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Smoking a packer prime brisket help

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So this is my first time doing a few things. Gonna be smoking a whole prime brisket which I’ve never done. Have done a choice before but this is more pressure lol. I’m also wet aging it for around 40 days from pack date. Any tips on trimming fat off. Separate point and flat before or after smoking? Any tips on wet aging prep  washing off any smell expected? Thank you guys

Comments

  • Mark_B_Good
    Mark_B_Good Posts: 1,518
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    Hmmm ... you're wet aging it for 40 days?  Why?

    So, there's the turbo method (higher cook temp, you can start at a decent time in the morning, and it'll be ready for dinner), or the traditional method (lower cook temp, normally means starting the night before ... and getting very little sleep).

    I've now moved to the turbo method ... here is the recipe ... Turbo Brisket — Big Green Egg - EGGhead Forum - The Ultimate Cooking Experience...

    A few tips ... keep most of the fat on the flat (thinner) part, to prevent it from drying out, and cook fat down.  On other hand, trim fat off point ... it's thicker and that's basically what you're cooking.  Inject with beef broth, pat dry, apply binding agent (I like to use mayo for brisket) and liberally apply seasoning to all sides ... let rest for at least 24h before cooking.

    When you cook (indirect), temperature control is important, so make sure you have your fire stable before you put in the brisket. I wrap in foil when I hit the stall (around 150F to 160F).  They I normally start checking it when it hits 195F to 200F ... poke with a toothpick, and if it slides in easily, like it's soft butter, time to take it off (normally happens at 203F to 205F).

    Keep in foil, towel wrap (thick towels) and put in cooler for at least 1h ... preferably 2h, before you serve.
    Napoleon Prestige Pro 665, XL BGE, Lots of time for BBQ!
  • Langner91
    Langner91 Posts: 2,120
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    I will say it will potentially cook faster than a choice, if you have experience with those.  

    I like to trim anything hard for fat, it just doesn't render.  There are good videos on trimming brisket on youtube.  I trim a lot.

    I do not separate before smoking.  I leave it whole.  Let it ride.  I like to wrap at 160°F.  But, that is my preference.  I hold (FTC) in a cooler for up to 6 hours. 

    The last prime packer I did got done very fast and I had to hold in the oven for a couple hours before FTC. It was still the best brisket I have ever had.

    Others here will have more information.
    Clinton, Iowa
  • lousubcap
    lousubcap Posts: 32,375
    edited February 2022
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    @WhoISpepesilvia - PM sent with a collection of brisket info I have assembled over the years.  Should answer most questions.  FWIW-
    Edit: The process is the same regardless of the pedigree of the cut.  So, you've got this.
    I generally wet age for around 4 weeks, always fat side up and with a slope toward the flat end of the packer.  There may be a slight smell  when you open it up but it quickly dissipates.    
    Louisville; Rolling smoke in the neighbourhood. # 38 for the win.  Life is too short for light/lite beer!  Seems I'm livin in a transitional period.
  • CTMike
    CTMike Posts: 3,247
    edited February 2022
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    . . . liberally apply seasoning to all sides ... let rest for at least 24h before cooking.
    Applying the rub and letting it rest for 24 hours will cause the salt in your rub to pull moisture out of the brisket. I assume you do this in a pan and have a lot of liquid in the bottom after the 24 hours? In my experience that can lead to a very dry flat - not so much the point because it is so fatty.

    YMMV.
    MMBGE / Large BGE / XL BGE (Craigslist Find) / SF30x80 cabinet trailer - "Ol' Mortimer" / Outdoor kitchen in progress.  

    RECOVERING BUBBLEHEAD
    Southeastern CT. 
  • Mark_B_Good
    Mark_B_Good Posts: 1,518
    edited February 2022
    Options
    CTMike said:

    . . . liberally apply seasoning to all sides ... let rest for at least 24h before cooking.
    Applying the rub and letting it rest for 24 hours will cause the salt in your rub to pull moisture out of the brisket. I assume you do this in a pan and have a lot of liquid in the bottom after the 24 hours? In my experience that can lead to a very dry flat - not so much the point because it is so fatty.

    YMMV.
    Hmm, never thought of that Mike ... that's my method, and the flat hasn't been that dry in my cooks.  One thing is, the quantity of salt in the seasoning ... I don't like my brisket over salty, so to start the seasoning is more other types of herbs and peppers.  But, good point ... and it does make sense ... maybe for the flat I'll season on the lighter side next time considering how thin that part is.

    Can anything be said about using a binder though? I find when I take the meat out of the fridge ... the seasoning is kind of crusty, and I find very little meat juices on the bottom of the pan. Also note, I ALWAYS put about 2 cups of beef broth into my brisket ... so I don't think with that method it leads to dryness. 
    Napoleon Prestige Pro 665, XL BGE, Lots of time for BBQ!
  • WhoISpepesilvia
    Options
    Hmmm ... you're wet aging it for 40 days?  Why?

    So, there's the turbo method (higher cook temp, you can start at a decent time in the morning, and it'll be ready for dinner), or the traditional method (lower cook temp, normally means starting the night before ... and getting very little sleep).

    I've now moved to the turbo method ... here is the recipe ... Turbo Brisket — Big Green Egg - EGGhead Forum - The Ultimate Cooking Experience...

    A few tips ... keep most of the fat on the flat (thinner) part, to prevent it from drying out, and cook fat down.  On other hand, trim fat off point ... it's thicker and that's basically what you're cooking.  Inject with beef broth, pat dry, apply binding agent (I like to use mayo for brisket) and liberally apply seasoning to all sides ... let rest for at least 24h before cooking.

    When you cook (indirect), temperature control is important, so make sure you have your fire stable before you put in the brisket. I wrap in foil when I hit the stall (around 150F to 160F).  They I normally start checking it when it hits 195F to 200F ... poke with a toothpick, and if it slides in easily, like it's soft butter, time to take it off (normally happens at 203F to 205F).

    Keep in foil, towel wrap (thick towels) and put in cooler for at least 1h ... preferably 2h, before you serve.
    https://howtobbqright.com/2013/08/08/how-to-wet-age-a-brisket/

    Following this. And many people i know talk about wet aging. I bought it on sale too and didn’t have time to make it right away. 
  • WhoISpepesilvia
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    I should definitely rinse it off after opening huh?
  • lousubcap
    lousubcap Posts: 32,375
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    I always rinse it off-had not seen that Malcom Reed video before.  Thanks for the link.  
    Louisville; Rolling smoke in the neighbourhood. # 38 for the win.  Life is too short for light/lite beer!  Seems I'm livin in a transitional period.
  • nolaegghead
    nolaegghead Posts: 42,102
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    Dryness:  I wouldn't sweat moisture loss in low and slow roasts like brisket and butt.  It is typical to lose 40-50% of the starting weight in moisture loss (look at average yields for serving).  

    The difference between a "dry" and good slice of BBQ brisket, or butt, is not the moisture content, but the tenderness and fat content.  Most of any moisture will be tied up in gelatin as the collagen breaks down.  External fat mixing in to a serving helps.  Cutting all the fat off a piece of meat means you are relying on intramuscular fat, of which is highly dependent on the quality of the meat.  Keeping fat on the meat releases fat into the serving.  Pulled pork is usually "moist" because butts are around 20% fat and it's all mixed together in a good ratio.
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