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Turbo vs. Low 'n' Slow

Here's the deal.  I am cooking a butt for a father's day cookout.  Serving time is noon Sunday.  I can either do a turbo or a long cook.  I have never done turbo before, so I'm a tad hesitant.  What differences can I expect if I go the more convenient route (turbo)?  I want serious bark, and I fear a turbo cook might not do that.
Austin, Texas
Vaya con Dios

Comments

  • TonyATonyA Posts: 542
    There have been some fantastic turbo butts posted here. For me, cooking anything is all about when I have time to put it on and go from there. Overnight butts go on when everyone is in bed so I tend to do that.
  • CANMAN1976CANMAN1976 Posts: 1,431
    This type of thread could get interesting real quick!!!
    Hows ya gettin' on, me ol cock



    Kippens.Newfoundland and Labrador. (Canada).
  • ddeggerddegger Posts: 244
    Others on here have more experience and you're likely to hear full endorsements of both methods. Before I cooked my last round I saw several folks say that the turbo method produced comparable results so I have it a shot and it worked great. Tons of bark, lots of good smokey flavor,  etc.  So, I'd say you've got nothing to lose by going convenient. Good luck! 
  • Hi54puttyHi54putty Posts: 1,382
    I am a turbo guy. Having said that, you will only get serious bark going low and slow. Not worth the extra time and effort to me.
  • EggcelsiorEggcelsior Posts: 8,719
    The only downside to turbo is slight reduction in bark from foiling. You will be the only one to notice, if you even do.
  • TEggSunTEggSun Posts: 212
    What can I expect timing-wise for an 8 pound butt done turbo?  I will cook to temp, obviously, but if I am serving at noon it would make more sense to start cooking the evening before versus starting a turbo at 6AM.

    Austin, Texas
    Vaya con Dios
  • ddeggerddegger Posts: 244
    I did two 6 pounders (not touching) in under 4 hours, so guessing around 5 hours for you?
  • TEggSunTEggSun Posts: 212
    Thanks, @ddegger.  Did you go 350 grate temp?  And did you pull at 195, or higher?  Finally, what was your FTC rest time?
    Austin, Texas
    Vaya con Dios
  • ddeggerddegger Posts: 244
    I started at ~300 dome and stayed there until IT of 160. Then foiled and let done temp climb to about 350. I pulled petty close to 200, about the time the bone was pulling out naturally. I went FTC for about two hours then sauced and ate. Truth is that it was even better the next day at lunch. 
  • TEggSunTEggSun Posts: 212
    Great point, @Eggcelsior.  I think I tend to split hairs on my cooks.  Folks seem to like what I'm doing, so perhaps I should relax a bit.
    Austin, Texas
    Vaya con Dios
  • BustersdadBustersdad Posts: 178

    Ditto turbo...don't forget to allow some time in the cooler.

  • shtgunal3shtgunal3 Posts: 1,997
    I did an 8lber today. On @11 dome 350. Pulled @200 @ 5:00

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     LBGE,SBGE Sweet home Alabama........ Stay thirsty my friends .

  • shtgunal3shtgunal3 Posts: 1,997
    I foiled @ 160 too.

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     LBGE,SBGE Sweet home Alabama........ Stay thirsty my friends .

  • Charlie tunaCharlie tuna Posts: 2,191
    ddegger said:
    "I started at ~300 dome and stayed there until IT of 160. Then foiled and let done temp climb to about 350. I pulled petty close to 200, about the time the bone was pulling out naturally. I went FTC for about two hours then sauced and ate. Truth is that it was even better the next day at lunch. "
     
    There are a few important reasons i go turbo on my butts.  But the first thing is to understand what turbo is!  When you start a turbo butt, your first step is to apply a maximum anount of smoke to the butt up until the butt reaches an INTERNAL temperature of 160 degrees.  The above method is NOT turbo cooking.  Starting cooking at 300 degrees does not "apply a maximum amount of smoke to the butt".  Turbo method starts at a very low temperature to s-l-o-w-l-y burn the smoke producing wood and expose the unsealed meat to the smoke produced by the wood.  Higher starting temperatures burns up the smoke producing wood and also seals the surfac of the meat early.  I start at the lowest temperature i can maintain, somewhere around 210 to 225 degrees.  This low temperature will give me, time wise, about three to three and a half hours before my butt reaches 160 degrees.  Using five to six pecan(what i use) chunks, i get about two and a half hours of heavy smoke.  
     
    The main reasons i turbo cook my butts is that it's finish time is shorter, but more importantly, it is MORE predictable.  Low and slow cooks, due to the "stall period", can vary two to three hours, one way or the other.  Include this with the additional cooking time and your average time can be 14 hours?  The turbo methed vary basically from seven to eight hours.
     
    The second advantage is the moisture that is saved within the foil during the second part of the cook.  This moisture is mixed back into the pulled pork, and remains there until it is consumed.  There is no adding sauces or coke to moisten the meat.
     
    The above request of a serving time at noon doesn't fit well with turbo finish times.  If i faced a serving time like this, i would turbo cook the butt a day or two earlier, keep it refrigerated in it's original foiled wrapping, and re-heat it the morning of the serving.
     
    Does the turbo cooked butt create bark - no, there will be a minimal amount, it is a trade off for moisture.  Bark is dry meat.  When i do pulled pork, it is served on rolls or served alongside a meal like "black beans and rice", so the bark is not missed. 
     
    Turbo cooking is a no stress method of producing a very moist product and being accurate on it's finish time.   My  $ .02       

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  • TEggSunTEggSun Posts: 212
    Thanks, @Charlie_tuna.  

    Has anyone ever done a low temp cook to 160, then foil wrapped and turbo-ed at 350 dome to 200 internal?
    Austin, Texas
    Vaya con Dios
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