Big Green Egg - EGGhead Forum - The Ultimate Cooking Experience...
Welcome to the EGGhead Forum - a great place to visit and packed with tips and EGGspert advice! You can also join the conversation and get more information and amazing kamado recipes by following Big Green Egg at:

Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Instagram  |  Pinterest  |  Youtube  |  Vimeo
Share your photos by tagging us and using the hashtag #EGGhead4Life.


In Atlanta? Come visit Big Green Egg headquarters, including our retail showroom, the History of the EGG Museum and Culinary Center!  3786 DeKalb Technology Parkway, Atlanta, GA 30340.

OT - Knife sharpener advice - OT

Greetings-

SWMBO was kind enough to get me this Wusthof 3 stone knife sharpener. Does anyone have any experience with this item and if so do you have any advice/tips about using it? Any information would be appreciated.

Cheers,
Chris
St. Louis, MO
Unit 1: LBGE, cedar table Unit 2:Akorn

Comments

  • Search YouTube videos for sharpening with stones. Lots of good advice and description of several approaches there. Start with the coarse stone and work your way up to the finest. You might also want a steel, which hones the blade and keeps it straight between sharpenings. Consistent blade angle during stone sharpening is essential. It takes some practice. It can also be messy, as a slurry will develop while you sharpen. I have found traces of splatter on my ceilings in the past. 
  • You shouldn’t need a steel to hone with that setup. The smoothest of these looks like a ceramic extra fine type of stone. You can hone on that. I’ve not used this brand, but have a two-ceramic stone set from spyderco- brown coarse and white fine sticks. For most of the kitchen stuff I do, I just “semi-hone” on the brown one as it’s fairly smooth. I don’t actually hone (going from the shoulder of the bevel to the edge), but just touch up to bevel by sharpening the blade briefly. Just be careful not to roll the blade off the stone.

    Watch some of the wood carving knife sharpening videos to see how they start and end a sharpening stroke. Most pick up the blade to repeat or to flip over to the other side. One guy I’ve seen even “rolls the knife over on its back to get to the other side without screwing up the bevel angle. I do mostly chip carving now, so I drag a blade over a white ceramic stone - 1200 grit I think, back and forth to polish it.Rarely do I have to resharpen those blades and they are scary sharp!
    Good luck and nice score on the kit.
  • EggcelsiorEggcelsior Posts: 14,186
    You can stack 3 pennies and set the knife on it with the edge on the stone to get a 15-20 degree angle. That way you have an idea of the angle for building muscle memory.
  • GrateEggspectationsGrateEggspectations Posts: 2,568
    edited January 12
    You shouldn’t need a steel to hone with that setup. The smoothest of these looks like a ceramic extra fine type of stone. You can hone on that. I’ve not used this brand, but have a two-ceramic stone set from spyderco- brown coarse and white fine sticks. For most of the kitchen stuff I do, I just “semi-hone” on the brown one as it’s fairly smooth. I don’t actually hone (going from the shoulder of the bevel to the edge), but just touch up to bevel by sharpening the blade briefly. Just be careful not to roll the blade off the stone.

    Watch some of the wood carving knife sharpening videos to see how they start and end a sharpening stroke. Most pick up the blade to repeat or to flip over to the other side. One guy I’ve seen even “rolls the knife over on its back to get to the other side without screwing up the bevel angle. I do mostly chip carving now, so I drag a blade over a white ceramic stone - 1200 grit I think, back and forth to polish it.Rarely do I have to resharpen those blades and they are scary sharp!
    Good luck and nice score on the kit.
    I hear you that you can hone with the finest grit, but will the OP really want to have to get the blade wet (water or oil on the stone) every time he wants to hone? Probably not. Stones take quite a while to dry. A good steel is very helpful in between sharpenings and can be used (dry) before and/or after every knife use. 
  • MacPaMacPa Posts: 7
    Stones need oil, Mineral oil works. Buy a cheap 2 dollar 6 inch knife and practice with that before using on a good wusthof it will payoff in the long run. You may want a 5X eye loop to see your progress. I bought my first 3 stone set 40 years ago. About 15 years ago I switched to diamonds and love them. instead of oil diamond need only water, I use Windex its cheap and cleanup is even easier.
Sign In or Register to comment.
Click here for Forum Use Guidelines.