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Gap & paver?

Finished my new table. Was planning on just setting large egg on a paver, until I started reading the multitude of opinions on air gap. Bottom line BGE and most folks suggest the air gap, so I’ve bought a nest to place it in. 

So now...is a paver necessary, would a piece of concrete backer board be enough thermal protection for the 3/4 oak ply or is it safe enough without anymore than the gap that the nest provides?

Comments

  • RRPRRP Posts: 23,312
    Since no one else has answered in 2 hours then I will! - If it were my table and MY HOME at risk then YES I would still add the concrete paver! That concrete backer board is nice - but THIN. Why risk it?
    Re-gasketing America one yard at a time.
  • SonVoltSonVolt Posts: 2,353
    edited July 31
    I would think the air gap provided by the nest is all you need. I had a long come to Jesus conversation with BGE HQ about this very topic and they basically said "leave the paver, grab the cannoli nest". 
    South of Nashville  -  BGE XL  -  Alfresco 42" ALXE  -  Alfresco Versa Burner  - Sunbeam Microwave 
  • StillH2OEggerStillH2OEgger Posts: 2,912
    I won't say definitively that my setup is adequate, but I only have a table nest and it sits on top of a cedar table. I have not noticed any discoloration, nor has it ever felt warm under there when I have checked. Having said that, I don't do a ton of higher heat cooks and the finish on my table is not as nice as yours. Normally I err on the side of caution, but haven't felt the need to go beyond the table nest.
    Stillwater, MN
  • jtcBoyntonjtcBoynton Posts: 2,716
    What is safe enough is a judgement call for you to make. Consider the consequences if something goes wrong. Is the egg located close enough to other flammable structures to be a problem if it cracks a bottom and dumps a load of hot coals?  Wood deck? Wood sided house? Ever leave the egg unattended? 

    Fire bricks in addition to the nest provide better protection. Pavers also provide a bit. Your call on cost vs additional protection. You just need to add enough safety precautions to satisfy your own risk tolerance level. 
    Southeast Florida - LBGE
    In cooking, often we implement steps for which we have no explanations other than ‘that’s what everybody else does’ or ‘that’s what I have been told.’  Dare to think for yourself.
     
  • danlbrowndanlbrown Posts: 46
    Thanks for all of the perspectives. If I had a bit more forethought, I would have built in the extra 2” for the nest. Since I didn’t, and don’t want to destroy the table, I think a 1/4” to 3/16” thick granite tile under the nest for peace of mind without raising the egg another 2” ( thickness of the paver I purchased)

    Thanks again for your thoughts. 
  • fishlessmanfishlessman Posts: 26,177
    i would line the bottom with a sheet of stainless and use the nest
  • Langner91Langner91 Posts: 148
    danlbrown said:
    Thanks for all of the perspectives. If I had a bit more forethought, I would have built in the extra 2” for the nest. Since I didn’t, and don’t want to destroy the table, I think a 1/4” to 3/16” thick granite tile under the nest for peace of mind without raising the egg another 2” ( thickness of the paver I purchased)

    Thanks again for your thoughts. 
    This is exactly what I did.  I bought a large 24"x24" tile at the home improvement store and put it under the egg.  Very little height difference, but I was afraid of a hot coal, ember, or some other issue getting under there and burning my table down.  Seems like overkill, but it only takes minutes for your world to change.

    Clinton, Iowa
  • jtcBoyntonjtcBoynton Posts: 2,716
    danlbrown said:
    Thanks for all of the perspectives. If I had a bit more forethought, I would have built in the extra 2” for the nest. Since I didn’t, and don’t want to destroy the table, I think a 1/4” to 3/16” thick granite tile under the nest for peace of mind without raising the egg another 2” ( thickness of the paver I purchased)

    Thanks again for your thoughts. 
    Look into fire bricks. Not as thick as the  paver you have but much better at slowing down heat transfer. Granite transfers heat readily. 
    Southeast Florida - LBGE
    In cooking, often we implement steps for which we have no explanations other than ‘that’s what everybody else does’ or ‘that’s what I have been told.’  Dare to think for yourself.
     
  • danlbrowndanlbrown Posts: 46
    Jtc, I’ll look for fire brick. Got impatient and used a thinner paver I had. 
       
  • etherdomeetherdome Posts: 427
    Glad you decided to go with an air gap. “Opinions” regarding that subject should not even exist. I can  and have posted  a picture of my burnt table through a paver and many others can too.  Since I discovered the importance of an air gap the hard way, there has been no paver and no damage or problem at all. I also have a nest under my egg with my wooden table directly under it.  I have no evidence to support this but I would hypothesize that as a conductor of heat, even with the air gap there would be more risk of damage with a paver than without.  
    Upstate SC
    Large BGE
  • danlbrowndanlbrown Posts: 46
    Etherdome, cooked on it tonight. 425...felt of the paver and it was cool to the touch. So thanks to all who stated the merits of the airgap. 
  • RyanStlRyanStl Posts: 41
    Looks really, really great.
  • danlbrowndanlbrown Posts: 46
    thanks Ryan. As always... things I might change , but the rustic look fits the setting 
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