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Smoking with Walnut wood?

Anyone ever try it?  I am taking a walnut tree down in my yard and wondering if I should keep some wood.  I don't ever hear anyone talk about using it so I was curious. 

Comments

  • Used walnut when lived in CA Central Valley, very abundant and best part it was free for the taking.  Also used Peach, Apple, and Almond.  Make sure you season it some...too green can be a tad bitter.
    Eggin in SW "Keep it Weird" TX
  • busmaniabusmania Posts: 268
    By "season" do you mean letting it dry out a bit?  Id probably let it dry at least 3 months before using.  I live in colroado where it is very dry in terms of humidity so it should not take too long, right?
  • ZickZick Posts: 168
    It can definitely take you longer then three months.  More like 6-12.  I an in Co as well.  What part?
    When was the last time you did something for the first time? - Zick Boulder, CO
  • busmaniabusmania Posts: 268

    Thanks Zick.  I am in centennial now.  You? 

    Honestly I have no burning desire to try the walnut wood after doing some reading so it would probably be a year before I got to trying it out it anyway!  Id like to have the tree down in the next month but we have to decide if the tree is really coming down or not.  it looks pretty beet up from past snow falls and the previous owners of the house did not take any care in the trees or yard but it may be salvageable...but I don't love the tree so it may be better as firewood.  if it does come down, ill be sure to post on the forum in case people do want the wood, id give it away free.

  • GK59GK59 Posts: 466
    Get it slabbed up. A woodworker like myself would like to get my hands on some.

    Smitty's Kid's BBQ

    Bay City,MI

  • ZickZick Posts: 168
    Boulder.  

    When was the last time you did something for the first time? - Zick Boulder, CO
  • Some woods are not especially good for smoking anything, and some are better for smoking one kind of meat but not others.  I ran across this list a few years ago and found it helpful.  Perhaps you will too:

     

    Spring "None Smoking Former Smoker" Chicken

    Spring Texas USA

     

    Woods for smoking:

    Acacia is similar to mesquite but not as strong. This wood burns very hot and should be used in small amounts or for limited amounts of time.

    Alder has a light flavor that works well with fish and poultry. Indigenous to the northwestern United States, it is the traditional wood for smoking Salmon.

    Almond give a nutty, sweet flavor that is good with all meats. Almond is similar to Pecan.

    Apple is very mild in flavor and gives food a sweetness. This is good with poultry and pork. Apple will discolor chicken skin (turns in dark brown).

    Apricot is great for poultry and pork. This wood is similar to hickory but is sweeter and milder in flavor.

    Ash has a light, unique flavor. This wood burns fast.

    Black Walnut has a heavy flavor that should probably be mixed with other wood because of the bitter taste it can impart.

    Birch has a similar flavor to maple. This wood is good with pork and poultry.

    Cherry has a sweet, mild flavor that goes great with virtually everything. This is one of the most popular woods for smoking.

    Chokecherry has a bitter flavor and should only be used in small amounts for short period of times.

    Citrus woods like lemon or orange have a moderate smoke that gives a light fruity flavor that is more mild than apple or cherry.

    Cottonwood is very mild in flavor and should be used with stronger flavored woods. Avoid green wood.

    Crabapple is very similar to apple wood and can be used interchangeably.

    Fruit, like apple, apricot or cherry, fruit wood gives off a sweet, mild flavor that is good with poultry or ham.

    Grapefruit is a mild wood that produces a good, smoky flavor. A good wood for any meat.

    Grapevines make a lot of tart smoke and gives a fruity but sometimes heavy flavor. Use it sparingly with poultry or lamb.

    Hickory adds a strong flavor to meats, so be careful not to use to excessively. It’s good with beef and lamb.

    Lemon is a mild wood that produces a good, smoky flavor. A good wood for any meat.

    Lilac produces a good supply of mild, sweet smoke. A popular wood for smoked cheese, but also good for poultry and pork.

    Maple, like fruit wood gives a sweet flavor that is excellent with poultry and ham.

    Mesquite has been very popular of late and is good for grilling, but since it burns hot and fast, it's not recommended for long barbecues. Mesquite is probably the strongest flavored wood; hence its popularity with restaurant grills that cook meat for a very short time.

    Mulberry is sweet and very similar to apple.

    Nectarine is great for poultry and pork. This wood is similar to hickory but is sweeter and milder in flavor.

    Oak is strong but not overpowering and is a very good wood for beef or lamb. Oak is probably the most versatile of the hard woods.

    Orange is a mild wood that produces a good, smoky flavor. A good wood for any meat.

    Peach is great for poultry and pork. This wood is similar to hickory but is sweeter and milder in flavor.

    Pear is similar to apple and produces a sweet, mild flavor.

    Pecan burns cool and provides a delicate flavor. It’s a much subtler version of hickory.

    Plum is great for poultry and pork. This wood is similar to hickory but is sweeter and milder in flavor.

    Walnut has a heavy, smoky flavor and should be mixed with milder flavored woods.

    Other good woods include: avocado, bay, beech, butternut, carrotwood, chestnut, fig, guava, gum, hackberry, kiawe, madrone, manzita, olive, range, persimmon, pimento, and willow

    You can also find other wood products around made from wine and whiskey barrels that impart a very unique flavor. I have a fondness for Jack Daniel whiskey barrel wood.

    Woods to AVOID would include: cedar, cypress, elm, eucalyptus, pine, fir, redwood, sassafras, spruce, and sycamore.

  • henapplehenapple Posts: 11,782
    Thanks Spring Chicken. I only disagree with hickory not being listed as good on pork.
    Green egg, dead animal and alcohol. The "Boro".. TN 
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