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Dry Aged Beef Failure

Codfish
Codfish Posts: 42
I dry aged for one week at 33-37*F. Patted off all moisture and placed on a wire rack on bottom shelf in my beer fridge. Opened door once a day. All sides of beef were very hard and dry. Before frying steaks i dressed with a little oil and s & P.
Beef was tenderloin about eight pounds.Thanks for any suggestions. Codfish.

Comments

  • Photo Egg
    Photo Egg Posts: 12,110
    Dry aging will dry and harden the outside of the beef.
    One week is not long enough to add much to the actual taste or tenderizing.
    Tenderloin has very little fat and is all great meat to start with. No super benefit to age it.
    But I also don't really understand what you didn't like or what you expected that did not happen.
    Dit you start with an untrimmed primal or was it already butcher trimmed?
    Photos?
    Thank you,
    Darian

    Galveston Texas
  • alaskanassasin
    alaskanassasin Posts: 7,500
    What was the failure? What am I missing?
    South of Columbus, Ohio.


  • Codfish
    Codfish Posts: 42
    Thanks Photo-Egg and Alaskanassasin for replying. I thought my beef would taste a little stronger, knowing one week was not long enough. I trimmed the beef, sorry no pictures. I saw that someone did a prime rib, and I substituted the tenderloin, my mistake.
  • WeberWho
    WeberWho Posts: 10,978
    I think the most ideal for dry aging is somewhere between 35 to 50 days. This will also depend on the type of beef you're trying to dry age. 
    "The pig is an amazing animal. You feed a pig an apple and it makes bacon. Let's see Michael Phelps do that" - Jim Gaffigan

    Minnesota
  • Photo Egg
    Photo Egg Posts: 12,110
    Codfish said:
    Thanks Photo-Egg and Alaskanassasin for replying. I thought my beef would taste a little stronger, knowing one week was not long enough. I trimmed the beef, sorry no pictures. I saw that someone did a prime rib, and I substituted the tenderloin, my mistake.
    I think a leaner cut like tenderloin is a better candidate for wet aging.
    I think the results you get from dry aging vary depending on the humidity and airflow that you have in YOUR fridge. My 25 day may yield what someone else gets at 35 days.
    Oh, and yours was not a mistake. Just not something you liked in the end.
    We are all learning from what we try and from what others post here.
    Take care!
    Thank you,
    Darian

    Galveston Texas
  • nolaegghead
    nolaegghead Posts: 42,100
    edited March 2020
    Yes, wet age it.  You need the meat to have some mass and an outer fat layer or bones or membrane covering most of it to keep it from drying up before it ages.
    ______________________________________________
    I love lamp..