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1st Prime Rib Attempt (with Pics)

So I finally got around to attempting a Prime Rib a couple weeks ago. All in all I was pretty happy with the results and it tasted great. Because of the people that were joining us for dinner, I had to cook it a little more well done than I would have like but that's ok. My set up was indirect at 230-240 and my rub was salt, pepper, lots of fresh garlic, and montreal steak seasoning. I pulled at 120 internal and then put in the oven for about 5-10 minutes at 550 degrees for the reverse sear. I made an Au Jus sauce to go with it along with asparagus and mac-n-cheese.  Any feedback (positive or negative) would certainly be appreciated.

Crunk

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Comments

  • rtt121rtt121 Posts: 645
    Looks great!
    Medium, and XL eggs in Galloway NJ.  Just outside of Atlantic City.  
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  • ChubbsChubbs Posts: 5,219
    Looks good from here
    Columbia, SC --- LBGE 2011 -- MINI BGE 2013
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  • MikeP624MikeP624 Posts: 292
    Looks good.  But why not sear it on the Egg.  While the meat rest you can get the egg up to 550 degrees
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  • Very nice, only way to screw this up is over cooking it !!  Looks great !!!  Congrats
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  • Looks good, reverse oven sear is good, but searing on the egg is even better, try it. Prime rib is hard to beat, good looking cook. I like your choices of seasoning. 
    Lately, I have taken the bones off and tied the roast to form a circle. The bones make the best au jus as you just don't get much in the way of drippings from a rib roast. 
    I put my CI grid on the fire ring, then two pieces of scrap ceramic tile (3/8"X1"X6") on the CI, then the setter legs up, a drip pan and the SS grid at the felt line. 
    The reason for the tile strips is to create a gap between the setter and the CI grid making it much easier to get the hot setter out later. 
    The meat comes out of the indirect cook as you describe, foil rests. I take out the SS grid, drip pan and setter and open the vents top and bottom. Within a minute or two the egg is at 500+ and the CI grid, which was already pretty hot, is now smoking hot. Sear the roast for colour and away you go! 
    Delta B.C. - Vee-Gan: old Indian word for poor hunter. 
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  • crunkcrunk Posts: 94

    Thanks for the input Skiddy....my main reason for the oven sear is because it was just easier and the fear of screwing it up using the egg. I could see it through the oven window and "babysit" it until it was ready to come out. Next time ill grow a pair and have the nerve to keep it on the egg for the sear. Thanks again!!

    Crunk

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  • crunk said:

    Thanks for the input Skiddy....my main reason for the oven sear is because it was just easier and the fear of screwing it up using the egg. I could see it through the oven window and "babysit" it until it was ready to come out. Next time ill grow a pair and have the nerve to keep it on the egg for the sear. Thanks again!!

    Crunk

    I've oven seared my share, know exactly how you feel. On the egg it can happen very quickly, maybe 2 minutes a side. In the oven, it usually takes longer and you run the risk of overcooking. 
    Delta B.C. - Vee-Gan: old Indian word for poor hunter. 
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  • Looks great. Gonna have to do another one of these soon now!
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  • Nothing wrong with the cook but something is amiss. The whole idea of doing meat at low temp is to have an even level of doneness through the entire cross-section. I wonder if your dome thermo is off and you read the temp in the middle of the meat but your temps were higher causing the outside of the roast to brown on the outside. I'm having trouble posting pics right now but I can show you a good example if I can get the pic up. Not at all being critical but you obviously have a valid question.

    Steve 

    Caledon, ON

     

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  • Have no idea what is happening with my photobucket. This is a PR cooked intentionally to 150 internal @ 200*(to prove a point  to stike) The bones were cut off at this point but the idea was to show the cross-section.

    DSC_0008-2 DSC_0008-2-1.jpg

    Steve 

    Caledon, ON

     

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  • AltonAlton Posts: 432
    Here is a picture of my Christmas cook. I reversed seared on the CI at 550 degrees for 2 1/2 min per side.
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    PROUD MEMBER OF THE WHO DAT NATION!!!!! Stuck in Dallas.......
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  • ChubbsChubbs Posts: 5,219
    Man I want a piece of each for breakfast and I will post whose tastes better. :D
    Columbia, SC --- LBGE 2011 -- MINI BGE 2013
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  • Looks perfect to me.  I remember having a lot of drippings when i did Prime Rib, had to be careful when opening my dome !!
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  • SmokeyPittSmokeyPitt Posts: 6,530
    Looks great!  Next time I think you need more garlic ;).


    Which came first the chicken or the egg?  I egged the chicken and then I ate his leg. 

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  • demodemo Posts: 145
    No such thing as too much garlic.
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  • EggcelsiorEggcelsior Posts: 11,290
    Or cowbell
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  • SoMdEggHeadSoMdEggHead Posts: 9
    edited February 2013
    That Rib Roast looks Sofa King Great man..  :D
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  • About how long to get an average size PR up to 120 internal when cooking at 240-250.
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  • There are too many "variables" to consider for me to give you a "guestament" ...   What was the temperature of the roast before you started, what level are you cooking it on, and like any roast meat, each is different and cooks different due to the fat content,etc...   Considering the cost of this meat, and how very critical the pulling temperature is, i would set up the cook where you never leave it unattended, and always know the internal temperature.  Everytime i do a prime rib i have a lot of drippings and fire flairs, which is fine, but it creates some high heat at times.  My own opinion is five degrees one way or the other can make of break this meal... 
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  • If I am eating at 6 PM am I starting the prime rib at 9 AM in the morning or more like one or two in the afternoon?
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  • crunkcrunk Posts: 94
    I think mine cooked for 2-3 hours if i remember right.....
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