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Pit Beef Questions

I think I've decided I'm going to try and tackle some pit beef for the game Sunday. Figured it would be a great way to break in my new meat slicer. I've been doing my research, reading old threads and stuff (not done yet) but figured I'd ask some questions of others who have done it in the past. I've figured I'd pull at 125ish, serve with a Tiger sauce on Kaiser (is that right?) rolls with raw onions.

1. I've read top round roast, bottom round and eye of round. Is there a preferred cut?

2. What works best - a reverse sear or just cook direct turning often?

3. If I do a reverse sear, should I use a drip pan and try to collect some drippings for an au jus? I don't think that is "standard', but au jus is always good.

4. Would it be best to cook it the day before, chill it and then use a meat slicer to cut it? And if so, do you reheat it? Or should I cook it Sunday, let it rest (for how long?) and then slice it?

5. Is there anything else you can think of that I am missing?

Thanks in advance.

Richardson, Texas

Griffin's Grub or you can find me on Facebook

The Supreme Potentate, Sovereign Commander and Sultan of Wings

 

Comments

  • I believe that Top or Bottom round is used for most Baltimore pit beef.  I have used these cuts for various roasts in the past and while they are flavorful a MR to M cook is a bit chewy for me.  I personally would prefer using top sirloin and find that as a roast this cut of meat is more tender but a little more expensive.  Roll the dice on the top sirloin. 

    If you wanted to try something similar then do some roast beef po boys instead.  Do the braising for the following recipe in the egg.  I made it a couple weeks ago and it was dang good.  I made some gravy from the braising liquid (after separating the fat) and dressed the sandwiches with some garlic/basil mayo and lettuce.  However the braising will not make the use of your slicer moot.  Also please don't take this suggestion as one where I am steering you away from pit beef.  Just sharing information on a prior cook.

    http://www.nolacuisine.com/2005/10/25/roast-beef-po-boy-debris-gravy/

     

     

  • GriffinGriffin Posts: 7,076
    That does sound good and I do love me some roast beef po' boys. That'll go on my to-do list for later.

    Richardson, Texas

    Griffin's Grub or you can find me on Facebook

    The Supreme Potentate, Sovereign Commander and Sultan of Wings

     

  • EggcelsiorEggcelsior Posts: 11,550
    Yes to using top rounds for this. The key is to slice it very thin. Serve on a kaiser or rye with horseradish and white or red onions. The horseradish should be enough to bring you to tears. It is grilled to rare, not smoked.

    Come to Bawlmer and we'll swing by Chap's off Pulaski highway.
  • GriffinGriffin Posts: 7,076
    @Eggcelsior - I just watched the episodes of DD&D and Man v. Food that went to Chips as "research". Looks outstanding. I think if we were having tons of people over, I'd try their "raven" combo. It had 3 meats, onions, cheese and bbq sauce. I think it was the beef, ham and corned beef...or was it pastrami?

    Richardson, Texas

    Griffin's Grub or you can find me on Facebook

    The Supreme Potentate, Sovereign Commander and Sultan of Wings

     

  • EggcelsiorEggcelsior Posts: 11,550
    Beef, Turkey, Corned Beef. Om Nom!
  • EggcelsiorEggcelsior Posts: 11,550
    Here is the video:



    Cook at 4 or 5 hunnert degrees, usually.
  • AleBrewerAleBrewer Posts: 555
    Sorry I can't offer any help on the beef....but what slicer did ya get??
  • TUTTLE871TUTTLE871 Posts: 1,316
    edited January 2013

    Few things you are missing.

    Alcohol<?xml:namespace prefix = o ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:office" />

    Cigar

    Big Screen TV

    Animal (For Relaxation)

    Slippers

    Lazzy Boy

     

    "Hold my beer and watch this S##T!"

    LARGE BGE DALLAS TX.

  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 15,440
    That guy at Chap's said he was throwing on a bottom round.  But they had all kinds of stuff on the grill. 

    Great idea.
    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.
    Large and Medium BGE, Kamado Joe Jr., smoker with a 5k btu AC, gas grill, fire pit, pack of angry cats, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.
    New Orleans, LA - we know how to eat 

  • TjcoleyTjcoley Posts: 3,422
    Here's one I did a while back with a reverse sear.  Turned out pretty good.

    __________________________________________
    It's not a science, it's an art. And it's flawed.
    - Camp Hill, PA
  • GriffinGriffin Posts: 7,076

    @TUTTLE871 - alcohol goes without saying. Plenty of bourbon and beer on ice. Big screen tv, 2 dogs and slippers covered. Don't smoke cigars, but do have a comfy chair ready if I can get the German Shepherd out of it and get it vacuumed down. :)) What are y'alls plans?

    And more importantly, do you know where I can get one of these?

     

    image

    Richardson, Texas

    Griffin's Grub or you can find me on Facebook

    The Supreme Potentate, Sovereign Commander and Sultan of Wings

     

  • GriffinGriffin Posts: 7,076
    @Tjcoley - yours was actually the first I came upon when searching.

    Richardson, Texas

    Griffin's Grub or you can find me on Facebook

    The Supreme Potentate, Sovereign Commander and Sultan of Wings

     

  • EggcelsiorEggcelsior Posts: 11,550
    That guy at Chap's said he was throwing on a bottom round.  But they had all kinds of stuff on the grill. 

    Great idea.
    Speaking of round bottoms, I forgot to mention that Chap's is a shack in the parking lot of a strip club. Dinner and a show, Bawlmer style, Hon!
  • FockerFocker Posts: 2,080
    Here is the video:



    Cook at 4 or 5 hunnert degrees, usually.
    Would a reverse sear with some smoke work also if going for med rare?  Man it sucks my slicer blade won't be done until Feb 6th.  This will be revisited. 
    Brandon
    Quad Cities

  • EggcelsiorEggcelsior Posts: 11,550
    If you want to it will. Traditional pit beef is grilled over high heat until it hits temp and then sliced paper thin. It's turned frequently while cooking. I think reverse searing would be more easy on the cook instead of standing over the egg with the dome raised.
  • jfm0830jfm0830 Posts: 968
    When I did my first Baltimore pit beef sandwich, I used a recipe from the 2011 Cook's illustrated Summer Grilling Guide. But I also went online research a lot of other recipes at that time. As far as the cut of meat Top Round, Bottom Round or Eye of the Round were all used. Top Round seemed to be the most popular choice, but I was not able to find it so I used Eye of the Round very successfully.

    2) The traditional method of making it is a high direct heat sear all away through. I find the size roast I cook typically takes about 45 minutes and I turn about every five minutes. In the end you are left with the roast that has a nice black cross on all sides and the two ends. I do sear the ends as well.

    3) This is a great make ahead meal so generally I actually cut it and store it in either plastic bags are food saver bags depending on how far as I am making it. I do save the juices and put it in the bag with the meat.

    4) I've generally made it ahead. I simply let the meat and the sauce come up to room temperature before serving.

    FYI Steven Raichlen has a recipe in BBQ USA for Baltimore pit beef. There is a specific horseradish sauce that made up with this it's kind of traditional. Here is a link to a version of SR's Recipe that appeared in the New York Times. His recipe is almost identical to what I made:


    Here are two blog entries I wrote about making Baltimore Pit Beef. You might want to give them a read. With the high temperature continuos sear, they meat carries over more that a normal roast and you need to allow for that.


    Here are the picture entries:

    Good luck! It is a great party food choice.
    Website: www.grillinsmokin.net
    3 LBGE & More Eggcessories than I care to think about.
  • EggcelsiorEggcelsior Posts: 11,550
    Nice article. I almost forgot that SR is from Pikesville.
  • Dang you guys got me wantin pit beef but that means I'd have to buy a slicer too.

    LBGE
    Go Dawgs! - Marietta, GA
  • GriffinGriffin Posts: 7,076

    @jfm0830 - I knew that Steven had a recipe in one of his books, but I was trying to do as much research as I could at work. I will look into that book today. I did stumble upon that article on the NY Times as well. Heck, I even looked up your post on it on Barbecue Bible because I knew you had done them before. Thanks for the links to your website. That will come in handy.

    I'm pretty sure that we are going to try this. Plans got a bit sidetracked yesterday with the mudbugs, but after calling a few places and finding out I had either missed placing an order by one day or that I would have to buy a whole bag (30-35lbs), that idea might be nixed. Got 2 more places to call today, but am starting to lean towards the pit beef.

    Richardson, Texas

    Griffin's Grub or you can find me on Facebook

    The Supreme Potentate, Sovereign Commander and Sultan of Wings

     

  • What temp do you keep the Egg at when grilling pit beef?
  • jfm0830jfm0830 Posts: 968
    edited February 2013
    @Griffin I like it because it is a great make ahead food and is about as good later as it is fresh off the grill. On the day you serve it you have to be just sober enough to remember to take the stuff out of the fridge and let it get to room temp before you serve it.

    @jimi1234 The recipes call for grilling on high. The consensus I have seen is high is between 45-650 degrees. I used 550 when I did it.
    Website: www.grillinsmokin.net
    3 LBGE & More Eggcessories than I care to think about.
  • fishlessmanfishlessman Posts: 17,502
    griffin, just make sure to cook it at high temps, under 300 gives it a different  texture(think deli roast beef). better cuts are more forgiving, over cook an eye round just a little and its tough, for superbowl, i might even go with a well trimmed ribeye roast
  • Dyal_SCDyal_SC Posts: 2,722
    I made it awhile back too. Here is the thread on the other forum:

    http://www.barbecuebible.com/board/viewtopic.php?p=216588

    Went with a Round Sirloin Roast. I did a sear at first, then threw in the platesetter and indirectly grilled it at 425. I went with Steven Raichlen's rub. Good stuff!
  • TjcoleyTjcoley Posts: 3,422
    Thanks for reminding me about this one @Griffin.  Saw a nice 3 pound CAB Sirloin Roast and decided that's what's for dinner.  450 indirect til IT of 90.  Seared right over the coals to 115 degrees.  While resting for 30 minutes, IT rose to 135 - not quite as rare as I wanted, but overall came out better than the first one.  Great sandwich.
    __________________________________________
    It's not a science, it's an art. And it's flawed.
    - Camp Hill, PA
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