Big Green Egg - EGGhead Forum - The Ultimate Cooking Experience...
We hope everyone enjoyed their Fourth of July weekend and is excited for more warm weather grilling! This week, we’ll be making these two burgers: Stuffed Portobello Mushroom and Caribbean Chicken, and also eating lots of these Ice Cream Sandwiches in honor of National Ice Cream Month! It's time to think about getting out to one of the many #EGGfests around the country - see a list here

Tough ribs

I did my first spare ribs a few weeks ago with 1/2 swamp venom and 1/2 brown sugar. Went for about five hours then pulled and put in foil and put in oven to keep warm because I had to leave for a bit, warmed back up in the oven when I got back. I am assuming this is why they were tougher than expected? Also, any ideas for a better rub? This one was a quick fix because I had to use the egg once I got it home but was too sweet. Thanks in advance for the help everyone, you all have been an amazing resource already. 
Middle Tennessee, large BGE. Go Big Orange!

Comments

  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 10,859
    Reheating shouldn't make 'em tough.  Probably they were under cooked.  (or, unlikely, if a jerky-like texture grossly overcooked).  Look up rib bend test and rib toothpick test.  Check your thermometer calibration if you haven't already.   I can't tell anything from the pics because the resolution is too low.
    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.
    Large and Medium BGE, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.
    No City.

  • Tough ribs are usually a sign of being undercooked like Nola said.
    What temp did you cook them at?
    That much brown sugar can burn and make you think the ribs are done, when they still require more time.

    Next time, when you think the ribs are getting close.....give them the bend test. Pick up the rack in the center with a pair of tongs. If the rack bends easily, and the meat starts to crack...then they are done. You can also probe the meat in-between the bones with a tooth pick. If the pick slides in and out easily...they are done.
  • Yeah I was afraid I may have undercooked them a bit as my fire went out at the last of the cook. The pics were unfortunately deleted and then found as sent text messages so they're not very good now. This was before I had my maverick as well so I'm not positive about the temp throughout the cook. Nola if you have any great authentic recipes from your area I would appreciate any advice, my wife is from Louisiana so I am always trying to find some ways to bring some home cooking back to her. 
    Middle Tennessee, large BGE. Go Big Orange!
  • You don't mention a temperature for the 5 hours?

    Steve 

    Caledon, ON

     

  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 10,859
    @vol_fan - sure - I'll dig up a couple favs.  I just built (well, a few month ago) this 8.5' tall bookshelf for all our cookbooks...this isn't even all of them.  Plus there are binders of recipes from the local paper, magazines and hand-me-downs. 

    cookbook case.jpg
    1200 x 1600 - 926K
    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.
    Large and Medium BGE, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.
    No City.

  • Sorry, that would help, it was fluctuating quite a bit as this was my first cook outside of burgers and chicken breasts. I was able to keep it around 260-300 dome for the most part, a couple of times it got up above 300 but I was able to bring it back down pretty quickly. So for the bend test, just grab in the middle and if it starts to crack then they should be done? I wasn't sure how much cracking it should be so I'm afraid now they may have been too done.
    Middle Tennessee, large BGE. Go Big Orange!
  • Set the EGG up for indirect cooking with the plate setter installed with the legs up. Place the cooking grid on top of the plate setter legs. Stabilize the temperature at 250°. You can add Hickory chunks or chips to the charcoal.
    Remove the membrane from the back of the ribs.
    Use about 1 tablespoon of rub on each side of the ribs (night before you cook is better)
    Cook the ribs bone side down for about 4 hours until they are tender. The ribs should flex and bend when you pick them up with a pair of tongs. The internal temperature of the meat should be 200° to 205°.
    You can let the ribs rest wrapped in foil
    Place the ribs back on the EGG and apply your BBQ sauce to the meat side of the ribs. Let the ribs stay on on the EGG until the sauce begins to stick, about 15 minutes.

    LBGE
    Go Dawgs! - Marietta, GA
  • @nolaegghead I would appreciate that very much, thank you. I have to do a better job of keeping up with my recipes when I am making new things and maybe I'll have a collection like that one day.
    Middle Tennessee, large BGE. Go Big Orange!
  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 10,859
    no prob.  The cookbook collection is Miss B's - I have a few - mostly stuff like cheese making, pickling, charcuterie, sausage making, etc.  Miss B loves cooking recipes, I'm more a research recipes then make up my own dish based on what we have on hand and what I like (only 5 cloves of garlic!?  Make that 15!).
    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.
    Large and Medium BGE, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.
    No City.

  • I think you "jerkyied" them. Foolproof for ribs, until you get the temp thing under control is the 3-2-1 method. Smoke for three hours, foil and some juice (braise) for two hours, out of the foil and BBQ sauce for 1 hour. 
    Temps for all is 250 target. This works every time. The ribs will not be the competition style dry rib, but they will be enjoyed. 

    For a rub, try Meatheads Memphis Dust, or the rub you used is fine.  
    Delta B.C. - Vee-Gan: old Indian word for poor hunter. 
Sign In or Register to comment.