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New cooking pan set?

JNDATHPJNDATHP Posts: 451
edited November 22 in Off Topic
We don’t have a lot of money to spend on a new pan set but are wondering what would be a good replacement for our failing non-stick pans. 

We have stainless for our pots. And we do have a full set of old (from the 70’s) le Creuset. But for a quick omelet?
Michael
Large BGE
Reno, NV

Comments

  • RRPRRP Posts: 23,497
    you might get better help if you tell us:
    use only on your stove?
    gas or electric?
    approximate amount you want to spend?
    are you willing to go slow and buy quality pieces one at a time rather than spending a wad for pieces you may never even want or use?
    Re-gasketing America one yard at a time.
  • JNDATHPJNDATHP Posts: 451
    We have gas. Never want electric. 

    Absolutely willing to buy a piece at a time and can spend a few hundred dollars per pan. 

    Would like to be able to put them in the oven or on the egg. 
    Michael
    Large BGE
    Reno, NV
  • If you haven’t before considered them, do yourself a favour and buy a set of carbon steel. Season them every now and again. Great, great pans. Then spend the extra cash you would have otherwise spent on pricier pans to buy a nice Japanese chef’s knife and a butcher block. Win win. 
  • BattlebornBattleborn Posts: 1,861
    We bought the Kirkland brand set from Costco when we moved. I use the whole set, with the exception of the grill pan. Don’t use them on the Egg, but they have served us well. 
    Las Vegas, NV
    LG BGE, off-set smoker & various Weber's 
  • TEXASBGE2018TEXASBGE2018 Posts: 2,928
    Agree with @GrateEggspectations Lodge Carbon steel are affordable and I love mine.


    Rockwall, Tx    LBGE, Minimax, 22" Blackstone, Pizza Party Bollore. Cast Iron Hoarder.

  • I believe what you are looking for is All Clad.  
    Large BGE, Small BGE, Weber Summit NG                                                                                               
    Memphis  
  • ColtsFanColtsFan Posts: 4,766
    Check All Clad’s factory 2nd. Minor blemishes but totally functional 
    ~ John - https://www.instagram.com/hoosier_egger
    XL BGE, LG BGE, KJ Jr, Ardore Pizza Oven, King Disc 
    Bloomington, IN - Hoo Hoo Hoo Hoosiers!

  • paqmanpaqman Posts: 3,318
    For non-stick specifically, I am partial to the oxo pans.  They are a good compromise between the cheap 20$ pans and the more expensive 200$ pans.

    They are thick enough that they won’t warp under heat like the 20$ pans.

    You should see non-stick as disposable and don’t invest too much IMHO.

    Never use anything else than wood or nylon utensils in them.

    Stick to medium/low heat (never high)

    I also use them almost exclusively for eggs/omelet.

    ____________________
    Entrepreneurs are simply those who understand that there is little difference between obstacle and opportunity and are able to turn both to their advantage. •Niccolo Machiavelli
  • PigBeanUsPigBeanUs Posts: 210
    Protip for finding high grade copper cookware (if you do not want nonstick):

    Homegoods (Marshall’s) or TJMaxx and other similar stores, who resell retail goods as “off-price retail” often have a kitchen section. 

    You'll often see a bunch of faked up copper pots and pans in the traditional french shapes, like omelette pans in this case. 

    But this cheapo stuff is stainless or aluminum or whatever, plated in thin copper plating. It even sometimes has a cut edge, like traditional copper. But if you look at it you will see that the full thickness is the non-copper metal, while the copper plating is just that: plating

    But look closer and you can almost always find real copper pans in among them. 

    When you look at the cut metal edge or rim, an eighth or more of an inch thick, you can see it is all copper, and the traditional tin lining is the plating. 

    The pans are all priced the same. All intermingled. Don’t think I have ever paid more than $25 for an eight or ten inch omelette pan. Heck. Not sure that covers the cost of the copper itself. 

    Cheaper to buy another than have it retinned, even. 

    After that it is proper technique and butter, butter, plus butter, to keep the omelet from sticking. Jacgues Pepin has a video showing both the French and American methods. I suck at both. 

    Problem with teadirional tinned coppr is the tinning can wear off (no metal utensils, no Bon Ami etc).  Normally that’s like $75 to have redone. Or buy another pan at Marshall’s. Plus also, neat freaks will want to clean the copper too (Barkeeper’s Friend is best for that)




  • jtcBoyntonjtcBoynton Posts: 2,745
    don't buy a set.  Buy individual pieces to match your cooking needs. Most of us don't need many.  Consider getting different brands and types.  A cast iron skillet 12", a carbon steel 12", a cheap Teflon coated 12", and a cheap Teflon coated 6-7".  Use the 7" exclusively for eggs at low temps with only silicon tools and it will last for years.  Use the 12" teflon pan again only at lower temps and no metal for general use knowing it will last at most 2 years.  I use T-fal pans for this ($30).  The carbon steel and cast iron will handle your high heat needs, take tool abuse and last a lifetime.
    Southeast Florida - LBGE
    In cooking, often we implement steps for which we have no explanations other than ‘that’s what everybody else does’ or ‘that’s what I have been told.’  Dare to think for yourself.
     
  • JNDATHPJNDATHP Posts: 451
    Thanks everyone. 
    Michael
    Large BGE
    Reno, NV
  • scdafscdaf Posts: 119

    J.A. Henckels International 10-piece Capri Granitium Nonstick Cookware Set 

    I have the 3 piece saute' pan set of these and after about 8 months, they still look and perform like new.  Read somewhere when I got them, to avoid cooking sprays and that seems to work.  Costco has the full set for $250.
  • scdafscdaf Posts: 119
    Make that $200 starting tomorrow.  (Just opened the current Costco flyer)
  • Sweet100sSweet100s Posts: 511
    edited November 23
    paqman said:
    For non-stick specifically, I am partial to the oxo pans.  They are a good compromise between the cheap 20$ pans and the more expensive 200$ pans.

    They are thick enough that they won’t warp under heat like the 20$ pans.

    You should see non-stick as disposable and don’t invest too much IMHO.

    Never use anything else than wood or nylon utensils in them.

    Stick to medium/low heat (never high)

    I also use them almost exclusively for eggs/omelet.
    I came to same conclusion as paqman after several hours of research.

    Purchased Oxo 12” non-stick with the cool handle.    Cook’s Country or Cook’s Illustrated rated it top in their this year rating.  

    Same as paq, use them exclusively for eggs at medium heat.

    Shopping for them was tricky: 
    Bed Bath & Beyond, Macy’s, Target, Amazon, had different models

  • TeefusTeefus Posts: 998
    edited November 23
    Go to a resturant supply and get a couple Lincoln/Vollrath fry pans. They are commercial grade aluminum with or without non-stick and last forever in the home. When I was a line cook we abused these and they hung in there. I cooked 300 eggs every morning and dozens of omelettes. They hold up. Reasonably priced too.
    Michiana, South of the border.
  • BotchBotch Posts: 10,566
    don't buy a set.  Buy individual pieces to match your cooking needs. Most of us don't need many.  Consider getting different brands and types.  A cast iron skillet 12", a carbon steel 12", a cheap Teflon coated 12", and a cheap Teflon coated 6-7".  Use the 7" exclusively for eggs at low temps with only silicon tools and it will last for years.  Use the 12" teflon pan again only at lower temps and no metal for general use knowing it will last at most 2 years.  I use T-fal pans for this ($30).  The carbon steel and cast iron will handle your high heat needs, take tool abuse and last a lifetime.
    The OP mentioned omelettes, and nothing has worked better for me than the T-Fal pans (perfect for fish too); yeah, they do have to be replaced every 8-10 years or so, but at <$30 I can do that.  
     
    And a more General question for you guys, wrt carbon steel pans: I understand that you can season them to give a non-stick surface, but they still have the poor heat distribution of steel; I still remember my mom's burned dishes and scrubbing at the sink, with her stainless-steel set.  What, here, am I missing?  
     
    My woks are carbon-steel and cast-iron, very thin, but with flames licking up on all sides that's okay, heat distribution is not an issue.  And, a perfect, seasoned, non-stick surface that will last forever.  
    ____________________________________________
    Introvert Engineers - Social Distancing before it was cool.  
    Ogden, Utard.  
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