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Cast iron Dutch oven or ceramic coated?

hello everyone
im gonna get a 7 quart Dutch oven for my Large BGE.i was able to find some pretty old discussions on this but nothing new.il probably be using it for chili and pot roasts mostly.i read about a bitter taste when making chili in the non ceramic cast iron.years ago I made a lot of chili in a cast iron pot on a stove top and didn’t notice it but maybe the bitter taste comes when your baking the whole thing inside the egg? And then should I get one with the legs on the bottom?as always I appreciate any feedback
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Comments

  • fishlessmanfishlessman Posts: 22,993
    im fine with the real texas chili in regular cast iron, no beans no tomatoes. add tomatoes and i want an enameled dutch. pot roast does better in regular cast iron for whatever reason.  i need one of each, places like target and marshals sometimes carry inexpensive enameled dutch ovens
  • @fishlessman should a guy go with the ones with the short legs ? I’m not sure if the ceramic ones have those legs or not.
  • fishlessmanfishlessman Posts: 22,993
    @fishlessman should a guy go with the ones with the short legs ? I’m not sure if the ceramic ones have those legs or not.
    i use both,  if you want to use it indoors you wont want the legs.  indirect setup needs to be lifted up so legs work or you can just use spacers. direct works well too. temps are just under 300 dome for direct cooking, just above 300 indirect cooking. make adjustments watching the simmer, not the dome temp, the dome temp will not be accurate with a dutch and liquid in there
  • stlcharcoalstlcharcoal Posts: 3,057
    Look at the 5.5 quart oval on BGE sells.  It's awesome.  Fits the curve of a Large BGE so you don't lose grilling space like with a round one, short enough that you can close the lid with it 1/2" from the wall, and the lid doubles as an au gratin dish!!  And they're only about $140 compared to the same size at $200+ from Le Creuset.  Nothing against those guys--I have several--but this thing is made for the Egg.  Very impressed!

    http://biggreenegg.com/product/enameled-cast-iron-oval-dutch-oven/

  • northGAcocknorthGAcock Posts: 10,017
    I see the  cast (non enameled) as a more versatile vessel. I use mine camping as well as on the egg. The one thing to be aware of (Fishless points out) that acidity from tomatoes can erode your seasoning. I use mine for cooking and remove when served. It is not advised as a storage vessel once you complete your meal. You can't go wrong with either, but for my money, the cast is more versatile and easier to keep clean. I am in the straight up cast camp myself.
    Columbia, South Carolina with a Medium, MiniMax & a 17" Blackstone

    Talk-in' 'bout, hey now! Hey now! I-ko, I-ko, un-day
    Jock-a-mo fee-no ai na-né, jock-a-mo fee na-né

  • tenpenny_05tenpenny_05 Posts: 209
    I picked up a cast aluminum pot with non stick coating for $1 at goodwill for chili. Use it all the time!
    Kansas City, Kansas
    Second hand Medium BGE, Second hand Weber Kettle, Second hand Weber Smokey Mountain
  • fishlessmanfishlessman Posts: 22,993
    I see the  cast (non enameled) as a more versatile vessel. I use mine camping as well as on the egg. The one thing to be aware of (Fishless points out) that acidity from tomatoes can erode your seasoning. I use mine for cooking and remove when served. It is not advised as a storage vessel once you complete your meal. You can't go wrong with either, but for my money, the cast is more versatile and easier to keep clean. I am in the straight up cast camp myself.
    and what i like more with the enameled is i can store food in it in the fridge =) 
  • GoooDawgsGoooDawgs Posts: 653
    I was given the ceramic BGE dutch oven for Christmas but not sure what to use it for.  If you leave the top on, what's the difference in putting this in the BGE compared to the oven?  Does it pick-up the smoke flavor through the ceramic?? 
    Milton, GA 
    XL BGE & FB300
  • kweitzkweitz Posts: 275
    @stlcharcoal - Do you happen to know who makes the ceramic DO for BGE?

    Charles Town, West-by-God Virginia

    Sazco large Casa-Q

    Large BGE

  • northGAcocknorthGAcock Posts: 10,017
    I see the  cast (non enameled) as a more versatile vessel. I use mine camping as well as on the egg. The one thing to be aware of (Fishless points out) that acidity from tomatoes can erode your seasoning. I use mine for cooking and remove when served. It is not advised as a storage vessel once you complete your meal. You can't go wrong with either, but for my money, the cast is more versatile and easier to keep clean. I am in the straight up cast camp myself.
    and what i like more with the enameled is i can store food in it in the fridge =) 
    LOL....Fish I delegate the storage maneuver to my wife. Not and issue with me. Happy New Year brother.
    Columbia, South Carolina with a Medium, MiniMax & a 17" Blackstone

    Talk-in' 'bout, hey now! Hey now! I-ko, I-ko, un-day
    Jock-a-mo fee-no ai na-né, jock-a-mo fee na-né

  • pgprescottpgprescott Posts: 10,522
    Both are great additions. Being lazy, I prefer the enameled. 
  • blastingblasting Posts: 5,492

    Dutch ovens are great cooking vessels, and I'd suggest both.  Some things are better suited to raw cast, some better for enameled, and much doesn't matter.  When it doesn't matter, I'll grab non enameled, since i don't need to worry about being as careful.  

    You asked about legs.  Legs are not well suited for the egg - different application.
    Phoenix 
  • gdenbygdenby Posts: 5,937
    Upsides of plain cast iron, doesn't show smoke stains, can come w. feet for sitting on embers. Old ones come polished smooth for best non stick. Down sides, easy to ruin the seasoning particularly w. acidic foods, and then get rust.

    Enameled, look nicer on the table, no fuss cleaning. Down side, the enamel can chip, and w. years of use (like 50) will become abraded, pitted, and harder to clean.
  • stlcharcoalstlcharcoal Posts: 3,057
    kweitz said:
    @stlcharcoal - Do you happen to know who makes the ceramic DO for BGE?

    No idea, but it's not ceramic.  It's enamel coated cast iron.
  • mEGG_My_DaymEGG_My_Day Posts: 505
    If I only had one, I would get enameled, so acidic foods were not a problem.  Someone on this forum got a great deal at Tuesday Morning not long ago.  You may want to check there if you have Tuesday Morning. 
    Memphis, TN 
  • Sure appreciate all the help everyone!!!
    looks like I need both and maybe a third as I really like that big green egg oval 
  • TeefusTeefus Posts: 602
    I've made a number of batches of chili in my cast iron oven (both stove top, over a fire, and on the egg). I've never sensed bitterness, but it is well seasoned.


    Michiana, South of the border.
  • GrateEggspectationsGrateEggspectations Posts: 1,944
    edited January 3
    I’ve used both enameled Le Creusets and regular CI on the Egg. While they will perform in the same manner, my strong preference is for plain CI on account of the ease of cleaning the vessel. Charcoal soot creates quite a mess of enameled CI. While it will clean right up, it requires a surprising and significant amount of elbow grease. I now use a plain CI Dutch oven for the Egg on a regular basis on the Egg - this way, I don’t worry about cleaning the exterior at all.

    Don't forget that enamel also chips. I cringe at the though of catching a pricey Le Creuset or Staub on the lip of the base!
  • Carolina QCarolina Q Posts: 12,994
    I recently bought a 6.5 qt Tramontina enameled DO for about $35. Only good to 450° which I didn't realize at the time, but that should be plenty. So far, I love it! Haven't used it on the egg yet. Probably won't as I have non enameled CI as well. I also have a 3.5 qt Le Creuset DO. Haven't used that in the egg either.

    Supposedly, you can smear liquid dish soap over the outside of such a pot before placing it in the egg and it'll clean up easily. I've never tried it.

    I hate it when I go to the kitchen for food and all I find are ingredients!

                                                                …Unknown

    Michael 
    Central Connecticut 

  • HubHub Posts: 658
    I'm a huge cast iron fan and use my cast iron dutch oven often.  However, for anything tomato based or anything involving any kind of sweet sauce, I would suggest the enamel. 
    Beautiful and lovely Villa Rica, Georgia
  • FockerFocker Posts: 8,268
    edited January 4
    I will echo @blasting and recommend both.

    I have a #12 Lodge CI DO with legs.  I prefer the legs, as it's more versatile.  You can run it indirect on the grid, legs going between the grids, or, my preferred setup for the bigger DOs, directly on the platesetter.  

    That 5.5 qt oval double dutch is a sweet set for $140, getting the oval baker as the lid.  It needs to be bigger though.  I use a 5 qt DO in the small egg.

    If I had to have one size, it would be the 7 qt.
    Brandon
    Quad Cities
    "If yer gonna denigrate, familiarity with the subject is helpful."

  • RRPRRP Posts: 22,048
    Focker said:
    I will echo @blasting and recommend both.

    I have a #12 Lodge CI DO with legs.  I prefer the legs, as it's more versatile.  You can run it indirect on the grid, legs going between the grids, or, my preferred setup for the bigger DOs, directly on the platesetter.  

    That 5.5 qt oval double dutch is a sweet set for $140, getting the oval baker as the lid. 

    If I had to have one size, it would be the 7 qt.
    Hey, bud....M&M PotatoHead has been looking for you over on .greeneggers.com - in fact both I and now Staci are trying to reach you.
    L, M, S, &  Mini
    And oh yes...also a 17" BlackStone gas fired griddle! 
    Ron
    Dunlap, IL
    Re- gasketing AMERICA one yard at a time!
  • FockerFocker Posts: 8,268
    RRP said:
    Focker said:
    I will echo @blasting and recommend both.

    I have a #12 Lodge CI DO with legs.  I prefer the legs, as it's more versatile.  You can run it indirect on the grid, legs going between the grids, or, my preferred setup for the bigger DOs, directly on the platesetter.  

    That 5.5 qt oval double dutch is a sweet set for $140, getting the oval baker as the lid. 

    If I had to have one size, it would be the 7 qt.
    Hey, bud....M&M PotatoHead has been looking for you over on .greeneggers.com - in fact both I and now Staci are trying to reach you.
    Thanks Ron.  I will get in touch with Jer.
    Brandon
    Quad Cities
    "If yer gonna denigrate, familiarity with the subject is helpful."

  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 26,662
    I see the  cast (non enameled) as a more versatile vessel. I use mine camping as well as on the egg. The one thing to be aware of (Fishless points out) that acidity from tomatoes can erode your seasoning. I use mine for cooking and remove when served. It is not advised as a storage vessel once you complete your meal. You can't go wrong with either, but for my money, the cast is more versatile and easier to keep clean. I am in the straight up cast camp myself.
    I wouldn't worry about acidic foods.  I wouldn't boil vinegar in it, but other than that it isn't a real problem. 

    One of the myths about cast iron is acidic foods like tomatoes can break down the seasoning.  This is false.  The seasoning is polymerized oil, it's pretty tough stuff, technically a plastic. The seasoning protects the iron from the food, and where it's missing (chipped, scraped, etc), it is true acidic foods leach iron out of the pot faster. 

    Also, tomatoes aren't particularly acidic compared to other fruits.

    https://foodsafety.wisc.edu/business_food/files/Approximate_pH.pdf

    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.  Love me or hate me, I am forum Marmite.
    Large and Medium BGE, Kamado Joe Jr, Akorn Jr, smoker with a 5k btu AC, gas grill, fire pit, pack of angry cats, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.  Registered republican.
    New Orleans, LA - we know how to eat 

  • FarmingPhDFarmingPhD Posts: 37

    The seasoning is polymerized oil, it's pretty tough stuff, technically a plastic.

    That is cool to know, thanks for sharing that tidbit.
  • WoodchunkWoodchunk Posts: 638
    edited January 4
    BJ's has had one in store for awhile now for 40$. Oval shape and no legs


    This 7-quart cast iron Dutch oven has a long-lasting 3-layer enamel coating and a flat base for even heat distribution. Compatible with gas, electric, ceramic glass and induction cooktops, the Dutch oven is oven-safe to 500°F. Choose from vibrant blue or red colors. 
  • fishlessmanfishlessman Posts: 22,993
    I see the  cast (non enameled) as a more versatile vessel. I use mine camping as well as on the egg. The one thing to be aware of (Fishless points out) that acidity from tomatoes can erode your seasoning. I use mine for cooking and remove when served. It is not advised as a storage vessel once you complete your meal. You can't go wrong with either, but for my money, the cast is more versatile and easier to keep clean. I am in the straight up cast camp myself.
    I wouldn't worry about acidic foods.  I wouldn't boil vinegar in it, but other than that it isn't a real problem. 

    One of the myths about cast iron is acidic foods like tomatoes can break down the seasoning.  This is false.  The seasoning is polymerized oil, it's pretty tough stuff, technically a plastic. The seasoning protects the iron from the food, and where it's missing (chipped, scraped, etc), it is true acidic foods leach iron out of the pot faster. 

    Also, tomatoes aren't particularly acidic compared to other fruits.

    https://foodsafety.wisc.edu/business_food/files/Approximate_pH.pdf

    ive managed to remove the seasoning on a well seasoned, preseasoned lodge cast iron making tomato sauce from scratch. ive also managed to remove the enamel in a coated cast iron making pretzels =) and thats no lye
  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 26,662
    I see the  cast (non enameled) as a more versatile vessel. I use mine camping as well as on the egg. The one thing to be aware of (Fishless points out) that acidity from tomatoes can erode your seasoning. I use mine for cooking and remove when served. It is not advised as a storage vessel once you complete your meal. You can't go wrong with either, but for my money, the cast is more versatile and easier to keep clean. I am in the straight up cast camp myself.
    I wouldn't worry about acidic foods.  I wouldn't boil vinegar in it, but other than that it isn't a real problem. 

    One of the myths about cast iron is acidic foods like tomatoes can break down the seasoning.  This is false.  The seasoning is polymerized oil, it's pretty tough stuff, technically a plastic. The seasoning protects the iron from the food, and where it's missing (chipped, scraped, etc), it is true acidic foods leach iron out of the pot faster. 

    Also, tomatoes aren't particularly acidic compared to other fruits.

    https://foodsafety.wisc.edu/business_food/files/Approximate_pH.pdf

    ive managed to remove the seasoning on a well seasoned, preseasoned lodge cast iron making tomato sauce from scratch. ive also managed to remove the enamel in a coated cast iron making pretzels =) and thats no lye
    @fishlessman

    Lye - sodium/calcium/potassium hydroxide is very caustic.  That's a job for SS.

    From https://www.thekitchn.com/5-myths-of-cast-iron-cookware-206831

    Myth #2: You should never cook tomatoes and other acidic foods in cast iron.

    A well-seasoned pan can handle acidic foods with impunity. Mark does caution, though, against jumping into menu plans with tomatoes while using a newly purchased Lodge product. "If the seasoning is very good, you can prepare dishes with tomatoes and other acidic foods, but it’s best to wait until your piece is well-seasoned." Recipes including very acidic foods, like tomatoes and citrus juices, should not be cooked in seasoned cast iron until the cookware is highly seasoned. The high acidity of these foods will strip the seasoning and result in discoloration and metallic-tasting food.



    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.  Love me or hate me, I am forum Marmite.
    Large and Medium BGE, Kamado Joe Jr, Akorn Jr, smoker with a 5k btu AC, gas grill, fire pit, pack of angry cats, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.  Registered republican.
    New Orleans, LA - we know how to eat 

  • Just bought a 10qt cast iron pot at an antique shop that I am in the process of cleaning up for Texas style chili on the BGE 
    Large BGE 2013, Minimax 2018 
    Cedar table
    Burlington, Ontario 
  • GulfcoastguyGulfcoastguy Posts: 1,656
    Look at the 5.5 quart oval on BGE sells.  It's awesome.  Fits the curve of a Large BGE so you don't lose grilling space like with a round one, short enough that you can close the lid with it 1/2" from the wall, and the lid doubles as an au gratin dish!!  And they're only about $140 compared to the same size at $200+ from Le Creuset.  Nothing against those guys--I have several--but this thing is made for the Egg.  Very impressed!

    http://biggreenegg.com/product/enameled-cast-iron-oval-dutch-oven/

    Do they happen to make one that fits a medium?
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