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Need help foiling a pork butt!

I know a lot of people don't like foiling, and in the past I've not done it for a pork butt, but in the interest of time I had to foil mine this afternoon (we've got people coming over and I'm running behind). I usually go for a temp of 203 internal. Do I keep it foiled all the way to there? Or do I pull it out at around 195 and throw it back on without foil to tighten up any lost bark from the foiled environment for the final 10 degrees? 

Thanks for you help!
Southern California

Comments

  • saluki2007saluki2007 Posts: 3,884
    I think you answered your own question.  What was the IT when you wrapped?  If you want to bring any bark back I would pull the foil and bump your temps up to around 300. 
    Large and Small BGE
    Morton, IL

  • bikesAndBBQbikesAndBBQ Posts: 215
    Crank the egg’s temperature. Pork handles 300+ without issue. Just keep it under 350 or the sugar will burn. I usually pull at 195-197 and hold for a little. It always falls apart. If the bone wiggles free, it is done. 
    Pittsburgh, PA. LBGE
  • bicktravbicktrav Posts: 503
    Crank the egg’s temperature. Pork handles 300+ without issue. Just keep it under 350 or the sugar will burn. I usually pull at 195-197 and hold for a little. It always falls apart. If the bone wiggles free, it is done. 
    Are you saying to crank the heat up without the foil on or with it on? It's currently wrapped in foil (again, to quicken the cook). If I keep it in foil and pull at 195-7, then hold it in there for an hour or so, should I toss it back on the egg to thicken the bark before serving?
    Southern California
  • bicktravbicktrav Posts: 503

    I think you answered your own question.  What was the IT when you wrapped?  If you want to bring any bark back I would pull the foil and bump your temps up to around 300. 
    IT was 150 when I wrapped. Should I pull the foil and throw it back on a few degrees shy of my target temp, which is 203? 
    Southern California
  • FHawkFHawk Posts: 10
    Yes, remove the foil shy of your target temp and let the BGE do it's thing.....   $0.02
    Large BGE, Medium BGE, Small BGE, Large Grill Dome, Large Kamado (2), Small Imperial Kamado.
    Huntsville, AL
    RTR !
  • bikesAndBBQbikesAndBBQ Posts: 215
    bicktrav said:
    Crank the egg’s temperature. Pork handles 300+ without issue. Just keep it under 350 or the sugar will burn. I usually pull at 195-197 and hold for a little. It always falls apart. If the bone wiggles free, it is done. 
    Are you saying to crank the heat up without the foil on or with it on? It's currently wrapped in foil (again, to quicken the cook). If I keep it in foil and pull at 195-7, then hold it in there for an hour or so, should I toss it back on the egg to thicken the bark before serving?
    Crank the temp without the foil is my suggestion. 
    Pittsburgh, PA. LBGE
  • domcofdomcof Posts: 5
    Has anybody used butcher paper in lieu of foil? I have read that with paper you maintain the bark. 
    Mall the benefits of foil with none of the negatives. I just bought a roll but have not tried it yet. 
  • bikesAndBBQbikesAndBBQ Posts: 215
    I guess why do you want to wrap in butcher’s paper?  What benefits are you hoping to gain?
    Pittsburgh, PA. LBGE
  • domcofdomcof Posts: 5
    I’ve just reading about pink butcher paper from several sources and on YouTube.

    From another forum:”Butcher paper will take your beef ribs, brisket and pork to the next level
    Until now tin foil is the goto for wrapping meat during or just as it's leaving the stall (the point where the meat collagens start to melt away). This poses a few problems, it's pretty much air tight meaning that bark on the meat you've spent hours developing will go soggy and start to steam. Tin foil can also contain chemicals you dont want near your food. 
    In comes butcher paper, this will retain most the heat but allow the meat to breathe, while keeping plenty of moister, maintaining that lovely thick bark.”

    I cant vouch for or against it...the reason I’m asking. 
  • bikesAndBBQbikesAndBBQ Posts: 215
    I don’t feel wrapping anything on the egg is all that beneficial. I don’t think wrapping pork adds anything at all. If you don’t like a crunchy bark, then I would consider it. If you are worried about time or a long stall, pork handles 300+ with no issues. That takes care of the stall and gets the time down to 30-45 minutes a pound. I tried wrapping a brisket in butchers paper once and saw little to no difference with the ones I didn’t wrap. I am by no means a brisket expert. I also don’t like the added work of wrapping. The egg holds moisture very well. I leave it shut and let it do its thing. Try wrapping and see what you think. A lot wrap and a lot don’t. It is a preference thing. 
    Pittsburgh, PA. LBGE
  • BikerBobBikerBob Posts: 235
    When I've tried to short cut cook time with foil and increased temp for butts, the outcome was never good. I now try to leave an extra time when doing and extended cook and FTM (that's foil, towel and microwave-it's good place to store a butt when oven is in use.)















    Cooking on the coast
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