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20lb standing rib roast...any advice?

shooteneq1shooteneq1 Posts: 9
edited November 2011 in EggHead Forum
So Fresh market had standing rib roasts for 5.99lb and i picked up a whole side thats 20lbs to make for christmas dinner. I have only ever made 1 rib roast and it was just 4lbs so i dont have any experience cooking one this large. i was thinking of cutting it in half and cooking them side by side with 2 diffrent rubs. Would this be ok or should i just cook the thing whole. Also what kind of a cook time should i expect with this thing. 

I also just used a regular montreal type rub on the last one i made and it was great. Anyone here with experience cooking these things have a better idea for doing diffrent rubs?

Comments

  • I hope you are going to dry age it til Christmas

    Steve 

    Caledon, ON

     

  • stikestike Posts: 15,597
    it will take no longer whole than it would cut in half, sinc e the heat is taking the short dimension to the middle.  like a hot dog twenty feet long, it would take no longer to cook than one regular length

    like steven said, right now is the perfect time to start dry aging that puppy.  rinse, pat dry, place on a rack (like a cooling rack) over a cookie sheet (you'll have minimal dripping), place it ideally in a spare fridge, or at the bottom rear of your everyday fridge (coldest spot).  as long as you are under 40 degrees (and your fridge had better be anyway), you'll be fine.  in a month's time you will have the  finest dry aged rib eye you can imagine.  a 400 dollar hunk, at retail anyway
    ed egli avea del cul fatto trombetta -Dante
  • I am not sure how to dry age to be honest. The only one i ever made i literally had in the freezer for 7 months and then just thawed and cooked and it was better than anything ive ever had in a restaurant. Any tips or links to a place that gives detailed instructions? ide hate to screw it up and make a 20lb slab go rancid lol.
  • stikestike Posts: 15,597
    edited November 2011
    ...um, just gave you the steps to dry age (above).  that is ALL there is to it. lots of folks will throw stuff at you trying to say it is difficult...  nothing more than 'unwrap,rinse,refrigerate'
    ed egli avea del cul fatto trombetta -Dante
  • bigdtdbigdtd Posts: 32
    lower temp for longer time, say 300 until center is 135-140ish i am thinking 3-4 hoursish
  • lower temp for longer time, say 300 until center is 135-140ish i am thinking 3-4 hoursish
    That would be a little more than medium
    :((

    Steve 

    Caledon, ON

     

  • If you have the time, very low temp until about 115 degrees, then crank it up to crust. Alton Brown's technique gives more detail and actually somewhat resembles an egg (he uses an upside down clay pot over the roast in an oven) so that should work as well in an egg. I have made a lot of standing rib roasts and I have found the low and slow then high to be superior. In terms of rub, hands down the English prime rib rub from Penzy's (available on line or if you have one near you, wich I don't, in their stores) is the best on standing rib roast.

    I agree with the others on some basic dry aging being beneficial if you have the space/time, as TFM's beef is not usually aged enough.. You will lose some mass, but given the size of that bad boy, it does not matter. 

    Enjoy!

  • stikestike Posts: 15,597
    true about losing mass, but the only mass you lose is water. and since water is flavorless, each forkful has more flavor than the steak which is not aged
    ed egli avea del cul fatto trombetta -Dante
  • I have all the time in the world so low and slow and aging isnt a problem. I guess my biggest concern would be since i have no experience in rib roasts if i go low and slow what kind of a time frame am i looking at. I got plenty of time to cook the thing I just want to make sure its done within a 30m time frame.

    And yea i live in florida and i use well water. There most certainly is a flavor to water. I dont care for it but all my veggies in the garden love it.
  • As stike said it will cook through the cross section, not through the length. I have been doing rib roasts at 250* or lower for a lot of years. you are probably looking at about 2 1/2 hours for the whole cook. If you use 250* it won't need a sear at the end. You have some flexibility cause it will sit for a long time after it's done and if it takes longer you can bump the temp at the end. The meat will look red but it will be cooked.

    Steve 

    Caledon, ON

     

  • This is great info. One of the few things that I have yet to cook on the grill. Gonna do it now! Heyyyyo
    thebearditspeaks.com. Go there. I write it.
  • I don't keep any records but I'll look back in my posts and see if I can find anything slightly more accurate

    Steve 

    Caledon, ON

     

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