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Brisket Bust

I know brisket is a fickle beast but I flopped tonight. Decent flavor but dry as a bone. 

I cooked it unwrapped between 225°-250°. 11lb chunk that took about 15 hours. Pulled it at 195° internal and FTC for a couple of hours. 

I am thinking I need to start wrapping it at some point but I am not sure when and how to do so. 

Any input would be greatly appreciated. 

Large BGE Dallas, TX

Comments

  • aemaem Posts: 138
    What grade brisket?  I have much better luck with Prime. I usually don’t foil. 
  • bhuggbhugg Posts: 273
    Choice from sams. That’s what I usually get but I have never had one come out this dry. 
    Large BGE Dallas, TX
  • saluki2007saluki2007 Posts: 4,737
    Don't get down on yourself as we've all had it happen to us. It's possible that it wasn't done yet. You didn't give us enough to go with but the thing about brisket is it's not done at a certain time or temperature. You need to probe the thickest part of the flat until it slides in and out like a hot knife in butter. Some are done at 195 and some are done around 205. Just takes lots of practice to get that feel. 
    Large and Small BGE
    Morton, IL

  • pgprescottpgprescott Posts: 12,458
    lower grade briskets benefit from injections and a foil wrap. It gives you the best window for success. I’m a fan of the commercial injections over the homemade stuff. Butchers and Kosmos are the two brands I have used. They contain phosphates which will aide in moisture retention. Wrapping in double foil @ 155-160 or when you have the bark (rub) set on the brisket will cut the cook time down by almost half and deliver the moistest possible product. Good luck in the future, it happens to all of us sooner or later. 
  • HighSierraEggHighSierraEgg Posts: 15
    edited December 2
    Wrap after the stall in butcher paper. Pull at around 200 and put in good quality cooler to rest.
  • pgprescottpgprescott Posts: 12,458
    Wrap after the stall in butcher paper. Pull at around 200 and put in good quality cooler to rest.
    This is the Franklin method which is great for high grade cuts.

     I still believe foil is better for moisture retention for lower grades which is the issue he described. 
  • Nature BoyNature Boy Posts: 8,623
    We've cooked over 130 competitions on the EGGs in the past 18 years, and it took about 10 competitions before I realized that wrapping yielded a more consistently moist product every time. Not only that, it really helps you hone in your timing.

    For me, the time to wrap is when I've built up all the flavor I want on the outside. Both smoke flavor, as well as sufficient caramelization of the spice bark on the outside. When the bark is right, it's time. For me that's usually around 165-170 internal. I usually add about 1/2 cup coffee or beef stock to the wrap. I use foil, but have nothing against butcher paper.

    One final thought...there is no magic temperature for when a brisket is done. It's done when it's tender. When I reach 190 internal, I open the foil and probe for tenderness. If it's still tight, wrap the foil up again and check again in 15 minutes. Repeat until tender, then get it off right away.

    Happy brisketeering! Chris
    DizzyPigBBQ.com
    Twitter: @dizzypigbbq
    Facebook: Dizzy Pig Seasonings
    Instagram: @DizzyPigBBQ
  • WoadieWoadie Posts: 119
    We've cooked over 130 competitions on the EGGs in the past 18 years, and it took about 10 competitions before I realized that wrapping yielded a more consistently moist product every time. Not only that, it really helps you hone in your timing.

    For me, the time to wrap is when I've built up all the flavor I want on the outside. Both smoke flavor, as well as sufficient caramelization of the spice bark on the outside. When the bark is right, it's time. For me that's usually around 165-170 internal. I usually add about 1/2 cup coffee or beef stock to the wrap. I use foil, but have nothing against butcher paper.

    One final thought...there is no magic temperature for when a brisket is done. It's done when it's tender. When I reach 190 internal, I open the foil and probe for tenderness. If it's still tight, wrap the foil up again and check again in 15 minutes. Repeat until tender, then get it off right away.

    Happy brisketeering! Chris
    I’ve never done a brisket before.  Do you pour the coffee over the brisket or just let it sit in it?
  • Nature BoyNature Boy Posts: 8,623
    I just pour it in the foil under the brisket. It kinda sits in it. I don't want to risk washing off the bark :) Cheers!

    DizzyPigBBQ.com
    Twitter: @dizzypigbbq
    Facebook: Dizzy Pig Seasonings
    Instagram: @DizzyPigBBQ
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