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Brand new Large egg owner. Cooking troubles

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Comments

  • stikestike Posts: 15,597
    no need to get it roaring for a low and slow.  but if it works, have a ball.
    the VOCs from even a full load of fresh lump will be blown off during the hour or so it takes the whole system to get stable.

    it isn't necessary for lump to be burning for the VOCs to be burned off.  VOCs are fleeting, 'volatile' meaning that they evaporate, not that they are (necessarily) flammable.

    merely being in a hot environment, with a continuous draft, is enough to drive off the vast majority of VOCs




    ed egli avea del cul fatto trombetta -Dante
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  • EggdamEggdam Posts: 215
    So when your doing a low and slow you give yourself about an hour to light, stabilize and burn off VOC's? After this time any lump that begins to burn will not give off white smoke?
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  • stikestike Posts: 15,597
    pretty much

    open a fresh bag of lump and stick your nose down close and take a deep whiff.  that smell is the VOCs.

    dump it out, and smell it an hour later, and it'll be lessened.  without burning.

    i think the confusion comes from thinking the "volatile" part means that they have to burn.

    here, volatile means that they freely sublimate and become airborne.  like perfume.  the compunds which give perfume its smell are 'volatile'.

    sure, there're likely VOCs IN the lump, beyond the surface.  but the surface area of lump is much much greater than it's volume ( i know, can't really compare area to volume.... hahah).  what little is INSIDE the lump is inconsequential
    ed egli avea del cul fatto trombetta -Dante
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  • pretty much

    open a fresh bag of lump and stick your nose down close and take a deep whiff.  that smell is the VOCs.

    dump it out, and smell it an hour later, and it'll be lessened.  without burning.

    i think the confusion comes from thinking the "volatile" part means that they have to burn.

    here, volatile means that they freely sublimate and become airborne.  like perfume.  the compunds which give perfume its smell are 'volatile'.

    sure, there're likely VOCs IN the lump, beyond the surface.  but the surface area of lump is much much greater than it's volume ( i know, can't really compare area to volume.... hahah).  what little is INSIDE the lump is inconsequential
    There we go. That's what I was looking for. Great insight- Thanks

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  • 1 hour is a good estimate of the time needed to stabilize your egg for a long low & slow.  Remember there is a large thermal mass that has to reach 250 (egg + plate setter + drip pan) which takes time.  All the VOCs should be gone by the time the egg is stabilized. 
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  • ST1SSDVST1SSDV Posts: 25
    This has been working for me for 6 years with very consistent results..
    Royal Oak or BGE lump, one starter square.  I rake around any existing ash to drop it through the grate, add sufficient new lump, then use 3 large pieces of new lump to make a small cofferdam in the center and stand up the starter square in the cofferdam. 
    Open both vents all the way, light the square,  cover it with some more large pieces of lump.  Your fire should be ready to go and at about 600F in 15 minutes.  The paraffin in the starter will be gone.  If it's dark outside, the chimney will look like a jet exhaust. 
    Once it's going, put in your plate-setter and grid and burn off any booglies and throttle back to achieve your target temp.
    For consistent results, I rake out the ash every 4 or 5 cooks or every long cook.
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  • Had the same issue when I got my egg. I now wait a minimum of 1/2 hour before I put anything on. No issues since
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  • EggdamEggdam Posts: 215
    Thanks guys for the addition input should be good to go now.  However that damn platesetter was back ordered and should be in this week.
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  • yzziyzzi Posts: 1,793
    I remove the remaining piece of wax starters once my lump is lit and throw them in the ash bucket. They'll smoke for a while in there and smell bad. Tried the oil napkin method and will probably do that from now on. Food will have a different taste when cooked on charcoal and has a bit smokier flavor than when cooked with propane. Heck I love food cooked over a campfire.
    Dunedin, FL
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  • I remove the remaining piece of wax starters once my lump is lit and throw them in the ash bucket. They'll smoke for a while in there and smell bad. Tried the oil napkin method and will probably do that from now on. Food will have a different taste when cooked on charcoal and has a bit smokier flavor than when cooked with propane. Heck I love food cooked over a campfire.
    @yzzi- have you tried the zip fuel lighters? They burn way hotter and cleaner than the paraffin. They are alcohol based so no paraffin smell and the burn up with no remaining residue. I switched to them a year ago really like them. If you see them out there, give them a try. You won't have to dig anything out of your fires anymore. 

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  • gerhardkgerhardk Posts: 817
    @yzzi- have you tried the zip fuel lighters? They burn way hotter and cleaner than the paraffin. They are alcohol based so no paraffin smell and the burn up with no remaining residue. I switched to them a year ago really like them. If you see them out there, give them a try. You won't have to dig anything out of your fires anymore. 
    I think if you look on the package it states they contain kerosene, probably not the best flavour enhancer.

    Gerhard
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  • @yzzi- have you tried the zip fuel lighters? They burn way hotter and cleaner than the paraffin. They are alcohol based so no paraffin smell and the burn up with no remaining residue. I switched to them a year ago really like them. If you see them out there, give them a try. You won't have to dig anything out of your fires anymore. 


    I think if you look on the package it states they contain kerosene, probably not the best flavour enhancer.

    Gerhard
    I can't smell or taste anything. They burn really clean to me. Cleanest I've found anyway

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  • stikestike Posts: 15,597
    as long as they burn off, shouldn't be an issue.  mot like you are squirting it in there getting it everywhere.


    ed egli avea del cul fatto trombetta -Dante
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  • EggbertsdadEggbertsdad Posts: 794
    stike,

    Thanks for the explanation earlier. I appreciate the info.

    Cen-Tex, my wife picked me up 8 boxes of those on clearance from a store. They work great. 
    Sarasota, FL via Boynton Beach, FL, via Sarasota, FL, via Charleston, SC, via The Outer Banks, via God's Country (East TN on Ft. Loudon Lake)
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  • stike,

    Thanks for the explanation earlier. I appreciate the info.

    Cen-Tex, my wife picked me up 8 boxes of those on clearance from a store. They work great. 
    Then use 'em up! I never had any issues,  just make sure they burn all the way up. They do have a tendency to spew out some white smoke when they burn out or if you bury them and they choke out. That smoke stinks and would definitely affect food taste so make sure they are burned up and You'll be golden.   Also, for what it's worth, I never closed my dome until I was positive that they had burned out. I just didn't want that flavor at all in my dome. Probably overkill but just throwin' it out there. 

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