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Garlic in SV?

I'm planning on doing a boneless leg of lamb overnight in the SV. I thought I read somewhere that fresh garlic would become bitter. Should I use garlic powder instead? That would be a serious flavor downgrade though.

Thoughts?

#1 LBGE December 2012 • #2 SBGE February  2013 • #3 Mini May 2013
A happy BGE family in Houston, TX.
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Comments

  • I thought that garlic gets bitter at a higher temperature. I would assume that since you're doing it at a temp much lower than, say, 400*, so I think you should be fine. I'd go with the real stuff.
    Large BGE

    Neenah, WI
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  • SkiddymarkerSkiddymarker Posts: 7,070
    edited February 2014
    Cali - we do brussel sprouts with paper thin sliced garlic and bacon fat all the time, temp is 87ºC (about 187ºF?) never any bitter taste at all. The garlic is slightly browned in bacon fat and butter before the trés booblay bag is sealed, not sure if that makes a difference. 
    Delta B.C. - Vee-Gan: old Indian word for poor hunter. 
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  • gdenbygdenby Posts: 4,519
    My experience is that fresh garlic does produce an unpleasant flavor. I don't know if that is because I've used it in SV at a temperature to low to break down the allicin, or that there isn't enough air to neutralize some flavor. I haven't pre-browned like skiddymarker mentions.

    I have used a good quality of garlic granules, and enjoyed the result. Over-all, it seems to me that SV concentrates flavors, and one does not need to use nearly as much of anything.
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  • calikingcaliking Posts: 6,974
    Thanks for the tips, everyone.

    @Skiddymarker - Browning the garlic before going in the tub may be the key. I found a number of posts online about fresh garlic not tasting right after time in the tub.

    @gdenby - ended up going with granulated garlic. Used proportions for a roasted leg of lamb, so don't know if they will work for SV. We will see :)

    @Stoogie - I wish I could have used fresh garlic. Can't have enough garlic in a dish IMO.

    #1 LBGE December 2012 • #2 SBGE February  2013 • #3 Mini May 2013
    A happy BGE family in Houston, TX.
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  • I haven't had real good experience with fresh garlic. Not bitter as much as a really strong flavor. Try roasting it.

    Steve 

    Caledon, ON

     

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  • fresh garlic will turn bitter when it's overcooked. You have to be careful when frying it also as burning it will make it intensely bitter
    Gordon
    South Florida
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  • SkiddymarkerSkiddymarker Posts: 7,070
    edited February 2014
    fresh garlic will turn bitter when it's overcooked. You have to be careful when frying it also as burning it will make it intensely bitter
    Good point here - after frying up some bacon and removing it from the pan, I remove the pan from the heat, thin sliced garlic and small pat of butter goes in. It only takes about 30 seconds and the garlic is done. 

    I like the idea LS has, roast the garlic first then try in the SV. It would seem fresh garlic does not provide the best results in the trés booblay. 
    Delta B.C. - Vee-Gan: old Indian word for poor hunter. 
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  • calikingcaliking Posts: 6,974
    I'll roast a garlic head and keep it handy to try next time. Lamb mechoui is on the menu tonight.

    #1 LBGE December 2012 • #2 SBGE February  2013 • #3 Mini May 2013
    A happy BGE family in Houston, TX.
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  • I was just reading this...

    "An easy rule of thumb to remember regarding the potency of the flavor of garlic is: The smaller you cut it, the stronger the flavor. Chopping finely and/or pressing a clove exposes more surfaces to the air, causing a chemical reaction to produce that strong aroma and potent flavor."
    Gordon
    South Florida
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  • I've never really dealt with fresh garlic cloves, I've always gone this route...I have a jar of chopped and minced in my fridge... 1/2 a tsp = 1 clove of garlic.

    image
    Gordon
    South Florida
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  • buzd504buzd504 Posts: 1,224
    I've never really dealt with fresh garlic cloves, I've always gone this route...I have a jar of chopped and minced in my fridge... 1/2 a tsp = 1 clove of garlic.



    Nowhere near the same as fresh, IMO.
    NOLA
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  • I've never really dealt with fresh garlic cloves, I've always gone this route...I have a jar of chopped and minced in my fridge... 1/2 a tsp = 1 clove of garlic.image
    Bourdain strongly disagrees with this stuff:

    “Avoid at all costs that vile spew you see rotting in oil in screwtop jars. Too lazy to peel fresh? You don't deserve to eat garlic.” - Anthony Bourdain

    "America has only three cities: New York, San Francisco, and New Orleans. Everywhere else is Cleveland." -Tennessee Williams
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  • DredgerDredger Posts: 244
    I don't have a SV, but when using garlic in herb butters, I don't like the strong taste of raw garlic. Boil the whole cloves in water for 5 minutes, dry and mash with a chef's knife to make a paste. That "tames" the strong raw flavor.
    Large BGE
    Greenville, SC
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  • calikingcaliking Posts: 6,974
    Bourdain's a tool.

    I have used pre-cooked garlic in the past for Indian dishes and it worked well, but I prefer fresh garlic for dishes where garlic is expected to be a more prominent flavor. For Indian dishes, I now use garlic paste because it's easier to work with and the sauce of the curry has a better consistency.

    #1 LBGE December 2012 • #2 SBGE February  2013 • #3 Mini May 2013
    A happy BGE family in Houston, TX.
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  • caliking said:
    Bourdain's a tool.
    I agree. I like him and his shows but his sense of international foods is severely lacking.

    Steve 

    Caledon, ON

     

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  • calikingcaliking Posts: 6,974
    Bingo. I can elaborate about his lack of understanding if anyone cares, but I'm sure many know what I'm talking about.

    #1 LBGE December 2012 • #2 SBGE February  2013 • #3 Mini May 2013
    A happy BGE family in Houston, TX.
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  • Are you sous videing a whole lamb?

    Steve 

    Caledon, ON

     

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  • paqmanpaqman Posts: 1,656
    I think the problem with garlic is the risk of botulism...

    ____________________
    Entrepreneurs are simply those who understand that there is little difference between obstacle and opportunity and are able to turn both to their advantage. •Niccolo Machiavelli
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  • calikingcaliking Posts: 6,974
    No no! I only have a Demi to SV with.  Boneless leg from Costco. 

    #1 LBGE December 2012 • #2 SBGE February  2013 • #3 Mini May 2013
    A happy BGE family in Houston, TX.
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  • Did you put the spice, salt and garlic inside and re-tie?

    Steve 

    Caledon, ON

     

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  • calikingcaliking Posts: 6,974
    I thought about doing it that way,  and would have if I was cooking it on the egg.  But I was worried about how thick the tied up leg would be,  so I opened it up and laid it out flat with spice paste rubbed on both sides. 

    #1 LBGE December 2012 • #2 SBGE February  2013 • #3 Mini May 2013
    A happy BGE family in Houston, TX.
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  • That's sort of what I was asking. I don't know why the thickness limit is there...prolly the amount of time the middle of the meat is in the danger zone I guess eh?

    Steve 

    Caledon, ON

     

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  • calikingcaliking Posts: 6,974
    That's what I was worried about too. Douglas Baldwin has tables for time, temp and thickness of meat, but I don't recall seeing anything for the approximate thickness of a rolled up leg of lamb.

    #1 LBGE December 2012 • #2 SBGE February  2013 • #3 Mini May 2013
    A happy BGE family in Houston, TX.
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