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XL Cedar Table with Concrete Top

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Comments

  • alaskanassasin
    alaskanassasin Posts: 7,775
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    What about a ripping a “ground contact” treated 2x4 with a tablesaw with the correct angle and anchor it with tapcons. 
    South of Columbus, Ohio.


  • alaskanassasin
    alaskanassasin Posts: 7,775
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    Cedar would work too.
    South of Columbus, Ohio.


  • JonWesson
    JonWesson Posts: 161
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    teak wood work too.          
    large small and mini all in legal proceedings but i can use them for now no more, all gone                                                                                                                        usa somewhere on the road
  • speed51133
    speed51133 Posts: 691
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    but it's rated for that use.
    XL BGE and Kamado Joe Jr.
  • Mattman3969
    Mattman3969 Posts: 10,457
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    @speed51133 - I would disassemble and cut the bottom off the studs.  Nothing else that you do will be as sturdy or long lasting as this.  Start at your lowest point and work your way backwards.  

    -----------------------------------------

    analyze adapt overcome

    2008 -Large BGE. 2013- Small BGE and 2015 - Mini. Henderson, Ky.
  • speed51133
    speed51133 Posts: 691
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    Yep. That's what I decided on. It's a ****, but beat solution. 
    XL BGE and Kamado Joe Jr.
  • jasonmcmillan
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    how level was your slab? Did you cut the 4x4's differently to accommodate for it? I am having some issues with mine. I need to account for about a 1.5in slope over 9 feet. I was going to use composite shims, but I don't like that idea anymore. I am thinking of forming a mortar wedge on the slab to level it out.
      The slab was definitely on a pitch. I used a clear tube and died water to guesstimate the best I could at how much higher the slab is closer to the house than at the edge.  A 8’ level would have been a lot easier, but didn’t have access to one.  In the end I cut the legs furthest from the house an 1 1/2” taller than the ones close to the house and kinda varied by ¼” increment in between.  This got it pretty close. 
      I did use a cheap pack of shims to level the countertop sitting on the table.  That’s all I really cared to be perfectly level.  Couldn’t have my eggs sliding on the blackstone.  
      Hope that helps and makes sense.  
  • jasonmcmillan
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    After I made that comment I see there was a second page of good suggestions.  Good luck with the build and hope to see some pictures on here eventually.