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What's your ribeye method?

What's your method for steaks like this?  They're boneless ribeye, just over 1.5lbs each, about 1.75" thick.

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Last ones I cooked were more like 2lbs each, at least 2" thick.  I gave them what I thought was a pretty good coating of my BBQ rib rub and cooked them indirect at about 350F until about 125F IT (on the second level of the extender while doing the rib bones turbo below).  Wife complained the steaks were bland.
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Comments

  • For the thick cuts, ~2 inches, I do a reverse sear meaning raised direct at low grate temp (e.g. 275) until an internal temp of 105. Remove steaks to plate, tent with foil, fire up grill to 500-600. Then cook on lower level closer to coals for ~60 sec per side. Then let rest for ~10 minutes and internal temp should be ~135 or perfect medium rare for me.

    If you want a more involved, dressed up, flavor bomb then try the "Worcestershire Marinated and Glazed Ribeye Steak" recipe from the APL Serious Barbecue cookbook. I like my ribeyes straight up, but this is a really tasty recipe. Needs a big wine like a chewy Zinfandel, cabernet, or Mourvedre.
  • I meant to attach some photos. The first three are a reverse sear cowboy ribeye (~2 inches) and the last two are the APL recipe. The steaks are thinner. The ones on the rack are post marinade, and the steak on the board is pre-slicing in the board sauce.
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  • I don't mean to be an alarmist but, I noticed that the label on your steaks indicated that they had been blade tenderized. You may want to read this just to make sure that you're aware of what that entails.
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    Well, "spa-Peggy" is kind of like spaghetti. I'm not sure what Peggy does different, if anything. But it's the one dish she's kind of made her own.
    ____________________
    Aurora, Ontario, Canada
  • njlnjl Posts: 780
    edited October 2013
    Good catch.  I've never noticed that (in the fine print on the label).  So these were effectively jaccarded already either by Costco or whoever cuts their meat.  160F?!?  I don't think they'd be worth eating if I cook them that long.

    I guess in the future, I should look at buying ribeye roasts and cut my own steaks...assuming those haven't been all punched up.
  • Not sure who does it but, at least Costco labels the meat accordingly. I'll only buy Costco meat that has not been blade tenderized. I'll sometimes buy a whole tenderloin there and slice it for filets. It's actually less expensive (per filet) that way.

    I'd still go ahead and cook and eat those if I were you but I'd probably cook them closer to the recommended IT of 160*.
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    Well, "spa-Peggy" is kind of like spaghetti. I'm not sure what Peggy does different, if anything. But it's the one dish she's kind of made her own.
    ____________________
    Aurora, Ontario, Canada
  • Well, I definitely learned something today. Thanks Texan!
    Cherry Hill, NJ
  • DfishelDfishel Posts: 102
    1.25" thick @ 650-700F + 2min each side = med-rare
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  • ScottborasjrScottborasjr Posts: 1,984
    edited October 2013
    Very rarely do I get a roast and call it a steak, but a buddy of mine does it often. 2 to 2 and a half inch, sometimes 3 inch ribeyes. We do a modified reverse sear as we cook the steak and whatever the wives are having somewhere between 350*-400*. Pull the steak at about 110* for a rest while finishing the meal for the girls.  Then bump the egg up to 700*+ and sear for one minute per side then check with the thermapen. Sometimes the meat is ready after one turn, sometimes it takes 4-5.

    Everybody says that brisket is a difficult cook, but getting steak exactly the way you want it can be even more so. Trial and error is all I can recommend. And hopefully finding a butcher/ meat department that has a consistent quality of meat.
    I raise my kids, cook and golf.  When work gets in the way I'm pissed, I'm pissed off 48 weeks a year.
    Inbetween Iowa and Colorado, not close to anything remotely entertaining outside of football season. 
  • Thanks for the info, I'm a 130/ 135 let it rest kinda guy.
  • TerrebanditTerrebandit Posts: 1,051
    I like searing mine first at a very hot temp, usually 700+. Then I pull them and choke the egg down to 300 or 350. I put them back on and flip them every couple minutes until the temp is right. Check temp with a thermapen. I use kosher salt and pepper for seasoning before I start this process. Searing them first seals in the juices better, IMO. Also this method gives me better control of the internal temps. .
    Dave - Austin, TX
  • flynnbobflynnbob Posts: 567
    Glad I read this re the Blade Tenderized.  Good one, TOTN.  I do about 550 for 2 min each side and then roast at 350 until I hit 130 on the Termapen - It has been working great every time, been doing bone-ins.
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    Milton, GA.
  • SkiddymarkerSkiddymarker Posts: 6,059
    when the wife said bland, was it the smoke she missed or the crust/spice?
    If it is the smoke, do the roast at a lower temp, lets the meat take on the flavour of both smoke and spice/rub - try around 250-275º. 
    Rib rubs usually have some sugar in them, to me not the classic rib eye rub. Cracked black, salt and some garlic is good, or any commercial steak rub. 

    Before you drop the rested steaks on to sear, give them a dab with a paper towel to dry the surface if they are wet - this speeds the sear, improves the crust and helps to not overshoot the target temp. SWMBO likes a brush of butter on her very well done steak, adds flavour to the crust, not for me. 
    Delta B.C. - Vee-Gan: old Indian word for poor hunter. 
  • KoskoKosko Posts: 535
    edited October 2013
    Thanks for that info@TexanOfTheNorth ! I never knew that until now! I will always read the package when I buy steaks from now on!
    Peachtree City, Ga Large BGE
  • tjvtjv Posts: 3,273
    edited October 2013
    sear them to desired char, then season with rubs and such, finish to desired temp high in dome with a sliver (pinky finger size stick) of mesquite for smoke.  think pic is tri-tip, same processimage
    www.ceramicgrillstore.com
    ACGP, Inc.
  • I cook mine at 600 for two minutes on each side, flip it, and close all the vents for three minutes and finished. Very good medium. Here is a picture of a ribeye I cooked last week.image
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  • njlnjl Posts: 780
    when the wife said bland, was it the smoke she missed or the crust/spice?
    If it is the smoke, do the roast at a lower temp, lets the meat take on the flavour of both smoke and spice/rub - try around 250-275º. 
    Rib rubs usually have some sugar in them, to me not the classic rib eye rub. Cracked black, salt and some garlic is good, or any commercial steak rub. 

    Before you drop the rested steaks on to sear, give them a dab with a paper towel to dry the surface if they are wet - this speeds the sear, improves the crust and helps to not overshoot the target temp. SWMBO likes a brush of butter on her very well done steak, adds flavour to the crust, not for me. 
    It was just a general lack of flavor.  I've been tossing a couple of chunks of oak in with the lump for the past year or so (since I harvested some back yard oak), but I think the main problem was I was just too light with the rub.  Using the rib rub, it looks heavier than it really is.

    These Costco steaks, I went back to just kosher salt and fresh ground pepper, and went heavy with it.  I took them up to just over 135F, then seared them, then plated and covered with foil for 10 minutes.  I was happy with the result.  She didn't complain.  :)


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