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Sausage question

Ok, I got the kitchenAid grinder/sausage maker attachment for my mixer. Tried making Italian sausage for the first time using a pork roast I got on sale. While they looked great, after tasting they came out a little dry. I cooked them on the egg and monitored the temps with my thermapen. Pulled them at 170 degrees. Any ideas?

Comments

  • NPHuskerFLNPHuskerFL Posts: 17,629
    Some add fatback to their sausage. Question...what KA model do you have? I have an Artisan and have thought of getting this attachment. Do you like it?
    LBGE 2013 & MM 2014
    Die Hard HUSKER & BRONCO FAN
    Flying Low & Slow in "Da Burg" FL
  • Needs more fat. A great sausage will squirt grease all over when pricked. When I cook mine I start them on the grate. Have a pan with onion, peppers butter and oil on the grill. When sausage start to brown, I throw them in the pan to finish.
  • @NPHuskerFL‌ I have the Artisan as well. Works great! Grinding is easy as well as stuffing the sausage. If you do get it I would recommend getting the extended tray attachment, as it holds a lot more product then the standard option.
  • So what kinda fat would you add? Is there a cut of meat that works best?
  • NPHuskerFLNPHuskerFL Posts: 17,629
    I would think just pork fatback. You can find it at just about any grocer. To be clear I've never made sausage but, fatback is often used in deer sausage for a binder because deer is so lean. Hope this helps. They look fantastic!
    LBGE 2013 & MM 2014
    Die Hard HUSKER & BRONCO FAN
    Flying Low & Slow in "Da Burg" FL
  • jtcBoyntonjtcBoynton Posts: 2,783
    Pork butt works great for sausage. It has the right ratio of fat to lean.
    Southeast Florida - LBGE
    In cooking, often we implement steps for which we have no explanations other than ‘that’s what everybody else does’ or ‘that’s what I have been told.’  Dare to think for yourself.
     
  • ZmokinZmokin Posts: 1,938
    I would think just pork fatback. You can find it at just about any grocer. To be clear I've never made sausage but, fatback is often used in deer sausage for a binder because deer is so lean. Hope this helps. They look fantastic!
    I've heard that backfat is the best fat for adding to sausage.  I know a butcher that periodically has it, but they won't sell it, they only trade it.  Take em a tin of homemade cookies or some other goodie to eat and they'll give you a couple of pounds of backfat.  Pretty cool.  I think there must be some law or stipulation in their contracts they can't profit off the unused portions of animals they butcher for their clients.
    Large BGE in a Sole' Gourmet Table
    Using the Black Cast Iron grill, Plate Setter,
     and a BBQ Guru temp controller.

    Medium BGE in custom modified off-road nest.
    Black Cast Iron grill, Plate Setter, and a Party-Q temp controller.

    Location: somewhere West of the Mason-Dixon Line
  • NPHuskerFLNPHuskerFL Posts: 17,629
    @Zmokin‌ I see fatback in Publix all the time. Maybe this varies region to region. That or the South just loves fatback. :x
    LBGE 2013 & MM 2014
    Die Hard HUSKER & BRONCO FAN
    Flying Low & Slow in "Da Burg" FL
  • BotchBotch Posts: 12,298
    klosurdo said:
    @NPHuskerFL‌ I have the Artisan as well. Works great! Grinding is easy as well as stuffing the sausage. If you do get it I would recommend getting the extended tray attachment, as it holds a lot more product then the standard option.
     
    Artisan here also; the grinder works great but I've had bad luck with the stuffer.  Bought a new 5# LEM stuffer but haven't tried it yet.  
    ____________________________________________
    "One idiot is one idiot.  Two idiots are two idiots.  10,000 idiots are a political party."   - Franz Kafka
            
  • What ratio of fatback to lean pork would you suggest?
  • theyolksonyoutheyolksonyou Posts: 18,077
    Is back fat and fatback the same? I think some fatback is saltcured. May not matter, but you'd have to watch the added salt.

    full disclosure: I've never made sausage, but my 5# galaxy showed up this week so imma do it real soon!
    Jason NW GA- home of carpet and Mexican restaurants
    LBGE, MM, BS (Blackstone and the other kind)
    One sorry Labrador

    My chili did not suck. My wings either. 
  • DMWDMW Posts: 13,827
    klosurdo said:
    What ratio of fatback to lean pork would you suggest?
    30% fat is what you are looking for. As mentioned above by @jtcBoynton butt works great, the ration is about perfect as is.
    Morgantown, PA

    XL BGE - S BGE - KJ Jr - HB Legacy - BS Pizza Oven - 30" Firepit - King Kooker Fryer -  PR72T - WSJ - BS 17" Griddle - XXL BGE - Akron Jr - BS SS36" Griddle
  • NPHuskerFLNPHuskerFL Posts: 17,629
    Ratio will vary according to what meat is being used. Ie venison, beef, pork etc. I believe charcuterie book gives a formula for these ratios. And here. http://lpoli.50webs.com/page0001.htmI
    LBGE 2013 & MM 2014
    Die Hard HUSKER & BRONCO FAN
    Flying Low & Slow in "Da Burg" FL
  • westernbbqwesternbbq Posts: 2,457

    yep, I make sausage 4x per year (90 lbs at a time) and bone in pork shoulder, untrimmed is what I always use.  What's interesting is that when it's cooked, it's still juicy but not overly fatty.  people have even commented on how lean the sausage I make is yet it's not lacking in flavor or juiciness. 

    BUt getting fatback can be tricky. if you run out of options, there are several places online where you can order it from .  I've never tried this but before discovering that the bone in pork shoulder with the fat cap already on it is perfect to for sausage, I did search for it online.


    one other thing-if you make shoulder for pulled port, I ALWAYS trim the fat off of it.  many bbq experts say no but in my experience, the trimmed pork shoulder has plenty of fat to keep meat moist.  plus, if you take that outer layer off, cleanup afterward is much easier.  I freeze the trimmed fat and add to beef sausage or to other leaner pork sausage for flavoring.

    attached is a pict of some Italian sausages I made (ground spiced and cased) and then cooked on the BGE.  nice color in the peppers up top too!

    just an FYI

  • ZmokinZmokin Posts: 1,938

    @Zmokin‌ I see fatback in Publix all the time. Maybe this varies region to region. That or the South just loves fatback. :x
    Let me clarify, I think the butcher I go to that butcher's animals for clients that bring them in may not be allowed to cut off unused portions and re-sell them to others for his personal profit.  A butcher shop that buys it's own 1/2 cow and pig to butcher is free to do as it pleases but if you are carving up someone else's pig for them, you can't keep parts for your own.  You are obligated to give everything back to the owner of the pig except that which is un-useble.  If the client doesn't want the fat, then it should be disposed of, not profited on.  I admit, I am only speculating on the reason, but if the butcher could legally sell it, then why wouldn't he.  They were quite adamant about the fact they wouldn't sell it to me, but they would trade it for cookies or candies.
    Large BGE in a Sole' Gourmet Table
    Using the Black Cast Iron grill, Plate Setter,
     and a BBQ Guru temp controller.

    Medium BGE in custom modified off-road nest.
    Black Cast Iron grill, Plate Setter, and a Party-Q temp controller.

    Location: somewhere West of the Mason-Dixon Line
  • canmancanman Posts: 52

    My experience with sausage is at least 80-20 ratio. Egg temp no higher than 174 deg, or the fat will melt out of it. Pull it at an internal temperature of 153-155 deg and right into an ice bath to stop the cooking process. Generally takes about an hour and a half for 5 lbs.

    I struggled with dry/crumbly texture until I read this in the Charcuterie book. Using this method, it comes out great every time. The hard part is to hold the egg at under 175 deg. I use the A-Maze-ing pellet tray for smoke and just a couple of charcoal chunks for heat. I have been looking for a more accurate way to hold temp but so far it is just watch it closely.

    Enjoy. There is nothing better than fresh smoked sausage.

    Tullahoma, Tennessee.
  • Sea2SkiSea2Ski Posts: 4,086

    yep, I make sausage 4x per year (90 lbs at a time) and bone in pork shoulder, untrimmed is what I always use.  What's interesting is that when it's cooked, it's still juicy but not overly fatty.  people have even commented on how lean the sausage I make is yet it's not lacking in flavor or juiciness. 


    This ^
    We do the same. Been making about 100 lbs/year, and we use the same. We may trim a little fat off the cap, but reserve it until we mix all the spices in case we want more.
    --------------------------------------------------
    Burning lump in Downingtown, PA or diesel in Cape May, NJ.
    ....just look for the smoke!
    Large and MiniMax
    --------------------------------------------------

    Caliking said:   Meat in bung is my favorite. 
  • westernbbqwesternbbq Posts: 2,457

    do you put the spices on the shoulder BEFORE grinding it or do you mix it in after it's ground.  I've read about advantages and disadvantages of each. I use a LEM #12 grinder and it can handle just about anything i throw at it without stopping, and a 5# piston-driven hand crank sausage stuffer (i should've gotten the 15# for another $150). I've not yet invested in a mixer and even with the quantities i make, I've had no problem with even spice distribution.  So far it's been Italian (red pepper flakes, fennel, salt and garlic), brats (allspice, cinnamon, white pepper, salt, marjoram and mace and caraway seed) and some French spring sausage  with a premade mix of herbes de provence. 

    I grind it up and then mix the spices in, but I've been tempted by the idea of covering the uncut shoulder with the spice mix and then running it through the grinder.

    i grind my own hamburger too but there's no spicing that up!

    Any ideas you have would be appreciated.



  • CookinbobCookinbob Posts: 1,690
    edited January 2015
    westernbbq said:

    do you put the spices on the shoulder BEFORE grinding it or do you mix it in after it's ground. 



    I have some recipes that say to add the spices before grinding, others that call for mixing into the ground meat, so I am not sure there is a difference. Liquids (wine, heavy cream, etc) are added after the grind, so that is how I have done it so far. (two times to date).

    Getting ready to do a batch of Andouille per Charcuterie real soon.

    Note, Ruhlman says sausage should be 30% fat, hence the need to add fatback (or back fat) to most recipes.
    XLBGE, Small BGE, Homebrew and Guitars
    Rochester, NY
  • fishlessmanfishlessman Posts: 28,619
    first, two high of an internal temp, second ust the butt, third, what may help is wrapping them in foil with some added water and cook till they plump up, then remove and grill. i like sausages simmered with a little water then finished in a hot pan more than grilled, grilled they seem more prone to prune up
    fukahwee maine

    you can lead a fish to water but you can not make him drink it
  • yep, I make sausage 4x per year (90 lbs at a time) and bone in pork shoulder, untrimmed is what I always use.

    ...

    attached is a pict of some Italian sausages I made (ground spiced and cased) and then cooked on the BGE.  nice color in the peppers up top too!

    just an FYI




    I also make my own wild pork and venison sausage. Pork back fat is excellent. Keep it COLD when you grind it. It should come off the grinding plate in nice well defined chunks and NOT smear or appear greasy. Place fat in the freezer for a bit to firm it up if need be. You can also cool your grinder parts in an ice bath or freezer too. 70% lean meat to 30% fat makes a good sausage in general. Trim and weigh separately to get an accurate measure. But as others have stated, a Boston butt was born with the perfect ratio, a gift from the Sausage Gods really.

    Off topic: westernbbq, please tell us more about your stone and grate setup.

    Thanks in advance!
    New Orleans, La.  - Large Big Green Egg
  • CookinbobCookinbob Posts: 1,690
    canman said:

    My experience with sausage is at least 80-20 ratio. Egg temp no higher than 174 deg, or the fat will melt out of it. Pull it at an internal temperature of 153-155 deg and right into an ice bath to stop the cooking process. Generally takes about an hour and a half for 5 lbs.


    Enjoy. There is nothing better than fresh smoked sausage.

    I have found when I smoke sausage, the casing gets really tough - I have to cut it up or peel the casing if putting in a sandwich.  It is never a problem when I hot grill it though.   Any suggestions on how to overcome this?
    XLBGE, Small BGE, Homebrew and Guitars
    Rochester, NY
  • All I know is that my wife says my sausage tastes great....
  • westernbbqwesternbbq Posts: 2,457
    Lindley said:

    yep, I make sausage 4x per year (90 lbs at a time) and bone in pork shoulder, untrimmed is what I always use.

    ...

    attached is a pict of some Italian sausages I made (ground spiced and cased) and then cooked on the BGE.  nice color in the peppers up top too!

    just an FYI




    I also make my own wild pork and venison sausage. Pork back fat is excellent. Keep it COLD when you grind it. It should come off the grinding plate in nice well defined chunks and NOT smear or appear greasy. Place fat in the freezer for a bit to firm it up if need be. You can also cool your grinder parts in an ice bath or freezer too. 70% lean meat to 30% fat makes a good sausage in general. Trim and weigh separately to get an accurate measure. But as others have stated, a Boston butt was born with the perfect ratio, a gift from the Sausage Gods really.

    Off topic: westernbbq, please tell us more about your stone and grate setup.

    Thanks in advance!



    no problem Lindley


    The platesetter had a hairline fracture in it about 6 mos after I got my first BGE- (an XL), I sent the photo in and they replaced it within a week.  I kept both but stopped using when I got the spider and stone setup for both the XL and L BGE's.  I was trying to come up with four levels so I could make 12 racks of ribs but to get the spacing, the adj rig would just rest on top of the ribs in the basement on the stock grate and sort of weigh down on them. So, I stood on the cracked platesetter, legs down and it gave way.  I stacked two pieces on top of one another in three locations and set the adj rig on top and BINGO, I had my clearance, Clarence, roger Roger, what's our vector Victor?   (Airplane!)

    I tend not to move the ribs around while cooking as I am not a purist but I did put up some foil as a heat shield.  All 12 racks came out perfect.  awesome results.


    Underneath the drip pan sits the XL Spider (inner ring down into firebox)  and the XL spider stone. 


    BBQ guru set at 210, beer in the drip pan and five or so hours later- BBQ rib perfection.

  • westernbbqwesternbbq Posts: 2,457
    Lindley said:

    yep, I make sausage 4x per year (90 lbs at a time) and bone in pork shoulder, untrimmed is what I always use.

    ...

    attached is a pict of some Italian sausages I made (ground spiced and cased) and then cooked on the BGE.  nice color in the peppers up top too!

    just an FYI




    I also make my own wild pork and venison sausage. Pork back fat is excellent. Keep it COLD when you grind it. It should come off the grinding plate in nice well defined chunks and NOT smear or appear greasy. Place fat in the freezer for a bit to firm it up if need be. You can also cool your grinder parts in an ice bath or freezer too. 70% lean meat to 30% fat makes a good sausage in general. Trim and weigh separately to get an accurate measure. But as others have stated, a Boston butt was born with the perfect ratio, a gift from the Sausage Gods really.

    Off topic: westernbbq, please tell us more about your stone and grate setup.

    Thanks in advance!



    no problem Lindley


    The platesetter had a hairline fracture in it about 6 mos after I got my first BGE- (an XL), I sent the photo in and they replaced it within a week.  I kept both but stopped using when I got the spider and stone setup for both the XL and L BGE's.  I was trying to come up with four levels so I could make 12 racks of ribs but to get the spacing, the adj rig would just rest on top of the ribs in the basement on the stock grate and sort of weigh down on them. So, I stood on the cracked platesetter, legs down and it gave way.  I stacked two pieces on top of one another in three locations and set the adj rig on top and BINGO, I had my clearance, Clarence, roger Roger, what's our vector Victor?   (Airplane!)

    I tend not to move the ribs around while cooking as I am not a purist but I did put up some foil as a heat shield.  All 12 racks came out perfect.  awesome results.


    Underneath the drip pan sits the XL Spider (inner ring down into firebox)  and the XL spider stone. 


    BBQ guru set at 210, beer in the drip pan and five or so hours later- BBQ rib perfection.

  • Saaaaaweeet!! Thanks for the details. Very creative way to fill your egg. Those ribs look mouthwatering! I'd like to try something similar with a pile of slow smoked sausage.

    Now... Back to the main topic. Thanks for the tangential info!
    New Orleans, La.  - Large Big Green Egg
  • Fat back and back fat. Just don't use Fooba fat. Never know what you might get
  • westernbbqwesternbbq Posts: 2,457
    Lindley said:

    Saaaaaweeet!! Thanks for the details. Very creative way to fill your egg. Those ribs look mouthwatering! I'd like to try something similar with a pile of slow smoked sausage.

    Now... Back to the main topic. Thanks for the tangential info!



    you know, you just gave me a great idea.  I can smoke a LOT of sausage at one time with this setup!  thanks for the lightbulb! 


    I was thinking a lot of chicken breasts, multiple spatch chix, four brisket flats, babybacks, spare ribs, or even a batch of smoked burgers which are sublime.  now i'll do the sausage!  stay tuned for future photographic evidence.

  • Ditto on more fat. Also try one cup nonfat dry milk to five pounds of sausage, just mix it in with your liquid. It will help retain moisture
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