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What is "Hot Tubbing"?

KyleKyle Posts: 156
edited 7:14PM in EggHead Forum
AZRP posted a note on "Hot Tubbing".
His steaks looked great.
What is the process of Hot Tubbing.[p]Thanks for educating me.[p]Kyle

Comments

  • AZRPAZRP Posts: 10,116
    Kyle,
    Cooks Illustrated did an article on cooking London broil with this method. What you do is put the steak in a ziplock bag, squeeze out as much air as possible, then soak it in 100 degree water for an hour. This brings the internal temp of the meat to 100 degrees and at that point all you need to do is a good sear and rest. -RP

  • Hoss's BBQHoss's BBQ Posts: 435
    Kyle,
    I think tht cooks Illustrated is making a technique called Sous Vide more accesible to the public. We use this technique in restaurants to cook proteins to an internal temp then we shock in ice water. It allows for a fast pick up time during service. There are water baths that have heating elements and circulaters in the water. We cryovac the food generally with flavoring agents and can cook at low temps. I know one chef who braise beef short ribs for 48 hours doing this. when you cut into the short rib it is spoon tender and still medium rare in color. I lot more chef are using this techniques in the food world also because it cuts out waste. Hoss

  • UnConundrumUnConundrum Posts: 536
    Hoss's BBQ,[p]Been there..... Sous Vide meets the BGE:[p]http://www.recipesonrails.com/recipes/show/513-sous-vide-bottom-round-roast
  • AZRPAZRP Posts: 10,116
    UnConundrum,
    Wouldn't ten hours at 128 be in the danger zone? -RP

  • MemphisMemphis Posts: 144
    AZRP, Do you heat the water to 100 deg then put the steak in and let the water cool ?? OR do yoiu maintain a 100 deg water temp for 1 hour ????

  • Hoss's BBQHoss's BBQ Posts: 435
    AZRP,
    Since the cryovaced product does not come in contact with oxyegen this is considered safe. Now this can become debateable for sure. I know some board of health depts. have raised questions and according to an article in the New york times last year these questions were raised out of a lack of understanding the process according to one official. I feel the process is good when monitered the correct way. I would never try the 48 hour braised short ribs with out the circulator and baths we have at the hotel. The shocking of proudct is also key to the process comericaially. The retherm of cold sousvide product is done at high heat temps during service. We can also discuss this some mor ein waldorf RP. Hoss

  • stikestike Posts: 15,597
    mEMPHIS,
    i use the hottest tap water i can muster, about 130. i might change it once after maybe 15 minutes or so.[p]what it does for steaks, that i've noticed, is essentially super-room-temps them. "room temp" is a misnomer and inefficient, IMHO. leave a steak out for an hour straight from the fridge and it'll be maybe 45 50 in an hour, internally.[p]hotubbing get me within 35 degrees of 'done'. Usually the steak is 100 degrees when it goes on the grill. That gives me just the sear portion of the cook, and when i cut the steak, it is damn near medium rare all the way across, rather than gray at the edges, and just med/rare in the middle.[p]it's not really even remotely sous vide, which can essentially entirely cook the meat, and which is much more controlled, done under vacuum, etc.[p]hot tubbing is essentially super-room-temp, and done (in my house, anyway) to maximize the cross section of the finished meat.[p]the cook's illustrated method was for bigger/cheaper cuts, and done with an eye to accelerating enzyme action, which can change (for the better) the meat flavor itself.

    ed egli avea del cul fatto trombetta -Dante
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