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Reverse sear question

Are there pros/cons to during the first phase of the reverse sear at different temps. For example, does 200 degrees to an internal temp of 125 produce better results than 300 degrees to 125?

I'll probably do a scientific study at some point, but wanted to get your thoughts anyway.

Comments

  • SSQUAL612SSQUAL612 Posts: 1,047
    I’ve always done 250 & pull at 120 IT for the resting portion. 
    Temple, TX   XL BGE 2016, MES, 18.5 WSM,  36"&17" Black Stone, Adj Rig, Woo, Grill Grates, SS Smokeware Cap, KAB,  FB 300, Thermapen 
  • derka123derka123 Posts: 88
    Oh and let me hijack my own thread with another question. Is it possible to have too high a temp during the sear process on the egg; for example, should I always target ~700, or are there benefits to running it nuclear at say 900 or 1000 degrees?
  • deanb1234deanb1234 Posts: 16
    edited April 13
    Oh and let me hijack my own thread with another question. Is it possible to have too high a temp during the sear process on the egg; for example, should I always target ~700, or are there benefits to running it nuclear at say 900 or 1000 degrees?


    My dome thermometer broke once and I was about to sear some huge thick rib eyes and for some reason I couldn't get it above 500 degrees and yet the heat still almost knocked me over.  Afterwards I got my infrared thermometer out and checked the temps and it was reading 1200 at the dome and like 1400 on the grates.  :o

    But needless to say those huge rib eyes curled up like a thin strip of bacon and made a bowl shape.  First time I ever saw something like that.  And the meat was like shoe leather. 

    After that I make sure I'm not going over 700-750

     =) 


    Georgetown, KY.  XL BGE, Akorn Jr, Grillgrates, Smokeware Cap, & Kick Ash Basket.
  • buzd504buzd504 Posts: 2,669
    derka123 said:
    Are there pros/cons to during the first phase of the reverse sear at different temps. For example, does 200 degrees to an internal temp of 125 produce better results than 300 degrees to 125?

    I'll probably do a scientific study at some point, but wanted to get your thoughts anyway.
    The idea is get a uniform cook throughout the meat and the best way to do that is through lower temperatures.  The higher the temp of the fire/egg, the more likely you are overcook the outer portion of the meat.  So it becomes a practical question with regards to how much time and patience you have to maintain a low temperature vs when you want your steak to be done.  300 will certainly work, but lower is better.
    NOLA
  • buzd504buzd504 Posts: 2,669
    derka123 said:
    Oh and let me hijack my own thread with another question. Is it possible to have too high a temp during the sear process on the egg; for example, should I always target ~700, or are there benefits to running it nuclear at say 900 or 1000 degrees?
    Not really, but there is a certain temp where you are more burning the outside of the meat than getting a mailliard reaction.  If you look at people that do the cowboy method (directly on hot coals) they are actually exposing the meat to much higher temperatures than that.  It will mostly come down to which temp (and equipment, like cast iron) give you results that you like.

    I will say that if you are using any seasoning other than salt, you are probably burning your spices at those super-high temps (over 500).
    NOLA
  • GoooDawgsGoooDawgs Posts: 753
    @buzd504 so if you add a rub to a reverse seared steak do you put it on AFTER the sear? I go back and forth between doing that and letting the meat rest on the counter with the rub on prior to roasting it, and then knocking the rub that hasn't absorbed off before I go to sear.    What's your method for adding rub? 
    Milton, GA 
    XL BGE & FB300
  • buzd504buzd504 Posts: 2,669
    GoooDawgs said:
    @buzd504 so if you add a rub to a reverse seared steak do you put it on AFTER the sear? I go back and forth between doing that and letting the meat rest on the counter with the rub on prior to roasting it, and then knocking the rub that hasn't absorbed off before I go to sear.    What's your method for adding rub? 
    Honestly, I don't really like rub on a steak.  I like salt and pepper, and I add the pepper after searing. 


    If I were to add rub, I would sear at a lower temperature (and pull earlier from the initial cook)/
    NOLA
  • StillH2OEggerStillH2OEgger Posts: 2,048
    edited April 13
    I can get wall-to-wall pink at 250 so I've never seen a reason to try another temp for the first part of the cook. Having said that, if time is an issue I'm you can get reasonably good results at a higher temp. Also, it always seems to be a badge of honor to sear at the highest temp possible, but you can get a great crust at 500-550 degrees.
    Stillwater, MN
  • bgebrentbgebrent Posts: 17,481
    You should consider SV cooking.
    Sandy Springs & Dawsonville Ga
  • blind99blind99 Posts: 4,346
    bgebrent said:
    You should consider SV cooking.
    @bgebrent what’s that?
    Chicago, IL - Large and Small BGE - Weber Gasser and Kettle
  • bgebrentbgebrent Posts: 17,481
    blind99 said:
    bgebrent said:
    You should consider SV cooking.
    @bgebrent what’s that?
    SV stands for Sucking down Vodka whilst you cook your food.  Used to be known as SDV.  Youngsters today have a different lingo.
    Sandy Springs & Dawsonville Ga
  • SSQUAL612SSQUAL612 Posts: 1,047
    I can get wall-to-wall pink at 250 so I've never seen a reason to try another temp for the first part of the cook. Having said that, if time is an issue I'm you can get reasonably good results at a higher temp. Also, it always seems to be a badge of honor to sear at the highest temp possible, but you can get a great crust at 500-550 degrees.
    I did a bone in NY recently at 300 for the first part of the cook & did not like the result near as much as what 250 produced.  I season with Course Sea Salt & Pepper while bringing to room temp & cook on a rack on a baking sheet then rest for 15 minutes once I’ve achieved my internal target temp.  I’ve seared in a CI skillet on the stove top with a small amount of Ghee & enjoyed the final result. 
    Temple, TX   XL BGE 2016, MES, 18.5 WSM,  36"&17" Black Stone, Adj Rig, Woo, Grill Grates, SS Smokeware Cap, KAB,  FB 300, Thermapen 
  • jtcBoyntonjtcBoynton Posts: 2,227
    derka123 said:
    Are there pros/cons to during the first phase of the reverse sear at different temps. For example, does 200 degrees to an internal temp of 125 produce better results than 300 degrees to 125?
    YES.  The purpose of the low temp portion of the cook is to get a uniform doneness on the inside of the meat.  Higher temps create internal temp gradients.  

    derka123 said:
    Oh and let me hijack my own thread with another question. Is it possible to have too high a temp during the sear process on the egg; for example, should I always target ~700, or are there benefits to running it nuclear at say 900 or 1000 degrees?
    Not really.  With higher temps the time needed is shorter. Dome temp isn't really what is important. You need a lot of radiant heat hitting the surface of the meat.  You need a good amount of fully involved charcoal with the meat down close to the coals.  The air temp up in the dome isn't what is searing the meat. You can get plenty of radiant heat next to the coals long before the dome temp goes nuclear.



    Southeast Florida - LBGE
    In cooking, often we implement steps for which we have no explanations other than ‘that’s what everybody else does’ or ‘that’s what I have been told.’  Dare to think for yourself.
     
  • derka123derka123 Posts: 88
    Alright guys here we go. Cooked to 125 in the oven, cranked the egg to 800, seared for 45 seconds per side. Steak came out awesome, got it done just in the nick of time (thunderstorm rolling in as I type this).


  • FrostyEggFrostyEgg Posts: 229
    I can get wall-to-wall pink at 250 so I've never seen a reason to try another temp for the first part of the cook. Having said that, if time is an issue I'm you can get reasonably good results at a higher temp. Also, it always seems to be a badge of honor to sear at the highest temp possible, but you can get a great crust at 500-550 degrees.
    This. 250 until 115-120 IT, rest for 10 minutes while the egg gets hot, then sear.
  • deanb1234deanb1234 Posts: 16
    FrostyEgg said:
    I can get wall-to-wall pink at 250 so I've never seen a reason to try another temp for the first part of the cook. Having said that, if time is an issue I'm you can get reasonably good results at a higher temp. Also, it always seems to be a badge of honor to sear at the highest temp possible, but you can get a great crust at 500-550 degrees.
    This. 250 until 115-120 IT, rest for 10 minutes while the egg gets hot, then sear.
    That's exactly how I reverse sear. I also throw on some Hickory wood to give them a nice smokey flavor. 
    Georgetown, KY.  XL BGE, Akorn Jr, Grillgrates, Smokeware Cap, & Kick Ash Basket.
  • FockerFocker Posts: 8,364
    edited April 14
    200-250 until 120, rest.  Like brisket, searing is overrated.


    Brandon
    Quad Cities
    "If yer gonna denigrate, familiarity with the subject is helpful."

  • FrostyEggFrostyEgg Posts: 229
    Focker said:
    200-250 until 120, rest.  Like brisket, searing is overrated.


    Is that dry aged at all? Looks absolutely incredible!
  • SSQUAL612SSQUAL612 Posts: 1,047
    Focker said:
    200-250 until 120, rest.  Like brisket, searing is overrated.


    What did you use for cooking this?   Looks amazing.
    Temple, TX   XL BGE 2016, MES, 18.5 WSM,  36"&17" Black Stone, Adj Rig, Woo, Grill Grates, SS Smokeware Cap, KAB,  FB 300, Thermapen 
  • lousubcaplousubcap Posts: 17,991
    As above, the lower the initial cook temp the more uniform the meat cross-section.  I finish the reverse sear caveman style.  Full open the bottom vent, open the dome, pull the guts and wait (doesn't take long) for a good bed of lava like coals.  Then on goes the steak, flip after around 30 seconds.  Use a  very quick read thermo and pull when you have the crust.  FWIW-
    Louisville;  L & S BGEs, PBC, Lang 36; Burnin' wood in the neighbourhood. # 38 for the win.  Life is too short for light/lite beer.  
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