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Smithey Cast Iron

BotchBotch Posts: 12,075

Saw this on Farcebook this evening:

...and I know there are some cast-iron fans here (all mine is enameled, and I have no financial ties to Smithey). FWIW.

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"LOL...  I'm not mad at you. You have to learn not to get caught"
        

Comments

  • DoubleEggerDoubleEgger Posts: 16,849

    I googled them. That’s a nice pan. Old school smooth finish. It seems a lot nicer than the Field I have.

  • bgebrentbgebrent Posts: 19,636

    Pretty piece.

    Sandy Springs & Dawsonville Ga
  • JeremiahJeremiah Posts: 6,412

    Been eyeing that one. They’re out of Charleston, my plan is next time we’re there, it’ll be a “spur of the moment” purchase...

    Slumming it in Aiken, SC. 
  • KiterToddKiterTodd Posts: 2,466

    What is the difference in manufacturing method to give them the smooth surface? I saw a video on it a while back but now I forget.

    The Lodge ones get the texture from the sand molds, I believe.

    LBGE/Maryland
  • BotchBotch Posts: 12,075

    I had tried quoting the video I saw on EweTube, which talked about the manu. method, but only the Sales site copied over (and the video on THAT site, in the left sidebar, was different). Sowwy! 😐️

    ____________________________________________
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  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 38,617
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  • njlnjl Posts: 1,123

    That'd be my guess. Probably more or less the same sand casting process, but then ground/polished smooth. You could do the same thing to a Lodge pan if you really wanted it to be smooth. These must either be cast thinner, or a lot of material is removed in the smoothing process. Their #10, which I think is equivalent size to my Lodge that gets the most use is about 2lbs lighter than the Lodge. Great looking stuff, but several times the price of comparable sized Lodge pans.

  • KKoterskiKKoterski Posts: 16

    I prefer Carbon steel. Actually found out about them on this site. I've never had good luck with seasoning and maintaining cast iron. For whatever reason, I could never get a good seasoning on it and everything would stick like crazy. I know I was probably doing something wrong, but bottom line, I could never manage to get a good seasoning.

    Carbon steel, I seasoned it, cooked some bacon and a few other fatty foods, and now it slides eggs around like air hockey. Plus it's lighter and gives an incredible, crunchy, brown sear. Ever mess up the seasoning? Sand it down and start fresh.


  • njlnjl Posts: 1,123

    If foods (like fried eggs) are sticking to cast iron, it probably means you either didn't let it heat up enough before putting them in, or let it get too hot. Like carbon steel, if the seasoning on your cast iron gets screwed up, you can strip it (easy off oven cleaner will do it) and start fresh. I did that a while back with my Lodge 10" and have been taking better care of it since.

    I am curious to try some carbon steel though. The bigger cast iron pans can be a pain to clean because of their weight.

  • I use a rotation of about four cast iron pans and four carbon steel ones. Love both materials equally - they behave differently and both have their rightful place in the kitchen. Haven’t used any other pans in years and years.

    While definitely lighter than cast iron, carbon steel still has some mighty heft.

  • acolleacolle Posts: 124

    Same. I recently added a 2 de Buyer carbon steel pans to my mix of 6 cast irons. I love my cast iron. Figured I would never cook on anything but. Then I used a quality carbon pan at a friends. Loved it. Performed as good as the cast iron. Possibly better in a few cases.

    Moved from upper left to Denver, CO | BGE LG & MMX + Kotaigrill [Hibachi]
  • KelsoKelso Posts: 74
    I have both the small and large Smithey cast iron skillets, and just bought their larger of the two chef skillet.  They are heirloom pieces that I thought I'd buy and use until I got old and then pass them down to my children or grandchildren.  

    I have a 1920's era large logo Griswold, a Wagner, and several well seasoned Lodges.  The Wagner isn't used much as it has a slight warp, the Griswold is a favorite but has taken a backseat since the Smitheys arrived since I want to build their seasoning. The Lodges are getting relocated to our lake house for duty there.

    The smooth surface of the Smitheys makes building seasoning a challenge.  The cooking surface is so slick that the initial oven seasonings you do will likely flake off.  I relegated myself to just building the seasoning up like a great grandma would...by using them often.  Now, after nearly 2 years the two cast iron skillets have great seasoning, I can cook eggs any way I want in them and 
    just use a paper towel to wipe them out afterwards.  The chef skillet is only a few weeks old so I'm now using it a lot to build its character.

    Anyway, the Smitheys are nice products, but they won't oven season like a rougher Lodge.  Even my Griswold and Wagner pans seasoned easier.

    I see the Smithey being the Griswold of my generation.  They'll be sought after one of these days.

    XL and a MM.  

    League City, Texas
  • FATC1TYFATC1TY Posts: 878
    Save your money.... they are great pieces, beautiful craftsmanship... but.... and there’s the but....

    they absolutely need to be babied to maintain their seasoning. Due to being so smooth the seasoning will tends to flake in areas, especially along the edge where literally every pan has an imperfection in it. 

    I’ve had their largest pan for a while now, I didn’t even pay retail for mine, and it’s still overpriced. We reach for our Wagner’s way more than the smithey.


    -FATC1TY
    Grillin' and Brewing in Atlanta
    LBGE
    MiniMax
  • HubHub Posts: 922
    KKoterski said:

    I prefer Carbon steel. Actually found out about them on this site. I've never had good luck with seasoning and maintaining cast iron. For whatever reason, I could never get a good seasoning on it and everything would stick like crazy. I know I was probably doing something wrong, but bottom line, I could never manage to get a good seasoning.

    Carbon steel, I seasoned it, cooked some bacon and a few other fatty foods, and now it slides eggs around like air hockey. Plus it's lighter and gives an incredible, crunchy, brown sear. Ever mess up the seasoning? Sand it down and start fresh.


    Do you suggest a particular manufacturer? Any idea who made the skillet in your photos?
    Beautiful and lovely Villa Rica, Georgia
  • Carolina QCarolina Q Posts: 14,829
    @Hub Matfer Bourgeat is a popular brand. Recommended by Cooks Illustrated (video out there somewhere with their comparison review). I believe that's what's in the pic above as most other brands have riveted handles. Matfer welds them on so the inside surface is smooth.


    I hate it when I go to the kitchen for food and all I find are ingredients!                                                                                                                                                                                                                           

    Michael 
    Central Connecticut 

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