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Bread

CRCR Posts: 175
edited 4:28PM in EggHead Forum
Did a couple of loaves of bread on my LBGE. Thay come out perfect but I really don't see any benefit by doing bread in the Egg.[p]It was fun to see if I could do it but in reality a waste of time; comes out the same in the oven. [p]Am I missing something about Egged bread???

Comments

  • Cr,
    I do prefer bread on the egg. I have dough rising as we speak. It is easier in a bread maker, but not as much fun. For an authentic bread crust, form the dough on a seasoned, floured & cornmealed, pizza peel. THen cook on plate setter inverted with a pizza stone. I brush my bread with Orville Redenbackers Butter Popcorn Oil and rake a sharp (very sharp) knive blade lengthwise after the bread has risen the final time on the peel.[p]Is it more work? Yes. It's all about you and what you want. Mine is a relaxing time and my daughter and I can do it together.

  • BordelloBordello Posts: 5,926
    Banker John,
    There are lots of things that I have not tried, baking is one of them. (Soon I hope) You hit the nail on the head big time, cooking with the egg is just fun. That is why I sometimes just fire it up and let it smoke, maybe throw an onion in to add aroma to the air. It's hard to not want to cook in the egg.
    New Bob

  • BlueSmokeBlueSmoke Posts: 1,678
    New Bob,
    Funny this thread should come along just now: I've got two round loaves about 15 mins. from perfection. I really like the crust I get on my sourdough. Today I'm experimenting: got a pan holding a gallon of water on the inverted plate setter, on the legs my "second grill" supporting 4 firebrick and finally the baking stone. First problem I see is temp: with that mass of water, and reusing charcoal, I can't get above 350º. Just have to wait a few minutes longer is all.
    Ken

  • BordelloBordello Posts: 5,926
    BlueSmoke,
    Please keep us informed on the outcome. I'm starting to get those empty feeling in my stomach and want to learn.
    New Bob

  • djm5x9djm5x9 Posts: 1,342
    BlueSmoke:[p]If the purpose of the gallon of water is to provide a bit of steam in the cooking chamber, use a small can strategically placed/suspended with enough water to do the job. French bread benefits from a misting in a traditional oven should work the same in a ceramic cooker.
  • BlueSmokeBlueSmoke Posts: 1,678
    djm5x9,
    You hit it on the head - now I know "how much is too much." Next time out I'll reduce the quantity of water by at least half; that ought to provide the steam while allowing higher temps. I've usually tried to mist my French breads in the conventional oven: this was far easier and produced a better result.
    Ken

  • BlueSmokeBlueSmoke Posts: 1,678
    New Bob,
    As I told djm5x9, a gallon is too much water. Next weekend's experiment will work with half a gallon, if that, in a smaller pan. There's a nice crunchy crisp crust. Color is a light golden. I'll attach my sourdough recipe if you're interested. (and by all means feel free to write)
    Ken[p]The Night Before
    combine the following, stirring until smooth
    2 cups flour
    2 packages yeast
    2 cups water
    1 Tablespoon sugar
    Cover loosely and let work overnight[p]The Following Morning
    stir the starter down and add
    3 to 4 cups flour
    1 Tablespoon salt
    1/4 cup oil[p]Knead until smooth, glossy and elastic (about 10 minutes in a Kitchen Aid with dough hook). Form into a ball, cover and let rise in a warm place until doubled in volume (1 to 1.5 hours).[p]Divide into 2 pieces, knead briefly and form into loaves. Cover and let rise until doubled (1 to 1.5 hours). I form mine into balls, and put them in 8" round biscuit pans for baking.[p]Preheat Egg to 400º. Bake on plate setter with baking stone 40 to 45 mins.[p]Notes: I usually add 2 Tablespoons wheat germ and 2 Tablespoons wheat bran, "the following morning". A Tablespoon of rubbed sage is an excellent addition too. Putting a pan of water under the baking stone aids the development of a crispy crust.

  • New Bob,
    Not really related to the topic ... but I walked into the BBQ Galore in Duluth a couple of weeks ago and the gently smoking BGE outside smelled absolutely wonderful. I asked the guy inside what was cooking. He said, "just wood". Yup, I'll probably do the same thing next spring or summer whilst relaxing after work on the patio. Maybe it will keep the flying, blood and flesh craving insects away.

  • djm5x9djm5x9 Posts: 1,342
    BlueSmoke:[p]In the oven I place a glass pan on the bottom rack close to the element with enough water to provide the steam. On your cooker, keep in mind that moisture is a byproduct of a fresh load of burning charcoal, thus your added water is just a supplement. A preheated can will do the trick. It is sometimes a pain to cook bread on a ceramic cooker, but exposed bread on a stone benefits from this method. If I was cooking loafs of bread in a pan I would just stick to the oven.
  • djm5x9djm5x9 Posts: 1,342
    Dave's Not Here:[p]Add an onion and some garlic to the fire with some Jack Daniel's chips . . . You will be rolling around like a cat in catnip!
    [/b]
  • PujPuj Posts: 615
    Cr,[p]I'll agree with you, many breads do not benefit by being Egged over the conventional oven. However, try creating the same environment of a brick oven which is ... with your ceramics (at least an inch of thickness) in the Egg, take the dome temp to about 700°F. Shut the lower vent completely and put the rain cap on. When the dome temp drops to about 550°F, put a small can of hot water in the Egg. Use a can that can fit under a plate setter, or something similar. 4 oz. of hot water is plenty. Bread and its crust like steam during the first part of a bake to assist in creating "oven spring".[p]Put a large sourdough boule in at this time. No fire should be visible at this juncture. Bake anywhere from 40 to 60 minutes. Bread is typically done at 200°F to 205°F internal. Of course a good knuckle knock on the bottom of the loaf that sounds hollow is good enough.[p]Give it a try, then decide whether its worth the effort to bake bread in the Egg.[p]Puj
  • BlueSmoke,
    FOr the water can, I use a tuna fish can (wash it first - duh!). It holds just about the right amount for a good 35 minute bake at 350.[p]My bread today was a new recipe (what I had in the cabinet) Had friends over for dinner and they wanted the leftovers. I'm glad I wrote down the recipe.

  • Puj,
    Oh yeah! This may be a Saturday bake!

  • PujPuj Posts: 615
    Banker John,[p]Just be cognizant of how hot the ceramic surface is at the time you put the boule on. One way to test for the temp of the baking stone is to sprinkle some flour on the surface. If the flour starts to turn brown in about 15 seconds, the stone is at a good temp. If it turns brown sooner, mop the surface with a wet (but well rung) rag to cool the stone. Then place the loaf on and have some fun.[p]Managing the temp of the bake and the ceramic surface are the challenges. Good luck,[p]Puj
  • BlueSmokeBlueSmoke Posts: 1,678
    Puj,
    Have you ever done baguettes this way?

  • PujPuj Posts: 615
    BlueSmoke,[p]Yes, but of course it's a shorter baguette - 15" in length max. In my oven in the house I can get away with 3 - 19"/20" baguettes since I have a 21" x 15" stone. The baguettes usually bake in 28 to 32 minutes regardless of the oven/Egg.[p]Puj

  • BlueSmokeBlueSmoke Posts: 1,678
    Puj,
    Thanks.
    Ken

  • PujPuj Posts: 615
    BlueSmoke,[p]Anytime.[p]Puj
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