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Building a kitchen

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We recently tore out our deck and replaced it with a patio.  I plan to build an outdoor kitchen to hold, among other things, my egg.  I've seen two methods that look appealing, and I was curious the costs and benefits of each.  The first method was to build the kitchen out of paver stones.  The second was to build a wood frame and put a stone facade around it.  Thanks in advance.

Comments

  • Canugghead
    Canugghead Posts: 11,524
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    I would have picked Dislikowart2022
    canuckland
  • anoncoward2022
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    @Tspud1 that looks amazing.  What made you decide to go in that direction?
  • TheBreeze
    TheBreeze Posts: 18
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    One thing you may want to take into account is weight, and whether or not that matters in the area you are building it in.  If you build it out of just stacked pavers, it is going to weigh a lot.  

    Here is my little table that I built in the fall using just stacked pavers.  Even though the center is hollow for storage and there is a bit of hollow space under each egg, it still used 150 pavers and weighs 3500 pounds with the eggs. 

     


  • Ozzie_Isaac
    Ozzie_Isaac Posts: 19,070
    edited April 2022
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    Wood frame with stone veneer is awesome from the flexibility standpoint. The wood is much easier to build the frame, more flexibility to place components, less wasted space than paver or cement block.

    Pavers or cement block is good from durability, heat resistance, sturdiness, etc.  It is harder for sizing/spacing and I suspect a good bit more expensive. As @TheBreeze said ground prep may be a consideration too.  My kitchen has pretty decent footers required for the cement block.

     If possible I would recommend a metal frame with cement board.  You get flexibility and space efficiency of wood frame, but heat resistance of cement block or pavers.  If I had to do it again, this is the route I would go.
    A bison’s level of aggressiveness, both physical and passive, is legendary. - NPS
  • anoncoward2022
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    @Ozzie_Isaac How do you go about building the metal frame?  Is it something you can source all from Home Depot, or do you need to be able to weld?
  • JohnfromKentucky
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    Tspud1 said:
    @Tspud1 that looks amazing.  What made you decide to go in that direction?
    easier to make the openings for the stainless components. Most of those are standard parts from the egg tables we do. Counter top is stained concrete with one of our commercial broiler griddle added along with 2 burner hot plate
    THat looks awesome! Do you have the plans for this to share? was it all 2x4?
  • JohnfromKentucky
    JohnfromKentucky Posts: 432
    edited April 2022
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    @jdMyers
    "Pavers are extremely heavy.   If you didn't prepare cement for this type of weight then ON the patio will be a potential problem to consider breaking cement or cracking."

    How could I tell if my pad is thick/strong enough for this? I bought my house from someone so I don't know if it is or not.
  • Ozzie_Isaac
    Ozzie_Isaac Posts: 19,070
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    @jdMyers kitchen is absolutely gorgeous, all of his questions he poses are ones to take serious.  Layout and access is key to getting the most out of your kitchen.  Landing space for food and utensils is very important.

    Put in as much storage as you possibly can, and as much counter space as feasible.

    On the question of the metal framing, (metal studs) I have a local BBQ store that you can buy it at.  I assume it is available from a building supply store or online.  Not as readily available as wood, but still carried.

    https://www.lowes.com/pl/Metal-studs-Drywall-framing-Drywall-Building-supplies/4294715714?cm_mmc=src-_-c-_-prd-_-bdm-_-ggl-_-DSA_BDM_248_Drywall-and-Ceiling-_--_-0-_-0-_-0&gclsrc=aw.ds&gclid=CjwKCAjwjZmTBhB4EiwAynRmD0n3Pno7e3CX0BibW203AqtHEFElvV2i_E1xJLzndgCkaKsTMs99iBoCr5EQAvD_BwE

    A bison’s level of aggressiveness, both physical and passive, is legendary. - NPS
  • jdMyers
    jdMyers Posts: 1,336
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    Thank you for the kind words. Took 3 years in stages.

    You bring up a great point.  Metal studs are cheaper and easier to fit than wood.  Ref cement.  I would call a local cement patio company.  Not a diy weekend warrior.  Have then come out for an estimate to extend your patio.  i KNOW ITS A LIE, but while there there they can guide you on what you have vs what weight it will hold.  Is. 4 inch thick on a gravel bed on dirt vs 8 inch on gravel etc.  If it's not there.  What space do you have to off set the kitchen off to the edge and build it in the ground over lapping the cement.  Less weight.  More access under ground for stuff.  I purposely made mine wider than the house.  So flames smoke etc are outside the house edge.  Left more patio.

    I also failed in that everything I learned or added required me to dig up the trench 3 times, arrrgg.  So if your running gas lines propane, electric, water etc.  Also water lines make sure you have access to cleanout, shut off, and winterize.

    Jd
    Columbus, Ohio
  • jdMyers
    jdMyers Posts: 1,336
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    Post photos of your space.  We all can help you struggle with oooh I need that too ideas
    Columbus, Ohio
  • Tspud1
    Tspud1 Posts: 1,486
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    Tspud1 said:
    @Tspud1 that looks amazing.  What made you decide to go in that direction?
    easier to make the openings for the stainless components. Most of those are standard parts from the egg tables we do. Counter top is stained concrete with one of our commercial broiler griddle added along with 2 burner hot plate
    THat looks awesome! Do you have the plans for this to share? was it all 2x4?
    No plans, spot built to patio size. Framed up then Hardyboard put on for the rock veneer to be applied. I gave them dimensions of the stainless pieces so the openings
    would match.
  • anoncoward2022
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    Based on the above, I'm going to make an L-shape kitchen with metal studs.  I'll put the egg in the back corner at a lower level than the counters.

    I plan on making one leg 100x30 inches while the other is 120x30, with 30 inches of both the overlap where the egg will sit. 

    From what I've seen online, I'll use 20 gauge track connected by 20 gauge studs.  On the 100 inch leg, I might do a bar off the back side.

  • Mr_D
    Mr_D Posts: 18
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    I have been doing a lot of research on outdoor kitchens and came across this business. Not sure of cost but the simplicity for a DIY'er seems good.

    https://grillnetics.com/