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Feet on an XL?

BoombottyBoombotty Posts: 39
edited 8:41AM in EggHead Forum
Hi all,
Anyone ever use a few feet on an XL? I like using them on my Lg, it makes it easier to clean out ash with the space between egg and block. I was wondering if you could use 4-6 feet under it.
Thanks,
Scott

Comments

  • RipnemRipnem Posts: 5,511
    Scott,

    BGE corp. states that the XL is not to be on the green feet. A large paver is what is recommended.
  • BGE doesn't recommend it and the "LGF" don't come with and XL.

    I suspect the concern is unsupported length under high temps.

    I used three under my XL for a couple years without any issues but don't do it any more.
  • thechief96thechief96 Posts: 1,908
    I have my XL in a table on a 2x2 paver on the three feet. I needed the extra height that the feet give me.
    Dave San Jose, CA The Duke of Loney
  • BGE advises NOT to use feet with the XL, and does not supply them.

    not an issue of the feet carrying the weight, but the unsupported bottom, whose span in an XL is a good bit greater than the large.

    i,m not trying to start a debate as to what specific issue is the one BGE is hanging their hat on, but i'm pretty sure their offical position is 'no'.

    there are BGE folks monitoring the forum. hopefully they will chime in.
  • thechief96thechief96 Posts: 1,908
    Perhaps a support in the center of the base? :huh:
    Dave San Jose, CA The Duke of Loney
  • fishlessmanfishlessman Posts: 19,937
    it will still only be sitting on three, its not perfectly flat
  • Photo EggPhoto Egg Posts: 5,436
    Yea, like one big paver stone for the whole Egg. :huh:
    Thank you,
    Darian

    Galveston Texas
  • After a couple years of the three green feet on a paver (with no issues BTW) I went to four large landscape style bricks/pavers. The way my table was setup I needed the feet for the extra 1/2" of height. Overall I'm happier with the stability on the "big rocks"

    IMG_1891800x600.jpg

    The small is set up similarly with the addition of a couple fire bricks (just because I had them) for height reasons.
  • beerguybeerguy Posts: 106
    First I've heard of that. My XL BGE came with the standard 3 feet and that is what it it sitting on.
  • beerguybeerguy Posts: 106
    This was news to me and my dealer gave me the feet with my XL so I fired off an email to BGE. They responded quickly and told me not to use the feet and instead to use a paver stone. They were surprised my dealer gave me the feet with the XL. I can't wait to lift the XL out of the steel cart it is in. :S
  • Yes, the load would need to be uniformly distributed.

    In order to use MORE than three legs, you'd have to have something compressive to fill the space so all legs make, more or less, "even contact", and have even distribution of the load to all feet.

    How about some of that felt gasket material on the top of the feet? That might work.
  • Why not just set it on paver stone(s) as reccomended by BGE & set it forward 1/2" at the lower vent which should give plenty of room to help with ash removal?
  • not sure bgeHQ wants the bottom to span that distance. it's not a matter of the feet not being able to carry the load, or of the bottom crushing at the feet.

    the ceramic can certainly handle the compression.

    BGEHQ never came out and said why, but the only reason i can see for them not wanting to use feet is fear of cracking when the bottom is under high heat (and loses what little tensile strength it has)
  • fishlessmanfishlessman Posts: 19,937
    i think thats the best solution
  • RRPRRP Posts: 19,512
    lifting is easy if you have sufficient room to use a shovel as a lever and most anything as the fulcrum. It doesn't take much effort. My little wife can easily lift our large that way so I can do whatever maintenance needed.
    L, M, S, Mini
    Ron
    Dunlap, IL
  • Photo EggPhoto Egg Posts: 5,436
    Show me a wife that is good with a shovel and I will show you an honest man. LOL
    Darian
    Thank you,
    Darian

    Galveston Texas
  • RRPRRP Posts: 19,512
    LOL - come to think of it I had to show her which end was the handle and ask her nicely to not let go of it while I had my fingers under there!
    L, M, S, Mini
    Ron
    Dunlap, IL
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