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Smoked Whole Chicken - Help

I have attempted to smoke a whole chicken and does not appear to be completely cooked.    My process is to put a dry rub under the skin while soaking apple chunks for :30 mins.  I get the egg to 200' and place a metal disposable pan with water in it on top of the primary grate.   I place the upside down rib rack in the pan with the chicken about 2" above the water.   I have been letting the chicken smoke for about 3 hours @ 200' while adding new chunks periodically.   While the chicken is incredible moist, it still has a slight shade of pink it and the more I cut into it, the less done it appears.   Any feedback on any step of the process would  be greatly appreciated.  Thank you - Ricky Bobby
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Comments

  • LegumeLegume Posts: 8,212
    What temp is the chicken when you pull it off?
    Austin, TX
  • GATravellerGATraveller Posts: 5,414
    Get a meat thermometer and stick it in the thickest part of the breast and thigh - it's ready when the temp reads 165.

    "Social media gives legions of idiots the right to speak when they once only spoke at a bar after a glass of wine, without harming the community [...] but now they have the same right to speak as a Nobel Prize winner. It's the invasion of the idiots."

                                                                                  -Umberto Eco

    2 Large
    Peachtree Corners, GA
  • Mattman3969Mattman3969 Posts: 8,050
    edited March 2017
    I do a lot of low n slow spatched chickens but I cook them at 250° or so raise about 4" above the felt and it takes anywhere from 4-5hrs depending on the bird.  The water in the pan is not necessary in an Egg and only retards cooking(more like steaming).  I'm doubting you chicken are done but could be wrong.   What was the temp of the bird when you pulled from the egg?  

    -----------------------------------------


    2008 -Large BGE. 2013- Small BGE and 2015 - Mini. Henderson, Ky.
  • Thank you both   I am at altitude now, 6k ft, and I am not getting an accurate read on my manual thermometer so I have been just going by time and touch.  Great points and I will get a digital thermometer ASAP!

  • lousubcaplousubcap Posts: 16,773
    edited March 2017
    Cook time at temperature is just a guide for when to start checking for the finish-line temp or feel depending on the protein of choice.  For a low&slow cook, you can even get by with an elcheapo analog (leave in the protein/oven) thermo you can find in any grocery store.  Just as long as you can check and adjust the calibration.  
    Nailing a hot and fast cook with a narrow margin for error (steaks and chops) does lend itself to a quick read thermo.  Different situation-different tools.  FWIW-
    Edit:  BTW- @Mattman3969 is the resident pulled chix eggspert around here.  
    And welcome aboard and enjoy the journey.  Above all, have fun.
    Louisville;  L & S BGEs, PBC, Lang 36; Burnin' wood in the neighbourhood. # 38 for the win.  Life is too short for light/lite beer.  
  • Thanks guys  This is great feedback  I am going to buy a dig themo today.  I really appreciate the time to give me this advice     Very valuable!
  • Rte1985Rte1985 Posts: 304
    I do a lot of low n slow spatched chickens but I cook them at 250° or so raise about 4" above the felt and it takes anywhere from 4-5hrs depending on the bird.  The water in the pan is not necessary in an Egg and only retards cooking(more like steaming).  I'm doubting you chicken are done but could be wrong.   What was the temp of the bird when you pulled from the egg?  

    I agree.  I'm usually 250-275 for a bird for a longer cook.  325-350 for a quicker whole bird cook.  But I usually spatch them anymore with an occasional beer butt here and there
  • The temp of the meat is important, smoking chicken cause the meat under the skin to turn pink. Also the younger chickens have a thinner bone structure and the blood in the bones will come out and  color the meat.
    So pink in chicken does mean the chicken is uncooked nor does it mean it is cooked.
    Billy
    Wilson, NC
    Large BGE - WiFi Stoker - Thermapen - 250 Cookbooks

  • I really appreciate all of the feedback    This is very helpful and I will implement this ASAP    Starting with a thermometer!
  • fishlessmanfishlessman Posts: 23,014
    200 dome temp is way too low and get rid of the water all together, its just slowing the cook way down. with your setup, temp, and altitude it might not be done in ten hours
  • Go by the internal temp of the chicken to know when it is done. 165 for white meat, 175 for dark. 200 dome temp is very low, try at least 300, 350 is better.
  • Thank you for that.  I'll remove the water as well as these temps are very helpful    I did not know about these as well as the dome temp   Super Helpful   Also, just as a side note, I did have to calibrate the dome thermometer for altitude    Prior to calibrating, it was 20% off.   You can do it by putting the tip in boiling water and then making the adjustment    

  • fishlessmanfishlessman Posts: 23,014
    your water boils 10 or more degrees less than mine from the getgo so your handy capped right there.  the water will keep the bird at a lower temp than the dome reading which is slowing your cook down. indirect setups have a hotter dome than where the food cooks, another handycap in the egg. 
  • buzd504buzd504 Posts: 2,540
    You don't need to soak your wood either.  Then you are just steaming off the water before they start smoking.
    NOLA
  • Both are super valuable man!  Great intel.

  • calracefancalracefan Posts: 602
    Get yourself a Thermo pen instant read thermometer, expensive but well worth the cost.
    Ova B.
    Fulton MO
  • PoppasGrillPoppasGrill Posts: 210
    I have noticed when I was putting the chicken rack on the drip pan it wasn't cooking as evenly, so I started putting the drip pan on top of the conveggtor and then the rack on the grate above. Haven't had any issues since then with tender breasts and undercooked thighs.
  • 1voyager1voyager Posts: 305
    Thank you both   I am at altitude now, 6k ft, and I am not getting an accurate read on my manual thermometer so I have been just going by time and touch.  Great points and I will get a digital thermometer ASAP!

    I am at 6.7k feet. I do 325 degrees, direct using vertical roaster. No water. 4-5 pound bird takes about 1 hour and 15 minutes to 170 degrees.
    Somewhere in Colorado
    LBGE, PGS A40 Gasser
  • Does anyone brine a chicken prior to grilling it?  If so, do you potentially have a recipe for the brining process. Thank you 
  • RedSkipRedSkip Posts: 1,290
    1/4 C Salt
    1/4 C Brown Sugar
    4 C Water

    Brine for at least 4 hours ... hope this helps.  @rickybobby12
    Large BGE - McDonald, PA
  • lousubcaplousubcap Posts: 16,773
    @rickybobby12 - just make sure you do not have an already juiced bird.
    Louisville;  L & S BGEs, PBC, Lang 36; Burnin' wood in the neighbourhood. # 38 for the win.  Life is too short for light/lite beer.  
  • Hans61Hans61 Posts: 3,412
    Use a meat thermometer. Also, I like to "smoke roast" birds to get a crispy skin.
    “There are three rules that I live by: never get less than twelve hours sleep; never play cards with a guy who has the same first name as a city; and never get involved with a woman with a tattoo of a dagger on her body.”
    Coach Finstock Teen Wolf
  • Thank you both very much.   This really helps.  I'll keep you posted on the outcome. 
  • Mattman3969Mattman3969 Posts: 8,050
    Does anyone brine a chicken prior to grilling it?  If so, do you potentially have a recipe for the brining process. Thank you 
    Whole bird, no. Just chickens tweets than yes.  

    -----------------------------------------


    2008 -Large BGE. 2013- Small BGE and 2015 - Mini. Henderson, Ky.
  • 1) KEEP THAT LID CLOSED!!!

    I was in Colorado Springs for a few years so it was over 6k and struggled with that a little. But I found opening the lid on my smokers (didn't have an Egg yet) took much longer to get my done temp back than in Tennessee.

    2) No need to add extra wood. Chicken absorbs smoke easily. Just cause you can't see it doesn't mean it's not there.  

    3) Thermapen. It will change your life. 

    "Brought to you by bourbon, bacon, and a series of questionable life decisions."

    South of Nashville, TN


  • buzd504 said:
    You don't need to soak your wood either.  Then you are just steaming off the water before they start smoking.
    I was going to say this as well...but fear of an OT detour on this thread stopped me. But I don't soak mine. 

    "Brought to you by bourbon, bacon, and a series of questionable life decisions."

    South of Nashville, TN

  • WolfpackWolfpack Posts: 2,650
    Beautiful defender- 
    Greensboro, NC
  • 200 degrees is a low temp cook, especially at high altitude.  Up it to 250 at least (or even 300 - that's my standard BGE temp now.)  And get yourself a high quality instant read thermometer.  The Thermapen is expensive (it's on sale right now though - great deal at $59), but it's essential in my kitchen.

    Love cooking on my XL BGE for 2, 12, or 100!
    www.principalchef.com

  • Thank you all for the feedback   I increased the temp to 250, soaked in brown sugar, spices, and salt for 4 hours.  I turned out amazing.  If I dont soak the chips/chucks, they seem to flame up and burn off rather fast.  Is there a fix to this?  Should I buy larger chunks?  Also, Are you adding wood throuout the entire process or is it more effective at certain stages of the grilling like say in the beginning or the end?  Thank you
  • bikesAndBBQbikesAndBBQ Posts: 163
    I am not familiar with all setups as mine is just the stock egg set up, but I am not sure how you would easily add more wood chips/chunks at any stage other than around the time of lighting the fire.  I've never had a problem with my chunks burning too quickly and I do not soak.  Maybe try spreading through different layers of the charcoal and not having the chips/chunks by whatever you use to light the fire?
    Pittsburgh, PA. LBGE
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