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Ideas for Albacore Tuna?

So driving up from the refreshing vacation we just ended (5 days at the Oregon coast) we saw a sign for fresh whole albacore tuna. So we stopped at Jessie's in Ilwaco, Wa and picked up a whole tuna for $2.30 a pound. After the charge for the cut we ended up with about 8.5 lbs for $47, or roughly $6/lb for fresh wild tuna, score. Anyway, any ideas on how to cook a tuna steak?

Comments

  • just sear it im talking black and blue cold in center serve with wassabie and soy sauce and you will be fine you might want to sprinkel some black sesame seeds on it as well 
    2 Large Eggs and a Mini 2 Pit Bulls and a Pork shoulder or butt nearby and 100% SICILIAN
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  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 12,220
    I agree - just sear it...cooked tuna is horrible unless you make a salad or casserole with it.  Raw, it's delicious. 

    My favorite is tuna ceviche.  Takes minutes to make and it's ready to eat immediately.

    https://www.google.com/search?q=tuna+ceviche&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8&aq=t&rls=org.mozilla:en-US:official&client=firefox-a#q=tuna+ceviche+recipe&rls=org.mozilla:en-US:official
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  • CP92CP92 Posts: 186
    Can do it blacked as well and take it to Med.
    Chris
    LBGE
    Laurel, MD
  • Know why they flash freeze tuna? I've had it within 15 minutes of catch and have gotten sick as a dog. I've had it fresh and been fine too. They flash freeze it because of parasites...
  • Know why they flash freeze tuna? I've had it within 15 minutes of catch and have gotten sick as a dog. I've had it fresh and been fine too. They flash freeze it because of parasites...
    mmmmm. worms :)

    We always use frozen. The best sushi restaurants (in the US anyway) serve previously frozen fish. I don't know of anywhere that you can serve fresh but it's state by state so there may be a few.



  • I believe sushi is always previously frozen seafood. Don't make me google it

    Steve 

    Caledon, ON

     

  • I believe sushi is always previously frozen seafood. Don't make me google it
    I don't know of any that is not but there may be some out there. I know when we did it, we had to file a HAACP plan with the state that was over and above our health regulations. It stated that it must be frozen, for how long etc. We brought in fresh whole Tuna from hawaii and froze what were going to make sushi out of and sold the rest fresh over the counter.  I did eat a lot of the fresh stuff raw but I probably wouldn't again knowing what I now know.

  • I have always understood that is the case. Too many parasites in fish

    Steve 

    Caledon, ON

     

  • BotchBotch Posts: 2,734
    I believe sushi is always previously frozen seafood. Don't make me google it
    I did not know that.  So all the local advertising about it "being flown in that morning" is all BS?  
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  • @Botch, I always understood it was true of all sushi. I could be wrong but I am pretty sure. We can eat walleye, perch and whitefish right out of the water when ice fishing but I am pretty sure about this.

    Steve 

    Caledon, ON

     

  • In a quick look I found this.

    What is sushi grade fish and where do I buy it?

    The question of what is sushi grade fish comes up a lot and no one seems to accurately answer that question. After some research I am now able to provide information as to the guidelines and regulations that are followed in the seafood industry in terms of serving raw seafood. As for micro standards for sushi or sashimi grade seafood, I have spoken with many in the seafood industry who supply ‘sushi grade’ fish for sushi and sashimi served at restaurants and they all give me the same answer… they do not know of any regulations from either the FDA or any other agencies regarding ‘sushi grade’ seafood, which is why suppliers have set up their own micro and chemical parameters for their products. A personal search of FDA documents turns up the same results, no clear standards as to what makes fish ‘sushi grade’ or ‘sashimi grade’ and no definition of the term. The only concern any inspectors have is referred to as the parasite destruction guarantee, which is accomplished by ‘freezing and storing seafood at -4°F (-20°C) or below for 7 days (total time), or freezing at -31°F (-35°C) or below until solid and storing at -31°F (-35°C) or below for 15 hours, or freezing at -31°F (-35°C) or below until solid and storing at -4°F (-20°C) or below for 24 hours’ which is sufficient to kill parasites. The FDA’s Food Code recommends these freezing conditions to retailers who provide fish intended for raw consumption (for further information, please visit the FDA website). I know that is a mouthful, but it’s the facts.  Other than a few specific organisms of concern for some seafood, sashimi standards are set as any other ready-to-eat item, e.g. sushi. This means that, aside from the FDA recommendations and local Health Department requirements, there are no laws or recommendations for "sushi/sashimi grade" fish. It is no more than a marketing term.

    Steve 

    Caledon, ON

     

  • As the Mainers say - ahyup. And searing fresh tuna does NOT get the internal temps anywhere near parasite killing hot. Ya pays yer money and ya takes yer chances. If you sear fresh, non-frozen tuna you are rolling the dice with parasites. Probably won't kill ya, it from personal experience I can tell ya it is a crap shoot, so to speak.
  • CP92CP92 Posts: 186
    edited September 2013
    While there may be no "established" FDA process for grading tuna, there certainly is a market that demands it.  Tuna is graded by the buyers of the fish from the fisherman that catch it, based off their experience and sets the price based off market demand for that grade of fish at the time.  They use their experience in hopes that when the fish reaches the market it will bring the price the market has set for what they thought that fish was "graded" at.  We all know that not all prime beef is created equal.  But I'd say tuna grading probably comes closer fish for fish than the beef industry gets with its cows.

    What you cited was the "handling practices" to promote safe guidelines for serving raw fish and is what is recommended regardless of the "grade" of fish to be served. 

    Quick search turned this up.  Only did a summary glance, but think it's spot on

    http://www.soest.hawaii.edu/PFRP/soest_jimar_rpts/bartram_garrod_kaneko96.pdf
    Chris
    LBGE
    Laurel, MD
  • Botch said:
    I believe sushi is always previously frozen seafood. Don't make me google it
    I did not know that.  So all the local advertising about it "being flown in that morning" is all BS?  

    No. We flew it in fresh. Some of the best fish in the world. We sold some fresh but had to freeze anything that we intended for sushi.

  • In a quick look I found this.

    What is sushi grade fish and where do I buy it?

    The question of what is sushi grade fish comes up a lot and no one seems to accurately answer that question. After some research I am now able to provide information as to the guidelines and regulations that are followed in the seafood industry in terms of serving raw seafood. As for micro standards for sushi or sashimi grade seafood, I have spoken with many in the seafood industry who supply ‘sushi grade’ fish for sushi and sashimi served at restaurants and they all give me the same answer… they do not know of any regulations from either the FDA or any other agencies regarding ‘sushi grade’ seafood, which is why suppliers have set up their own micro and chemical parameters for their products. A personal search of FDA documents turns up the same results, no clear standards as to what makes fish ‘sushi grade’ or ‘sashimi grade’ and no definition of the term. The only concern any inspectors have is referred to as the parasite destruction guarantee, which is accomplished by ‘freezing and storing seafood at -4°F (-20°C) or below for 7 days (total time), or freezing at -31°F (-35°C) or below until solid and storing at -31°F (-35°C) or below for 15 hours, or freezing at -31°F (-35°C) or below until solid and storing at -4°F (-20°C) or below for 24 hours’ which is sufficient to kill parasites. The FDA’s Food Code recommends these freezing conditions to retailers who provide fish intended for raw consumption (for further information, please visit the FDA website). I know that is a mouthful, but it’s the facts.  Other than a few specific organisms of concern for some seafood, sashimi standards are set as any other ready-to-eat item, e.g. sushi. This means that, aside from the FDA recommendations and local Health Department requirements, there are no laws or recommendations for "sushi/sashimi grade" fish. It is no more than a marketing term.


    State and local standards are way more strict than FDA standards on raw (anything but especially) fish. We were in a small town in Wisconsin and the restrictions were nuts.

  • @ ct, interesting. We pan fried some 1\4 inch steaks tonight, girls ate very small bites of the fish raw. What is the risk if parasites are present? Should we freeze the balance of heat we have for a week then eat it?
  • @ ct, interesting. We pan fried some 1\4 inch steaks tonight, girls ate very small bites of the fish raw. What is the risk if parasites are present? Should we freeze the balance of heat we have for a week then eat it?

    I've eaten so much raw/unfrozen and never got sick but I wouldn't do it anymore. I pay $30 per lb for frozen bricks of "#1 sashimi grade ahi" now that I don't sell it commercially. I would freeze it if you don't think it has been.

  • The risk is fairly rare and the side effects aren't horrible. You are most likely fine.

  • @ ct, thanks. We will freeze it tonight
  • @ ct, thanks. We will freeze it tonight

    I would :)

  • NDGNDG Posts: 960
    Fresh Tuna on sale - I was going to grab some after work for a quick sear and serve raw in the middle.  I did a few searches here on the forum and now I am not so sure because they do not list it as previously frozen (they normally do for other seafood items).  Below is the ad . . . do you think this needs to sear and serve cold in the middle?


    USA WILD-CAUGHT
    FRESH, ALBACORE TUNA LOIN
    Valid
    3/26 - 4/1
    $8.99/ lb
    Regular $12.99 / lb
    Columbus, Ohio
  • fishlessmanfishlessman Posts: 16,235
    NDG said:
    Fresh Tuna on sale - I was going to grab some after work for a quick sear and serve raw in the middle.  I did a few searches here on the forum and now I am not so sure because they do not list it as previously frozen (they normally do for other seafood items).  Below is the ad . . . do you think this needs to sear and serve cold in the middle?


    USA WILD-CAUGHT
    FRESH, ALBACORE TUNA LOIN
    Valid
    3/26 - 4/1
    $8.99/ lb
    Regular $12.99 / lb
    if your in ohio, its a good bet that its been frozen
    :D
  • sumoconnellsumoconnell Posts: 882
    tldr; sushi is frozen.
    +++++++++++++++++++++++++++
    Austin, Texas.  I'm the guy holding a beer.
  • NDGNDG Posts: 960
    True, fresh tuna in ohio is NOT the norm. It is strange bc I get these ads daily and seafood is almost always listed as "previously frozen".  I called the whole foods, but the guy wasnt sure.  I guess I will ask again when I go to pick it up this afternoon.  I hope to sear and serve raw in the middle.  
    Columbus, Ohio
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