Big Green Egg - EGGhead Forum - The Ultimate Cooking Experience...
Welcome to the EGGhead Forum - a great place to visit and packed with tips and EGGspert advice! You can also join the conversation and get more information and amazing kamado recipes by following Big Green Egg at:

Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Instagram  |  Pinterest  |  Youtube  |  Vimeo
Share your photos by tagging us and using the hashtag #EGGhead4Life.


In Atlanta? Come visit Big Green Egg headquarters, including our retail showroom, the History of the EGG Museum and Culinary Center!  3786 DeKalb Technology Parkway, Atlanta, GA 30340.

Boneless Pork Loin Roast and Meat Net

TigerDunesTigerDunes Posts: 38
edited January 2012 in EggHead Forum
My butcher cut a pork loin for roast for me.

When I opened the butcher's brown paper, I found that it had a meat net surrounding the roast.

Should I remove or just leave it alone until after cooking?

Hope someone sees this thread as I am about to fire up BGE.

Thx

Comments

  • 4Runner4Runner Posts: 2,948
    I have mine tied but did it myself. I'm leaving mine on....not sure you need it unless you cut it open and then rolled it back together thought. That is why mine is tied.
    Joe - I'm a reformed gasser-holic aka 4Runner Columbia, SC Wonderful BGE Resource Site: http://www.nakedwhiz.com/ceramicfaq.htm and http://www.nibblemethis.com/  and http://playingwithfireandsmoke.blogspot.com/2006/02/recipes.html
    What am I drinking now?   Woodford....neat
  • joe@bgejoe@bge Posts: 394
    I would leave it...as 4runner said -  most likely its cut and the net is to hold it together so it cooks as one uniform cut of meat.

  • BakerManBakerMan Posts: 159
    I removed the net on the first one I cooked and it was a shapeless blob but still cooked OK and tasted great.  Now after I trim a pork shoulder I take some cotton string and bind it up so it cooks as one big piece of meat with no loose ends.  I cooked one two days ago where I took a 6 pound piece of shoulder and another odd shaped 2lb piece and wrapped them together to make one piece for cooking.  The net/string comes off very easy at the end of the cook.
    BakerMan - Purcellville, VA "When its smokin' its cookin', when its black its done"
  • Here is the lesson I learned.

    Trust your butcher!

    I removed part of the net and discovered this roast was really two small pork loins tied up back to back. No harm really done though and my BGE results were nothing short of superb.
Sign In or Register to comment.
Click here for Forum Use Guidelines.