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I would like to hear from users who have roasted a turkey on the egg...especially size limitations,

What is the maximum size turkey for roasting on a large egg? How long per lb??

Comments

  • bdavidsonbdavidson Posts: 411
    marueen walsh,
    For Thanksgiving last year, I roasted a 30.5 lb turkey. It just fit in the large egg. I didn't use stuffing, but I used applied a rub inside the cavity and under the skin, then brushed some olive oil onto the skin to enhance browning. It was wonderful! I don't know if I'll do another turkey of that size this year...leftovers lasted forever!
    Plan on cooking it for 15-20 minutes per pound at 300 degrees. Use a polder-type thermometer to be sure it's done.

  • marueen walsh,[p] I did about a 25 pounder last year. Fit pretty well but plan on removing or backing out the dome temp thermometer so it doesn't impale the turkey. No stuffing, but I did put some sliced apples and oranges in the cavity. Brined it for 24 hours (including the now infamous "Incredible Exploding Turkey Water Balloon Incident"), applied a rub to the inside and under the skin. Started it at about 225 with pecan chips, then raised the heat to 325 after about 15-20 minutes of heavyish smoke. Cooked it over a drip pan full of beer (set on a pizza stone)at about 325 until the thigh was 180F. This ended up being a bit too long, and now -- after reading more info on the forum -- I'll go until the temp in the center of the breast gets to about 160F-165. Sprayed peanut oil onto the skin and it turned pretty darn dark brown. Will probably wait until later in the cook this time to put the oil or butter on. I'm also gonna let the bird dry overnight in the fridge after brining this time to get crispier skin. Can't remember exactly, but the 15-20 minutes a pound number sounds about right to me, too.[p]MikeO
  • MikeO, I remember posting this same question before, but didn't get an answer so I'll try again...what kind of vessel did you use to brine a 25# turkey? You must have or have access to some institutional size pots as well as refrigator to put that pot in! Some of us poor mortals don't have those size toys so I'm wondering how the rest of us might approach the task of brining such a big bird. ^oo^~

  • one feral kat,[p] I did answer this question a few weeks back. I think RRP asked me. See:[p]Water Balloon[p]MikeO
  • GretlGretl Posts: 670
    marueen walsh,
    I roasted a 25-pounder last Christmas. As MikeO said, if you oil it too early it really browns. Like, forest fire victim. But miraculously, the meat was juicy and succulent. My biggest challenge was keeping the guests from seeing Charro's skin! I did not put the pan on firebricks and that was a mistake. Since then, I've been doing slightly smaller birds. I use a rack on a drip pan set on firebricks, because the juice is excellent for making gravy, and the drippings burn if you don't use a couple of bricks. Brine for 24 hours, rinse well, and rub under the skin with garlic, sage, pepper, etc. The suggestion to leave the naked bird in the fridge uncovered for a day after brining is something I read just this morning in the new Cook's Illustrated magazine. I'll try that next time. I keep the temp around 350 and use a Polder-clone probe. I don't stuff the bird; I make conventional stuffing in a separate pan in the oven.[p]If you have a vertical poultry roaster, any of the beer-butt recipes are wonderful with turkey. Obviously, a huge turkey won't sit upright, so stay small with this method. Have fun![p]Cheers,
    Gretl

  • GretlGretl Posts: 670
    one feral kat,
    I have a big round metal mixing bowl that fits in the fridge and holds a large turkey, but not so it can be submerged. I put the turkey and the brine in a double layer of plastic bags and turn it VERY CAREFULLY in the bowl several times a day. If the weather's cold, I use a 5-gallon covered plastic bucket I bought for three bucks from a local dairy. I line the bucket with a double layer of plastic bag, then leave it covered on the back deck or in the porch, depending on how cold it is. I'm petitioning for another refrigerator for the basement. I just read MikeO's Turkey Water Balloon story and laughed out loud. God, what a mess!
    Cheers,
    Gretl

  • BDBD Posts: 87
    one feral kat,
    I've used tall kitchen garbage bags to contain the turkey and the brine and place the whole ensemble into the fridge.

  • Gretl,[p] Would it make you laugh harder if you knew my heater/AC vents are in the floor :-0? Almost makes the duct cleaning worth the money! Hardest part was moving the frig so I could get all the liquid out from under it. Turkey tasted great, though . . .[p]MikeO[p]
  • BDBD Posts: 87
    Gretl,
    That sounds good. I will try a beer butt turkey breast next time.

  • BDBD Posts: 87
    MikeO,
    What a nightmare!

  • RhumAndJerkRhumAndJerk Posts: 1,506
    Gretl,
    When the idea of Beer Butt chicken came out, people were talking about a contraption called Willie’s Chicken Sitter. I just did a quick search and here is what I found. [p]Does anyone out there use these?[p]RhumAndJerk[p]

    [ul][li]Willie’s Turkey Sitter[/ul]
  • davidmdavidm Posts: 64
    RhumAndJerk,[p]I use one, and it is splendid. I pour a half-can of beer and a couple of TBS of JJ's miraculous rub into the sitter, then jam the Guest of Honor onto his Ceramic Throne.[p]He doesn't tip, he doesn't wiggle. And cleanup is pretty easy, especially if you've oiled the business end.[p]Much more stable than a can.
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