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Smoking in windy weather.....

impag10impag10 Posts: 58
edited 7:41PM in EggHead Forum
Looking to smoke a pork butt this weekend....but of course in Rhode Island it is supposed to be rain and winds of 25-30 mph. What are people's experience with this, does the egg hold temp or am I about to frustrate the hell out of myself?

Comments

  • FiretruckFiretruck Posts: 2,678
    You might want to keep the temps around th 250-275 range. If you go too low it may do some crazy stuff. You probably won't have much trouble but try turning the egg so the bottom vent is away from the direct wind.
  • Do it. Since the vents need to be only slightly open to maintain 235-250 degrees, the wind shouldn't effect the egg at all.

    Faith
    Happily egging on my original large BGE since 1996... now the owner of 6 eggs. Call me crazy, everyone else does!
  • there's no real effect at all from wind, especially with the vents closed as much as they are.

    don't even bother turning the egg. if wind were an issue, it would suck it out the top before it pushed any air in.
  • RVHRVH Posts: 523
    In Oklahoma, when the winds are as slight as 25-35 mph, the kids play tee-ball and the eggers just open up the vents a little since there just ian't much breeze. We really hate it when it's like this, as the flying insects becoem pests on such still days. :P
  • RVHRVH Posts: 523
    Yeah, but given enough wind the Bernoulli effect can send a Mini up,up, and away..... :laugh:
  • BacchusBacchus Posts: 6,019
    Might be a PIA getting it lit. ;)
  • EggsakleyEggsakley Posts: 1,016
    Your right. A slight breeze doesn't seem to have much effect. Just business as usual in OK. Tornado's on the other hand will definately cause a temperature fluctuation and will require compensation, but 25mph is just about normal.
  • impag10impag10 Posts: 58
    sweet, looks like I am all set!
  • EggZactlyEggZactly Posts: 39
    Our only less-than-successful overnight low-n-slow smoke (Elder Ward method) happened on a cold, windy winter night when we were basically attempting an 18 or so hour cook of a Boston butt... the fire went out. That's never happened to us before, and never since. Once we realized what had happened we just re-lit the charcoal, brought it to temp, and resumed the cook, but it was sort of embarrassing since this happened when the folks were in town and we were trying to show off the capabilities and carefree cooking of the BGE...

    So, you're probably OK, but I'd either keep a closer eye on the grill temp than usual or cook at a very slightly higher temp than you would otherwise, to make sure your fire doesn't go out.
  • EggZactlyEggZactly Posts: 39
    Our only less-than-successful overnight low-n-slow smoke (Elder Ward method) happened on a cold, windy winter night when we were basically attempting an 18 or so hour cook of a Boston butt... the fire went out. That's never happened to us before, and never since. Once we realized what had happened we just re-lit the charcoal, brought it to temp, and resumed the cook, but it was sort of embarrassing since this happened when the folks were in town and we were trying to show off the capabilities and carefree cooking of the BGE...

    So, you're probably OK, but I'd either keep a closer eye on the grill temp than usual or cook at a very slightly higher temp than you would otherwise, to make sure your fire doesn't go out.
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