Big Green Egg - EGGhead Forum - The Ultimate Cooking Experience...
Welcome to the EGGhead Forum - a great place to visit and packed with tips and EGGspert advice! You can also join the conversation and get more information and amazing kamado recipes by following Big Green Egg at:

Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Instagram  |  Pinterest  |  Youtube  |  Vimeo
Share your photos by tagging us and using the hashtag #EGGhead4Life.


In Atlanta? Come visit Big Green Egg headquarters, including our retail showroom, the History of the EGG Museum and Culinary Center!  3786 DeKalb Technology Parkway, Atlanta, GA 30340.

standing rib roast (6 or 7 bone)

phsphs Posts: 2
edited July 2012 in Beef
need help on time and temp.  Want bone cut just enough so each guest gets meat and bone together.  (newbie)

Comments

  • lousubcaplousubcap Posts: 16,532

    Here's a thread from earlier today for info-

     Enjoy!

    Louisville;  L & S BGEs, PBC, Lang 36; Burnin' wood in the neighbourhood. # 38 for the win.  Life is too short for light/lite beer.  
  • I did a bone in prime rib last weekend for the first tiime (5 ribs). It was great. I seared it at 500 degrees on all sides. Took it off the egg and let the temp drop to 300 (dome) and put it back on. I took it off 127 degrees internal and let it sit for 20 minutes. It was closer to medium Vs rare. It cooked faster than I expected 3 hours or so if I recollect and the meat was 9.75Lbs. Everyone raved about it and this was not an easy crowd.
  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 26,391
    I worked in a restaurant that had prime rib on the menu.  We'd salt and pepper them and throw them in at 220F.  That's how I've been cooking them ever since.  If you do I high temp cook, you risk a "gradient" of temperatures in the meat.  The meat around the outside might be medium to medium well, with a medium rare eye.  Also, higher temp cooking gives you a higher "rise" during rest.  Cooks Illustrated experimented with different temperatures and concluded 220F was ideal for a standing rib  roast.
    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.  Love me or hate me, I am forum Marmite.
    Large and Medium BGE, Kamado Joe Jr, Akorn Jr, smoker with a 5k btu AC, gas grill, fire pit, pack of angry cats, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.  Registered republican.
    New Orleans, LA - we know how to eat 

  • need help on time and temp.  Want bone cut just enough so each guest gets meat and bone together.  (newbie)
    The only method I use is low and slow for rib roasts. 200* to 250*. The end result is an even colour right through the cross-section.
  • Found a pic

  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 26,391
    That looks effin' delicious!
    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.  Love me or hate me, I am forum Marmite.
    Large and Medium BGE, Kamado Joe Jr, Akorn Jr, smoker with a 5k btu AC, gas grill, fire pit, pack of angry cats, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.  Registered republican.
    New Orleans, LA - we know how to eat 

  • Little StevenLittle Steven Posts: 28,817
    That looks effin' delicious!
    Thanks, funny thing is that was probably done to 145* internal

    Steve 

    Caledon, ON

     

  • phsphs Posts: 2
    Try Thirdeye's Cookin'
    thanks for the tip. good info
  • phsphs Posts: 2
    thanks for all the info, will make sure have plenty of pics when our heat wave breaks and can git eggin

  • ccpoulin1ccpoulin1 Posts: 390
    I always buy bone in ribeye, cut the bone "wall" off, and then tie it all back together, that way when you are done, you can remove the bone, but still get the flavor.  It is just another way, and may or may not work for you.  It depends on what you want your presentation to look like.  Definitely cook low and slow.

    "You are who you are when nobody is looking"

  • lousubcaplousubcap Posts: 16,532
    thanks for all the info, will make sure have plenty of pics when our heat wave breaks and can git eggin

    Don't let the heat ruin a good BGE experience-that's one of the big plusses of the thing-once you dial it in you can monitor it from afar or let it run "unsupervised" and get yourself outta the heat while it does its thing.  Besides with the outside temps in the 100's you will use less lump...
    :)
    Louisville;  L & S BGEs, PBC, Lang 36; Burnin' wood in the neighbourhood. # 38 for the win.  Life is too short for light/lite beer.  
Sign In or Register to comment.
Click here for Forum Use Guidelines.