Big Green Egg - EGGhead Forum - The Ultimate Cooking Experience...
Welcome to the EGGhead Forum - a great place to visit and packed with tips and EGGspert advice! You can also join the conversation and get more information and amazing kamado recipes by following Big Green Egg at:

Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Instagram  |  Pinterest  |  Youtube  |  Vimeo
Share your photos by tagging us and using the hashtag #EGGhead4Life.


In Atlanta? Come visit Big Green Egg headquarters, including our retail showroom, the History of the EGG Museum and Culinary Center!  3786 DeKalb Technology Parkway, Atlanta, GA 30340.

What countries produce the most delicious lamb?

Judy MayberryJudy Mayberry Posts: 1,991
edited November 2016 in Lamb
The Costco butcher told me the two countries that have the best-tasting lamb and now I can't remember which ones they were. The three that I know of are Australia, New Zealand, and the U.S.. The last lamb I bought was apparently the loser third one, because it sure tastes funny! I have to force myself to eat it.

Good lamb is fantastic. Where does the tastiest lamb come from? 
Judy in San Diego

Comments

  • I am biased because I grew up in South Africa, most of the lamb is raised and produced in the "Karoo" which is a semi arid terrain they feed off the scrub bushes which are mainly made up of herbs..This flavor permeates into the lamb. I have eaten lamb from Australia and New Zealand, and it just doesn't have the flavor.. I have not eaten lamb from any of the Mediterranean areas, which I have heard is fantastic... Once again this is probably a biased opinion, I was out in SA last month and one of the first things I had was lamb... Delicious !!!
    Greensboro North Carolina
    When in doubt Accelerate....
  • Sea2SkiSea2Ski Posts: 2,655
    Freshest is best!. But you already knew that. I have eaten  Australian lamb in Australia and New Zealand lamb in New Zealand. The New Zealand lamb that I had on the farm it was raised was indescribably delicious.  They have the perfect raising conditions. Climate never gets too cold for them, they have fresh green grass that grows  year round, and fresh spring water all over. They don't have to walk much to get the best of anything. The Australian lamb was fantastic as well but again they were both really fresh. The second best lamb I had, however was from Argentina, but I think the preperation was what made that one so good. 

    If lamb is on the menu I order it!
    --------------------------------------------------
    Burning lump in Downingtown, PA or diesel in Cape May, NJ.
    ....just look for the smoke!
    Large and MiniMax
    --------------------------------------------------
  • lousubcaplousubcap Posts: 16,778
    I have heard first-hand that the NZ and Aussie lamb producers export their best lamb primarily to the US.  I have never had poor quality anywhere so I can't evaluate the best.  As above, it's all great.
    Louisville;  L & S BGEs, PBC, Lang 36; Burnin' wood in the neighbourhood. # 38 for the win.  Life is too short for light/lite beer.  
  • JustineCaseyFeldownJustineCaseyFeldown Posts: 867
    edited November 2016
    Depends what you like and what the butcher likes. For example, the butcher at whole foods near me (he's 70 ish and an old school butcher, not a supermarket meat cutter) warns me away from grass fed beef because he doesn't like it. 

    With lamb, you'll hear a lot of people who complain that it is 'gamey', a word used for any meat that tastes slightly different than factory beef. Like it's a negative. 

    I think you'll find american and new zealand lamb mainly. I haven't seen other options around here. I have had people tell me they find the American to be "better" because it's less "gamey".  But TBH, people say the same for
    new zealand. 

    Shrug

    If you got this far...

    new zealand lamb is typically pastured and grass fed. This yields the characteristics flavor. 

    While americans in typical factory-farm fashion (cheaper and more suited to the fearful american palate) have introduced grain. This is the same reason beef is fairly uninteresting in flavor too. It's all about adding weight, fast growing fat, cheaply and without the flavors you get from
    grass fed animals

    Kerry Gold butter is from fairly popular here. People laud it for the far better flavor. Well, it's grass fed. Regular butter is from grain fed animals. Since butter is basically mostly beef fat, well, it's an interesting thing to me that folks like more complex flavor (and 'healthier') in butter from grass fed animals, but abhor the flavor in the meat itself. 

    Basically: you gotta try it an decide for yourself. American lamb is considered more mild, beef-like. New Zealand lamb is, well, more lamb-flavored


  • gdenbygdenby Posts: 5,944
    I've had relatively poor lamb from all three countries, tho New Zealand produced has been marginally better.

    There are several small producers near me, and everything they sell is better in both flavor and texture. As an example, I made a couple of blade steaks from a local farm w. a particular marinade. My wife and I loved them. Later in the week, I made them again from ones I got in the store shipped in from Australia. My wife didn't even recognize it as the same cut w. the same preparation.

    As an aside, lamb used to be extremely scarce when I was young. Only ever saw it in the market around Easter. It is more common now because there is an enzyme the lamb produces which is useful in drug tests. The meat is an afterthought. I bought a half lamb from a lady who grows them specifically for food. The flavor was better, the meat more tender, and the fat less "gamey." The price, as you might expect, was nearly twice what I would pay in the market.
  • gdenbygdenby Posts: 5,944

    Kerry Gold butter is from fairly popular here. People laud it for the far better flavor. Well, it's grass fed. Regular butter is from grain fed animals. Since butter is basically mostly beef fat, well, it's an interesting thing to me that folks like more complex flavor (and 'healthier') in butter from grass fed animals, but abhor the flavor in the meat itself.
    Not to hi-jack the thread, but you might like to do some searches on "butter viking," or "Patrik Johansson." Most interesting info on butter. What we buy now is about as much butter compared to old style as market bacon is to country bacon. Perhaps even a greater difference.

  • Steve76Steve76 Posts: 53
    I spent 6 years "Down Under", and ate a lot of lamb, prepared many different ways, often overcooked. I've found that the lamb racks from Sam's club, two to a package, eight bones total, to be as good as anything eaten in various Australian locations, including some fine restaurants. I do not care for them well done, as they become dry and tasteless, so I try to pull at 125-130 IT, crusty exterior, nice and pink interior, juicy and delicious. FWIW, I have tried a couple of racks from Cosco, and was disappointed.
    Lutz, FL (next to the swamp), LBGE, Pizza stone, Egg Handler, Maverick 733,  Flameboss 300, Thermapen, &  Webber Summit for odds and ends and short, or "honey do", cooks!  
Sign In or Register to comment.
Click here for Forum Use Guidelines.