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Can't remove rust from cast iron grid

My CI grid rusted over not long ago. I've been able to get a good amount off the surface, but the rust between the grooves will not budge. I've tried soap/water, baking powder, salt scrub, toothbrush etc. Any suggestions?
Southern California

Comments

  • FockerFocker Posts: 8,364
    edited March 2017
    A wire wheel brush or wire cup brush to fit your drill should take care of it.  
    Spray with PAM, and heat gently to reseason until blackened enough to use.  
    Brandon
    Quad Cities
    "If yer gonna denigrate, familiarity with the subject is helpful."

  • Carolina QCarolina Q Posts: 14,831
    Yeah, give up. It's a losing battle.

    I don't use mine much any more, but when I did, the only time I ever saw rust was when I really cranked up the heat for whatever reason. Then, all the crud from past cooks would burn off and I could see the rust. I never even tried to get rid of it. Just cooked and never cleaned it except what the heat from the next cook got rid of.

    Last time I looked, my grid was pitch black, but if I burned all the crud off again, I know there would be rust under the crud. I don't care. That's one of the reasons I never clean it.

    I would suggest that you slap some cooking oil on it, cook some stuff, and stop scrubbing the rust masking cooking crud off of it. =) I will guarantee there is rust under this.

    I hate it when I go to the kitchen for food and all I find are ingredients!                                                                                                                                                                                                                           

    Michael 
    Central Connecticut 

  • EggcelsiorEggcelsior Posts: 14,413
    edited March 2017
    Electrolysis will take care of rust if you have the tools to do it.
  • ColtsFanColtsFan Posts: 5,586
    Sandblasting will take care of it. Hit up your local machine shop 
    ~ John - https://www.instagram.com/hoosier_egger
    (2) XL BGE, LG BGE, KJ Jr, Ardore Pizza Oven, King Disc 
    Bloomington, IN - Hoo Hoo Hoo Hoosiers!

  • Carolina QCarolina Q Posts: 14,831
    Oh, you can get RID of it, but it'll be back shortly.

    I hate it when I go to the kitchen for food and all I find are ingredients!                                                                                                                                                                                                                           

    Michael 
    Central Connecticut 

  • I've always been wary of CI grates because of the rust. I think that they are a losing proposition because high heat simply strips the seasoning. I used to have a CI grate on a high heat side burner on my Napoleon gas grill. Within a year, the grate was so rusted it was unusable (despite extremely frequent seasoning!).
  • GregWGregW Posts: 2,532
    When I sold one of my eggs the other day I made sure the cast iron grid went with it.
    I don't think I have ever bought an egg accessory that served its intended purpose so poorly.
    Ideally, you would think a cast iron grid would be outstanding for searing, and in a way it is. It's a shame that the high sear temps also burn off the cast iron seasoning every time I cooked a steak.
    This caused my grid to be in a continuous state of rust.
    I'm glad the grid is gone, good riddance.  
    Birmingham, AL
  • LitLit Posts: 9,053
    The spiny drill things will take care of it. 
  • bicktravbicktrav Posts: 628
    Funny, I haven't had the CI grid that long, and this is the first time I've tried to de-rust it. It's been really good for high heat sears, but I kind of agree with many of the posts here--if rust is an inevitable part of owning it I think I'll just go back to the SS grid. 
    Southern California
  • Carolina QCarolina Q Posts: 14,831
    GregW said:
    When I sold one of my eggs the other day I made sure the cast iron grid went with it.
    I don't think I have ever bought an egg accessory that served its intended purpose so poorly.
    Ideally, you would think a cast iron grid would be outstanding for searing, and in a way it is. It's a shame that the high sear temps also burn off the cast iron seasoning every time I cooked a steak.
    This caused my grid to be in a continuous state of rust.
    I'm glad the grid is gone, good riddance.  
    For several yeas, I used mine for every cook. It was fine and the rust usually stayed hidden. I just got tired of lugging the heavy thing around. Also, searing is better on a CI skillet or griddle or a steel anyway.

    I actually have three CI grids. The first cracked soon after I bought it. It was still usable, but hey, it was brand new so they gave me a new one. It cracked too (also still usable) so I got a third. It has never been out of it's plastic bag. The others never cracked more, but I know as soon as I put the third one on the heat, the same thing will happen. I was tired of the warranty replacement game so I just quit.

    If I had it to do again, I wouldn't. What I should do is see if my dealer will trade me for a stock SS grid. I have the old porcelain one.

    I hate it when I go to the kitchen for food and all I find are ingredients!                                                                                                                                                                                                                           

    Michael 
    Central Connecticut 

  • FockerFocker Posts: 8,364
    edited March 2017
    Placing cast iron, in, or directly above, a raging fire is a recipe for rust, warping, cracking, etc.  

    The key to cast iron, is letting the iron heat up and assist.  
    Standard grid level is fine.  Raised direct, it shines.  


    Allow for a good preheat of the iron, and you're set.  
    Spray with PAM as the egg is cooling to prevent rust.

    I leave Raichlen's CI Tuscan grill parked in my Weber, Mangrates in my large.  Not one speck of rust, anywhere on the grids.  

    All cast iron requires maintenance.  In all honesty, I think most folks don't quite grasp these two concepts, and SS would be the better option. 
    Brandon
    Quad Cities
    "If yer gonna denigrate, familiarity with the subject is helpful."

  • My castiron grid stays in my egg. No rust that Ive ever seen. Probably would if I left it out. 

    Little Rock, AR

  • blastingblasting Posts: 6,262

    Electrolysis, or blasting would wok fine - whichever one you have access too.

    Wire brush works, but would be my third choice.





    Phoenix 
  • Elbow grease.  Don't let some domestic rust kick your manhood in the Southern regions.
  • MrWiganMrWigan Posts: 104
    My castiron grid stays in my egg. No rust that Ive ever seen. Probably would if I left it out. 
    Totally agree, I have the cast iron grid in both my Large and MiniMax.  I leave them in the eggs after a cook and I've never had a problem.

    I've put some rapeseed oil on them once maybe twice but other than I just scrub them down after use and they're absolutely fine.

    Large BGE, Mini Max

    Wigan, UK

  • MattBTIMattBTI Posts: 417
    Not long ago I found a large cast iron dutch oven outside. It was orange with surface rust, but no pitting. Heavy duty oven cleaner (with lye) sprayed across entire surface and placed in a trash bag for half a day or so worked well for the first step. The lye will break down any organic compounds on the cast. rinse well with water. Next submerge the cast in a 1/1 mix of water and vinegar. This will take care of the rust. Four hours in the vinegar solution with light scrubbing once or twice during the soak removed all of the rust. Working quickly, dry the cast and get some oil on it (light coats, one at a time). I used regular old vegetable oil. Bake the oil on. Repeat the oil and baking as necessary. 
    Pratt, KS
  • fishlessmanfishlessman Posts: 28,617
    wipe it gently with a paper towel with cooking oil to remove the rusty powder, then cook some steaks or burgers on it. red rusty lines will show up on white fish or skinless chicken breasts so avoid those if it bothers you ;)
    fukahwee maine

    you can lead a fish to water but you can not make him drink it
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