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platesetter leg rotation... leg to the back? or to the front?

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this isn't a platesetter legs up or legs down question.

Instead, a question about where to position the legs rotationally.

I hadn't given this any thought until I read a comment from @stlcharcoal in this thread about having a platesetter leg under the thermometer. https://eggheadforum.com/discussion/1231639/out-of-control-temp

A few years ago I got a PSwoo, and it seemed more natural to have one leg in the back and two towards the front.

without the PSwoo, I remember putting two legs to the back and one towards  the front by the handle. It was just a natural way to hold the platesetter.

Does a leg in the front make a difference vs a leg in the back?

This is on a large, if that matters.

I can spin the PSwoo 180 degrees so it can go either way.
current: | Large BGE |  Genesis 1000 | Genesis E330 | 22 inch Kettle | Weber Summit Kamado
sold:| PitBoss pro 820  WSM 22 

Comments

  • lousubcap
    lousubcap Posts: 32,607
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    Short answer-Yes!
    For me the placement depends on what you want to achieve.  The leg to the back helps diffuse the  natural heat flow which heads to the back and up toward the exhaust.  Leg to the front shields the dome thermo from any direct heat variations you can get with the location of the fire.
    You can actually neutralize the impact either way by placing a piece of foil over the open end that is anchored by the grid. 
    Louisville; Rolling smoke in the neighbourhood. # 38 for the win.  Life is too short for light/lite beer!  Seems I'm livin in a transitional period.
  • stlcharcoal
    stlcharcoal Posts: 4,688
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    Yes, the legs at 10, 2, so mostly importantly the last is at 6.....protects the dome thermometer probe.
  • Canugghead
    Canugghead Posts: 11,635
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    Learned something new, thanks.
    Next question: PS in or out of the fire ring notches?
    canuckland
  • stlcharcoal
    stlcharcoal Posts: 4,688
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    It's designed to be in the notches so that the grid is at the felt line giving you more room above to close the dome (and have a smaller gap gor the fire to come through.)  But for 15 yrs I eggd with one on a fire ring that didn't have notches.  It's up to you.
  • Canugghead
    Canugghead Posts: 11,635
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    I know btu is btu, but in my simplistic thinking I feel more air flow = more fuel efficient. More often than not I have the PS out of the notches. Headroom is usually not important to me since I seldom do multi level cook. When I do whole turkey I have the roast pan sitting on PS with spacers, sans grid.
    canuckland
  • Dyal_SC
    Dyal_SC Posts: 6,094
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    I can’t even remember the last time I truly relied on the dome thermometer for anything.  Once you’ve used your egg enough, you sorta just know where to adjust your damper and wheel.  I think mine is off by at least 25-50 degrees, but it’s been years since I’ve checked it. 
  • stlcharcoal
    stlcharcoal Posts: 4,688
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    I know btu is btu, but in my simplistic thinking I feel more air flow = more fuel efficient. More often than not I have the PS out of the notches. Headroom is usually not important to me since I seldom do multi level cook. When I do whole turkey I have the roast pan sitting on PS with spacers, sans grid.
    Unless you're running 350F+, that difference in space means nothing.  Look at how much the damper and lower vents are open, then compare it to the amount of open space around that plate setter......the space around the PS is 20x.  Once you start getting up to higher temps, then that flue action does make a difference.
  • The_Buffalo
    The_Buffalo Posts: 459
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    Legs up in the 10,2 and 6 positions, this is the BGE recommended way. 
    Coming to you from the Mothership!
  • danhoo
    danhoo Posts: 690
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    Langner91 said:
    Legs up in the 10,2 and 6 positions, this is the BGE recommended way. 

    That's my girlfriend's recommended way 
    Your girlfriend has three legs?

    Who's gonna tell him?
    Maybe she's at 10 and 2, and he's got her 6.


    current: | Large BGE |  Genesis 1000 | Genesis E330 | 22 inch Kettle | Weber Summit Kamado
    sold:| PitBoss pro 820  WSM 22 
  • Canugghead
    Canugghead Posts: 11,635
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    This used to be a much more 👨‍👩‍👧‍👦 friendlier place.
    canuckland
  • CGS
    CGS Posts: 71
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    I know btu is btu, but in my simplistic thinking I feel more air flow = more fuel efficient. More often than not I have the PS out of the notches. Headroom is usually not important to me since I seldom do multi level cook. When I do whole turkey I have the roast pan sitting on PS with spacers, sans grid.
    Unless you're running 350F+, that difference in space means nothing.  Look at how much the damper and lower vents are open, then compare it to the amount of open space around that plate setter......the space around the PS is 20x.  Once you start getting up to higher temps, then that flue action does make a difference.
    space around the indirect piece does matter, it's the difference between drawing/rolling heat around a deflector vs. radiating through a deflector. How hard do you think a fire would have to work to push heat through a 1/4" x 3" gap between the indirect piece and fire ring to get the grill stabilized with the dome thermometer at 250°F.

    The energy consumption under the indirect piece is one of the reasons why we measure temperature above the heat deflector. 

    Similar to why a closed off room in the dead of winter is colder than the rest of the open house.

    t   
  • CGS
    CGS Posts: 71
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    Personally, I don't think it matters where you put the conveggtor/platesetter legs, because on the majority of indirect cooks folks do, some part of the cook is sitting outside the platesetter/conveggtor's protection and over the three open air channels.

    t
  • stlcharcoal
    stlcharcoal Posts: 4,688
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    CGS said:

    space around the indirect piece does matter, it's the difference between drawing/rolling heat around a deflector vs. radiating through a deflector. How hard do you think a fire would have to work to push heat through a 1/4" x 3" gap between the indirect piece and fire ring to get the grill stabilized with the dome thermometer at 250°F.

    The energy consumption under the indirect piece is one of the reasons why we measure temperature above the heat deflector. 

    Similar to why a closed off room in the dead of winter is colder than the rest of the open house.

    t   
    The fire is not trying to push the heat though......it's getting pulled through via the flue action and heat rising.

    To your analogy on the house, the room isn't closed off though, there is an opening and the only cold air return is in that room (i.e. chimney cap.)  The air flow will transfer the heat in this case, not just by radiating heat through the wall.  Yes the smaller the gap, the longer it takes, but the temp difference is very small in this case.

    I know that BGE has made that gap smaller over the years, but on a low and slow, as long as it's larger than the air in or exhaust out, it really shouldn't be hampering anything.  Now once you pass a certain temp [and depending on what version of PS or stone you have] you might have to take it out of the notches, or go legs down.  I have one of the older ones where there's at least a 3/4" gap.....I can easily get 350F+ with it still in the notches.  If I want to do a spatchcocked chicken, pizza, or something indirect at 400+, I can get to higher, temps and faster, going legs down since the PS isn't acting as a restrictor plate.  

    If it is in fact only a 1/4" gap, that max temp number is going to be lower, but if you have that 1/4", 360 degrees a 16" stone, I imagine you can still go to at least 300F, right?

    In the end, it's going to make a difference what everyone's particular set up is, the outside air temp, and how big the piece of meat is because of the evaporation.  All I'm saying is that at on a low and slow (sub-250F), it really doesn't matter if you're in the notches or not because there is barely any airflow going into the firebox to begin with.
  • Canugghead
    Canugghead Posts: 11,635
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    Case for 12,4,8:

    Since it's recommended that, after inserting your probe, to minimise direct heat damage, you want to make sure the wire runs over a leg, not between legs. IMO it's more logical to use the leg at 4 or 8 for wire protection.

    Leg at 12 also helps to impede air flow at the back where it tends to get hotter?
    canuckland
  • stlcharcoal
    stlcharcoal Posts: 4,688
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    You can still have a flame come up the front if that's where the fire wants to go.  It's not going to happen on a low and slow thought.  It's just good practice to protect the dome temp probe.  I've also had times where I've had something sitting too high, and it's poked into the meat when closing dome.  That will screw up the reading too.

    I always bring the FlameBoss or Thermoworks wires in over a PS leg.  The orientation doesn't matter for that.  I've also ran them through the daisy wheel or smokeware cap in the case of a worn out gasket.

    I only have had that issue with being hotter in the back with my XL.  Not so much of an issue with the M and L, because the firebox is so much taller.  Again, I notice it more at higher temps when grilling--not so much if I have the PS installed.
  • Canugghead
    Canugghead Posts: 11,635
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    ... Yes the smaller the gap, the longer it takes, but the temp difference is very small in this case...

    Temp is not the only factor at play, especially at 350+. Think of the kitchen box regular bake vs. convection bake.  Also think of defrosting in cold water with Anova vs. without. 
    canuckland
  • stlcharcoal
    stlcharcoal Posts: 4,688
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    ... Yes the smaller the gap, the longer it takes, but the temp difference is very small in this case...

    Temp is not the only factor at play, especially at 350+. Think of the kitchen box regular bake vs. convection bake.  Also think of defrosting in cold water with Anova vs. without. 
    That was in reference to Tom's house analogy, but you're absolutely correct. 
  • Canugghead
    Canugghead Posts: 11,635
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    @stlcharcoal ooops, my bad for taking that out of context  :)
    canuckland
  • MaskedMarvel
    MaskedMarvel Posts: 3,156
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    This conversation vaguely reminds me of an ancient Straight Dope where the impact of evaporation on lowering temperature was compared by measuring a hot cup of coffee in a freezer versus a cup being hit on the surface by a hot hair dryer. 

    Hair dryer wins. 

    … Now, to check the orientation of my fire ring….
    Large BGE and Medium BGE
    36" Blackstone - Greensboro!