots." - NdGT

    "I've made a note never to piss you two off." - Stike


  • Matt LopezMatt Lopez Posts: 18
    edited November 2017
    Photo Egg said:
    Honestly, don't book mark the article, "follow it". You have 2 failed briskets playing with SV, why go for #3?
    Follow it to the T and see how you like it. Then make changes one at a time.
    SV cooks your brisket. Smoking before or after only adds smoke flavor and color. A higher heat smoke at the end will also firm up your brisket and give it some outer crust.
    Wrapping brisket is a method to used to speed up a cook or to limit the crust/color during the cook. Neither should come into play with a SV cook.
    Keep good notes! 
    Hey Photo, I've got it in the sous vide around 6 AM this morning at 135 and plan to smoke it on Sat.  Should I bump the temp to 155 when I get home later today or should I leave it?  The article did mention a sous vide at 135 for >= 36hrs was a  good temp also.

  • posterposter Posts: 566
    Hey Photo, I've got it in the sous vide around 6 AM this morning at 135 and plan to smoke it on Sat.  Should I bump the temp to 155 when I get home later today or should I leave it?  The article did mention a sous vide at 135 for >= 36hrs was a  good temp also.

    depends on the texture you want
  • poster said:

    depends on the texture you want

    I'm looking for a traditional texture with a good pull and bend.

  • Photo EggPhoto Egg Posts: 8,376
    Photo Egg said:
    Honestly, don't book mark the article, "follow it". You have 2 failed briskets playing with SV, why go for #3?
    Follow it to the T and see how you like it. Then make changes one at a time.
    SV cooks your brisket. Smoking before or after only adds smoke flavor and color. A higher heat smoke at the end will also firm up your brisket and give it some outer crust.
    Wrapping brisket is a method to used to speed up a cook or to limit the crust/color during the cook. Neither should come into play with a SV cook.
    Keep good notes! 
    Hey Photo, I've got it in the sous vide around 6 AM this morning at 135 and plan to smoke it on Sat.  Should I bump the temp to 155 when I get home later today or should I leave it?  The article did mention a sous vide at 135 for >= 36hrs was a  good temp also.

    Like @poster said...and the article poster above. Your choice. But for a more traditional brisket texture it states 155. 
    Just read the article and follow the directions.


    "Set your precision cooker to 135°F (57°C) for brisket with a tender, steak-like texture, or 155°F (68°C) for more traditionally textured brisket that falls apart when you pull at it. Add brisket to water bath and cover it with a lid, aluminum foil, or table tennis balls. Cook for 24 to 36 hours at 155°F or 36 to 72 hours at 135°F. Allow cooked brisket to cool at least to room temperature before proceeding (an ice bath can speed up this process). Brisket can be stored in the refrigerator at this stage for up to 1 week before finishing."
    Thank you,
    Darian

    Galveston Texas
  • I plan to push it to 155 tonight and pull it after 24 hours then smoke it for 3 hours at 300.  Do you think having it in the bath at 135 now will hurt the texture at all?
  • Photo EggPhoto Egg Posts: 8,376
    I plan to push it to 155 tonight and pull it after 24 hours then smoke it for 3 hours at 300.  Do you think having it in the bath at 135 now will hurt the texture at all?
    At this point I would probably just plan on making Brisket Chili. :)
    I have no idea Matt. Again, it depends on what you are wanting as your final product. Lower temps make it more steak like and higher temps break down the meat more for a traditional brisket texture.
    Thank you,
    Darian

    Galveston Texas
  • posterposter Posts: 566
    I plan to push it to 155 tonight and pull it after 24 hours then smoke it for 3 hours at 300.  Do you think having it in the bath at 135 now will hurt the texture at all?

    likely not, It probably took a good chunk of time to get up to your lower temp anyways. Maybe just add a little more time at the end if you are worried about it at all. I don't think you could go too long unless your past 48 hours 
  • calikingcaliking Posts: 11,763
    I did 2 SV briskets for eggfests this year. One was done at 152 x 36hrs (Salado, brisket nihari) the other was done at 147 x 24hrs (Space City, brisket rendang). They were chilled, then finished on the BGE at 250°F x 2-3hrs. 

    I can't remember which one was better, but I do remember being pretty happy with how both turned out. 

    #1 LBGE December 2012 • #2 SBGE February  2013 • #3 Mini May 2013
    A happy BGE family in Houston, TX.
  • DoubleEggerDoubleEgger Posts: 13,506
    Photo Egg said:
    Thanks heavy, that was a great article! I've bookmarked it for future reference! 
    Honestly, don't book mark the article, "follow it". You have 2 failed briskets playing with SV, why go for #3?

    I'd be missing out on a lot of good things in life if I quit after only two failed attempts. 
  • Photo EggPhoto Egg Posts: 8,376
    Photo Egg said:
    Thanks heavy, that was a great article! I've bookmarked it for future reference! 
    Honestly, don't book mark the article, "follow it". You have 2 failed briskets playing with SV, why go for #3?

    I'd be missing out on a lot of good things in life if I quit after only two failed attempts. 
    YOU would not have 2 failed attempts on a cook like this and still be seeking basic info because you would have researched and found some answers before you started. If you are talking out of the context of this post, I agree. We have all had fails.
    Thank you,
    Darian

    Galveston Texas
  • FATC1TYFATC1TY Posts: 841
    Sounds like over complication...

    just smoke the brisket traditionally and you have.... a traditional brisket. 

    -FATC1TY
    Grillin' and Brewing in Atlanta
    LBGE
    MiniMax
  • Quick update... I came home and raised the sous vide temp to 155 for about 26 hours then placed it in the fridge over night.  Smoked it with pecan and cherry chips for about 3.5 hrs at 250 and it came out freaking delicious.  I've smoked dozens of briskets traditionally but I'm always looking to improve my bbq game.  Thank you all for the suggestions, even the condensing ones... This was a really good brisket, not my best but it was up there.  
  • I’m preparing to put a 10-pound brisket in a 155-degree bath this evening. Something I’ve not been able to reason: When we cook a brisket on the Egg, the internal temp of the meat that most shoot for is in the 205-degree neighborhood. Obviously, with the sous vide water temp in the 140 to 155 range, the meat temp won’t get close to 205, even after 3 hours or so on the Egg to finish it (at least I don’t think it will). 

    So my question: Does the fact that brisket will cook at that lower temperature for so long result in the target temp of the meat not needing to be as high as when the brisket is done completely on the Egg?

    Rob

    Columbus, Ohio

  • RaymontRaymont Posts: 697
    I’m preparing to put a 10-pound brisket in a 155-degree bath this evening. Something I’ve not been able to reason: When we cook a brisket on the Egg, the internal temp of the meat that most shoot for is in the 205-degree neighborhood. Obviously, with the sous vide water temp in the 140 to 155 range, the meat temp won’t get close to 205, even after 3 hours or so on the Egg to finish it (at least I don’t think it will). 

    So my question: Does the fact that brisket will cook at that lower temperature for so long result in the target temp of the meat not needing to be as high as when the brisket is done completely on the Egg?
    Correct. The SV at 155 breaks down the muscle (making it tender) over a long time period vs. traditional cook you are taking up to 190-205 to breakdown those same fibers. 

    Small & Large BGE

    Nashville, TN

  • CTMikeCTMike Posts: 1,830
    edited November 2017
    I agree but people in general have an idea of what a brisket should look like and if it doesn't look like it they won't eat it.
    People in general are morons.
    That's an insult to morons everywhere. 
    MMBGE / Large BGE / XL BGE (Craigslist Find) / SF30x80 cabinet trailer - "Ol' Mortimer" / Outdoor kitchen in progress.  

    Southeastern CT. 
  • Photo EggPhoto Egg Posts: 8,376
    Webass said:
    Worth checking out for the rub recipe alone, which is phenomenal.
    That rub looks fantastic as does the color, crust and smoke ring. But there is no sign of moisture in the final product sliced photos.
    Thank you,
    Darian

    Galveston Texas
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