Big Green Egg - EGGhead Forum - The Ultimate Cooking Experience...
Welcome to the EGGhead Forum - a great place to visit and packed with tips and EGGspert advice! You can also join the conversation and get more information and amazing recipes by following Big Green Egg at:

Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Instagram  |  Pinterest  |  Youtube  |  Vimeo
Share your photos by tagging us and using the hashtag #EGGhead4Life.


In Atlanta? Come visit Big Green Egg headquarters, see our new showroom and check out the History of the EGG Museum and Culinary Center!  3786 DeKalb Technology Parkway, Atlanta, GA 30340.

Smoked Baby Salmon in BGE???

Peter CreaseyPeter Creasey Posts: 253
edited 12:13PM in EggHead Forum
Has anyone done a Smoked Baby Salmon in the BGE similar to this?...

4122942877_fff398be59.jpg

If so, details please? Time? Temperature? Etc.?

Comments

  • ClamClam Posts: 117
    I've been catching and eating salmon fort the last 25 years or so, and never seen one smoked like that! I suppose the smoke gets into the meat thru the body cavity. The tail section and upper back would have to be opened to get the brine and smoke into the meat? Penetrating thru the skin is probably very inefficient.
  • AlaskanCAlaskanC Posts: 1,346
    1 - that looks gross
    2 - you can't legally have a baby salmon

    I could help you out with cooking a whole (small) adult salmon if you want :)
  • reelgemreelgem Posts: 4,256
    I'm with you on that Melissa.
  • thirdeyethirdeye Posts: 7,428
    DSC01549ab.jpg

    Why on earth is it tied up? Was it hung in a cold smokehouse?

    I've done plenty of whole trout on planks, but if you are going to brine one for hot smoking, it's best to "hog dress" them. This means cut off the head and tail and set them on the grate with the cavity down, and spread apart. You can even put a couple of popsicle sticks inside to keep it open while smoking.

    DSC01551aC.jpg

    DSC01558a.jpg
    Happy Trails
    ~thirdeye~

    Barbecue is not rocket surgery
  • thirdeye wrote:
    Why on earth is it tied up?

    T, I assume the person did it so it would fit in her smoker.

    What temperature, time period, etc. do you use for your whole fish cooks?
  • thirdeyethirdeye Posts: 7,428
    If I was smoking it, I go with 225° to 250° pit temp and an internal of 130°, which should be just before it flakes. If you are keeping yours whole, try to get that cavity opened up a little. these are smaller fish, but you get the idea...

    smokedwholefish.jpg

    On a plank, I'm quite a bit hotter, like around 400° so I can get the plank to catch. This is a good plank cook.

    DSC04054a2.jpg

    This one got a little western. But it came out okay in the end.

    DSC07423a.jpg
    Happy Trails
    ~thirdeye~

    Barbecue is not rocket surgery
  • :blink: I didn't realize you were supposed to let the plank actually burn.

    Thought it was soaked so it would just impart steam and smoke :unsure:

    I've had a few that went "Westward" and pitched them. Some folks talk about reusing them....can you reuse the charred ones or do they impart a bitter taste (especially with soaking)?

    :woohoo: That pesto on the salmon looks tasty B)
  • Desert Oasis Woman wrote:
    :blink: I didn't realize you were supposed to let the plank actually burn.
    Thought it was soaked so it would just impart steam and smoke
    I've had a few that went "Westward" and pitched them. Some folks talk about reusing them....can you reuse the charred ones or do they impart a bitter taste (especially with soaking)?

    D, Yes, the plank can burn. I don't soak mine.

    Some folks say they use theirs twice but I only use mine once. The risk is if the plank burns through on the second cook all can be lost.
  • thirdeyethirdeye Posts: 7,428
    DSC05165b.jpg

    Well, you soak them to delay the charring, but idealy you want the food bathed in an envelope of smoke. Sometimes you can get more than one use out of them, but the problem is that lighter ones (alder and apple) curl from side to side and aren't flat anymore. Maple or hickory ones hold up better.

    Now if you're planking something delicate like brie, the cook is not that long and they can be used again.

    141fb5a9.jpg

    fd44046f-1.jpg
    Happy Trails
    ~thirdeye~

    Barbecue is not rocket surgery
  • dang those look good :woohoo:
  • thirdeye wrote:
    idealy you want the food bathed in an envelope of smoke.

    T, I see that you use parchment paper with your plank cooking.

    Doesn't this prevent or impede the plank from imparting some of the wood flavor to the item being cooked?
  • thirdeyethirdeye Posts: 7,428
    I use it sometimes, I wanted an easy removal wih that brie (notice the little handles I left on the parchment), and that particular salmon was skinless which has a tendencany to stick to the plank. I can't tell any difference in the flavor on salmon because normally I plank a skin-on fillet. Even when I skin it and remove the blood line, I put the skin back on before cooking.

    Here is some I did just last night.

    DSC09521a.jpg

    DSC09525a.jpg
    Happy Trails
    ~thirdeye~

    Barbecue is not rocket surgery
Sign In or Register to comment.
Click here for Forum Use Guidelines.