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OT -- Any gardeners out there?

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Comments

  • theyolksonyoutheyolksonyou Posts: 16,722
    That's really cool. @HDmstng ;
    Jason NW GA- home of carpet and Mexican restaurants
    LBGE, MM, BS (Blackstone and the other kind)
    One sorry Labrador

    My chili did not suck. My wings either. 
  • ChubbsChubbs Posts: 6,925
    Raised beds are the way to go. Several benefits--- they soil is warmer so plants in ground earlier, higher up so easier to harvest, less weeds, ability to have perfect soil versus relying on native soil which has been depleted of nutrients, can install drip irrigation to water root zones versus spraying a plot and watering weeds too. The latter also wastes water. The list goes on and on. An example of soil-- my native soil has a pH of 5.2. This is pretty acidic. Great for blueberries, but not so much veggie patches. The ideal pH for home garden is 6-7.5 so I would need to amend a considerable amount annually for an in ground plot. Remember your garden is only as good as your soil. Follow all the rules with fertilizing, pruning, proper spacing, watering, etc and you can still fail if soil is not good. The key to a successful garden begins with the soil. Go raised bed and you can control extremely easily. Invest in the soil and the rest will fall into place.
    Columbia, SC --- LBGE 2011 -- MINI BGE 2013
  • tz666tz666 Posts: 374
    great restore

    image

  • MaskedMarvelMaskedMarvel Posts: 2,158
    Topping peppers - am I simply cutting the main stem above the third leaf?
    Large BGE and Medium BGE
    36" Blackstone - Greensboro!


  • ChubbsChubbs Posts: 6,925
    Topping peppers - am I simply cutting the main stem above the third leaf?
    Sending you a PM
    Columbia, SC --- LBGE 2011 -- MINI BGE 2013
  • tarheelmatttarheelmatt Posts: 9,427
    Picked up more plants today. Got okra, cherry tomatoes,  basil, and dill. 
    ------------------------------
    Thomasville, NC
    My YouTube Channel
    Facebook
    My Photography Site
  • LegumeLegume Posts: 8,587
    Chubbs said:
    Cedar mulch is a natural bug repellant. 
    Yes it is. It also pulls nitrogen from the garden though. Not sure which benefit outweighs the downfall. 
    I can fix that.
    Austin, TX
  • ChubbsChubbs Posts: 6,925
    Legume said:
    Chubbs said:
    Cedar mulch is a natural bug repellant. 
    Yes it is. It also pulls nitrogen from the garden though. Not sure which benefit outweighs the downfall. 
    I can fix that.
    Yep
    Columbia, SC --- LBGE 2011 -- MINI BGE 2013
  • ChubbsChubbs Posts: 6,925
    Picked up more plants today. Got okra, cherry tomatoes,  basil, and dill. 
    Nice! I did 4 okra plants last year and had 3 gallon freezer bags full after what we ate. If you have good soil they go crazy. Mine measured in at 14 feet last year which made harvesting a chore!! Might as well sow some loose leaf lettuce so you can enjoy a salad! Easiest thing to grow!
    Columbia, SC --- LBGE 2011 -- MINI BGE 2013
  • DoubleEggerDoubleEgger Posts: 12,915
    Mark your calendars for May 2nd. 
    http://www.wngd.org
  • LegumeLegume Posts: 8,587
    that's too funny @DoubleEgger I love how they have park clean-up and community gardening listed on there, yeah, please leave your backyard and venture out where there are kids and people with gardening tools, see how that works out.
    Austin, TX
  • theyolksonyoutheyolksonyou Posts: 16,722
    @doubleegger I'm not running the weed eater! 
    Jason NW GA- home of carpet and Mexican restaurants
    LBGE, MM, BS (Blackstone and the other kind)
    One sorry Labrador

    My chili did not suck. My wings either. 
  • DoubleEggerDoubleEgger Posts: 12,915

  • HDmstngHDmstng Posts: 192
    Drip irrigation...I recall seeing a post about it somewhere in the 9 pages, but was hoping to get a little help.

    Found these two systems, both are a bit big for my garden, but figured it was a good way to start.  Feedback or suggestions?

    https://www.grainger.com/search?nls=1&searchQuery=drip+irrigation

    https://www.dripdepot.com/product/478d490075eb512997a60000
  • LegumeLegume Posts: 8,587
    Putting together drip is like working with legos or tinker-toys.  you have a mess of different parts that do different things and the trick is to have the right amount of the right pieces to do what you want.  I would shy away from buying a kit and instead going to HD or Lowes and piecing together what you need from there.  You have to know what is available, how it fits together to get started, but then it's just simple planning for the area you have.

    I've been doing this for years, so I have one of those hardware carry things with a handle on top with lots of little plastic drawers for screws, nails, etc.  I keep my drip fittings in there, I keep a supply of several types of hose and I just cut and piece it together each year to adjust to what I have planted.  Heavier flow tips for water hungry plants, lower flow for those that don't tolerate much water.  When you're using drip, the time is the same for all plants, so you have to vary the flow at each plant to ensure they get the right amount of water. 

    It may sound complicated, but it's really not - you have a supply hose, you run smaller feeder hose off of that which terminate in a tip - some drip, some spray, some are adjustable flow, etc.  In my raised beds, it looks like a fishbone - the supply line down the middle and each feeder line coming off of that to each plant.
    Austin, TX
  • ChubbsChubbs Posts: 6,925
    HDmstng said:
    Drip irrigation...I recall seeing a post about it somewhere in the 9 pages, but was hoping to get a little help.

    Found these two systems, both are a bit big for my garden, but figured it was a good way to start.  Feedback or suggestions?

    https://www.grainger.com/search?nls=1&searchQuery=drip+irrigation

    https://www.dripdepot.com/product/478d490075eb512997a60000

    Please email me at [email protected] and I am happy to help. It is easy to do and I can tell you exactly what you need and the best online resource to get it from. 
    Columbia, SC --- LBGE 2011 -- MINI BGE 2013
  • ChubbsChubbs Posts: 6,925

    Legume said:
    Putting together drip is like working with legos or tinker-toys.  you have a mess of different parts that do different things and the trick is to have the right amount of the right pieces to do what you want.  I would shy away from buying a kit and instead going to HD or Lowes and piecing together what you need from there.  You have to know what is available, how it fits together to get started, but then it's just simple planning for the area you have.

    I've been doing this for years, so I have one of those hardware carry things with a handle on top with lots of little plastic drawers for screws, nails, etc.  I keep my drip fittings in there, I keep a supply of several types of hose and I just cut and piece it together each year to adjust to what I have planted.  Heavier flow tips for water hungry plants, lower flow for those that don't tolerate much water.  When you're using drip, the time is the same for all plants, so you have to vary the flow at each plant to ensure they get the right amount of water. 

    It may sound complicated, but it's really not - you have a supply hose, you run smaller feeder hose off of that which terminate in a tip - some drip, some spray, some are adjustable flow, etc.  In my raised beds, it looks like a fishbone - the supply line down the middle and each feeder line coming off of that to each plant.
    You can also install ball valves in each bed to control how much flow you want. See my previous comment if anyone has questions. 
    Columbia, SC --- LBGE 2011 -- MINI BGE 2013
  • DoubleEggerDoubleEgger Posts: 12,915
    HDmstng said:
    Drip irrigation...I recall seeing a post about it somewhere in the 9 pages, but was hoping to get a little help.

    Found these two systems, both are a bit big for my garden, but figured it was a good way to start.  Feedback or suggestions?

    https://www.grainger.com/search?nls=1&searchQuery=drip+irrigation

    https://www.dripdepot.com/product/478d490075eb512997a60000
    Home Depot sells a rainbird kit for 30 bucks. Worked well for me. 
  • theyolksonyoutheyolksonyou Posts: 16,722
    Rainbows also sells directly on their website. Sometimes some very good prices. 
    Jason NW GA- home of carpet and Mexican restaurants
    LBGE, MM, BS (Blackstone and the other kind)
    One sorry Labrador

    My chili did not suck. My wings either. 
  • LegumeLegume Posts: 8,587
    Yep @Chubbs each of my beds has a ball valve so I can shut it down if it's not planted yet or adjust flow.
    Austin, TX
  • theyolksonyoutheyolksonyou Posts: 16,722
    Ha!  Rainbows, rainbird stupid autocorrect
    Jason NW GA- home of carpet and Mexican restaurants
    LBGE, MM, BS (Blackstone and the other kind)
    One sorry Labrador

    My chili did not suck. My wings either. 
  • ChubbsChubbs Posts: 6,925
    Legume said:
    Yep @Chubbs each of my beds has a ball valve so I can shut it down if it's not planted yet or adjust flow.
    Www.sprinklerwarehouse.com is by far the best place to buy drip supplies. Most products are DIG and far superior to that at Home Depot or lowes and way cheaper. The poly tubing is much better, Ts and Elbows are not even in the same ballpark in terms of quality, and the emitters are much more uniform. Take a look and thank me later!
    Columbia, SC --- LBGE 2011 -- MINI BGE 2013
  • bboulierbboulier Posts: 557
    @chubbs ; Wish I could start tomatoes that early.  Home grown tomatoes are the first best reason for a garden.  Fresh peas are second.  Then comes lettuce, radishes, and a wide variety of beans.
    Weber Kettle, Weber Genesis Silver B, Medium Egg, KJ Classic (Black)
  • NDGNDG Posts: 1,587
    edited May 2015
    Picking up Tomato plants on the way home from work tonight.  Can someone suggest 2 or 3 kinds (romas, beefsteak, etc) of tomatoes ??

    We want to use them for: Sandwiches / Salads / Salsa.

    Internet search is overwhelming . . you guys always bail me out!
    Columbus, Ohio
  • tarheelmatttarheelmatt Posts: 9,427
    edited May 2015
    NDG said:
    Picking up Tomato plants on the way home from work tonight.  Can someone suggest 2 or 3 kinds (romas, beefsteak, etc) of tomatoes ??

    We want to use them for: Sandwiches / Salads / Salsa.

    Internet search is overwhelming . . you guys always bail me out!
    You may want to research OSU's website or the local Ag extension.  They'll let you know the best types of tomatoes for your area.  

    In our area, there is a master gardener that you can ask.  I bet it's the same where you are. 
    ------------------------------
    Thomasville, NC
    My YouTube Channel
    Facebook
    My Photography Site
  • tarheelmatttarheelmatt Posts: 9,427
    ------------------------------
    Thomasville, NC
    My YouTube Channel
    Facebook
    My Photography Site
  • MaskedMarvelMaskedMarvel Posts: 2,158
    There was an open plot in my community garden. I just got another one. Sweet. 

    Gonna do this one square foot style. Tack down some cheap oak trim with finishing nails. 
    Large BGE and Medium BGE
    36" Blackstone - Greensboro!


  • FiremanyzFiremanyz Posts: 903
    I had fresh kale from the garden tonight. It was great. 
  • ChubbsChubbs Posts: 6,925
    Firemanyz said:
    I had fresh kale from the garden tonight. It was great. 
    Nice. I make kale chips regularly. Chop them into "Doritos" and throw in bowl. Toss with barely enough EVOO to moisten, salt, pepper, and red
    pepper flakes. Baking sheet at 350 for 12 minutes. Plenty of variations and great treat 
    Columbia, SC --- LBGE 2011 -- MINI BGE 2013
  • NDGNDG Posts: 1,587
    My setup . . still a work in progress.  Raised bed for herbs & lettuce and side pot for tomatoes.  I have wood rods & velco for support, but not needed yet.

    QUESTION: think my pot of cherry tomatoes (sweet millions) will be too close together?  I read only one tomato plant per pot . . but I went ahead and planted all three of these together thining cherrys are smaller.  Also, all three came together in one pot from the store).  Appreciate all the help.





    Columbus, Ohio
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