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A more tender Brisket

Nature BoyNature Boy Posts: 8,523
edited 6:56AM in EggHead Forum
Hi NB....[p]I have been reading your E-mails and I just have say thank your for sharing...your information has been real helpful for us "new-bees".[p]Have a question about making a brisket. I have made three briskets to date. They have been very moist and tasty. What I am trying to achieve is additional tenderness in the meat. The meat seems a bit firm....not tough but borderline. Marinated overnight with a rub from a BBQ place in Texas...great taste. Used some Pecan and Hickory for taste. Cooked at 240 degrees on a V-rack for 6 hours...the poulter read 175 degrees. Didn't wrap it in foil or anything like that....just naked on the V-rack. Any suggestions for getting it reeeeaaally tender?[p]Thanks....Captain BBQ
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Comments

  • Char-WoodyChar-Woody Posts: 2,642
    Hi Captain BBQ..[p]I will try and give ya a answer and NB can fill in his version also.[p]First..when you post fill in your name instead of the person your directing it too. Then your name appears in the from portion of the message. The reply is automatic when answering a post. Enter your name and your e.mail if you like.[p]We do the briskets low and slow 220 degrees but you can do them at your higher temperature also. Your looking for around 190 to 200 degrees internal in the thickest portion of the meat. When you reach 190 degrees, you can wrap in foil, and place in cooler wrapped with additional terry cloth towels to help insulate. The meat will continue to cook and retains more moisture. slice the meat cross grain for the most tender cuts. It should be fork twist tender when you remove it from the foil.
    I may have overlooked some details..Been a busy night..
    Cheers..C~W[p]

  • Nature BoyNature Boy Posts: 8,523
    Morning Cap'n,
    C~W filled you in purty good there. The key for tenderness is to get the brisket up in the 200 range, or at least until it passes the fork test. Sometimes it is earlier, but, like C~W said, 190 is a good time to try your fork twist. Also, like seedub mentiioned, when you pull it off, wrap it in foil and retire to a warm cooler with towels. It should rest for at least 30 minutes before slicing, but will keep hot for at least 2 hours in the cooler.[p]I prefer not to wrap on foil during any part of the cook. [p]Also, make sure the brisket has a fat cap, as it helps baste the meat and keep it moist. Try a whole brisket sometimes, and compare the results. The point end is my favorite part.[p]Good luck...you will have a moist, and very tender brisket on your next try.. .keep at it!![p]NB

    DizzyPigBBQ.com
    Twitter: @dizzypigbbq
    Facebook: Dizzy Pig Seasonings
    Instagram: @DizzyPigBBQ
  • Char-Woody,[p]Thanks for the help. Looks like I am pulling it off too early (175). When cooking at 220 do you have to kick up the heat to get it to the 190?...or, do you wait until it eventually gets there..[p]Again, Thanks. Because of "you guys" it just keeps getting better and better![p]Cap'n BBQ

  • MartyMarty Posts: 16
    Captain BBQ,
    My best and tenderest briskets have been cooked at 220 degrees or lower over indirect heat. I actually try to start them off at about 185 and let the heat slowly build up to around 200. I cook mine about 10 to 12 hours. Cut across the grain as stated and they will be fork tender. Make sure and leave about 1/4 inch of fat on the meat. If you trim it all off the outside of the meat will char too much. Good eatin!

  • sprintersprinter Posts: 1,188
    Captain BBQ,[p]Slow and steady wins the race. Keep it at a constant temp till you get the desired temp of about 190. It will reach a plateau at about 160-170 and hold for a LONG time, this is where the callogens in the meat break down, It will get there, plan on about 2.5 hours per pound at 200 for a brisket, you wont be sorry.[p]Troy
  • Char-WoodyChar-Woody Posts: 2,642
    sprinter, good post. Yep..he will hit that plateau and it will sit for a few hours then rise to the occassion. Patience is a good virtue. You can raise the temp the last hour to hasten it a bit if you feel you have too. Some have even finished em in a stove. I like the long route.
    Don't overdue the foil wrap as it will make the meat too tender for slicing.
    Cheers..C~W[p]

  • sprintersprinter Posts: 1,188
    Char-Woody,[p]"Yep..he will hit that plateau and it will sit for a few hours then rise to the occassion. Patience is a good virtue."[p]Boy See Dubya, good thing nobody took that last post of yours out of context huh?[p]Troy
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