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We hope everyone enjoyed their Fourth of July weekend and is excited for more warm weather grilling! This week, we’ll be making these two burgers: Stuffed Portobello Mushroom and Caribbean Chicken, and also eating lots of these Ice Cream Sandwiches in honor of National Ice Cream Month! It's time to think about getting out to one of the many #EGGfests around the country - see a list here

buying a egg this week

scooterq07scooterq07 Posts: 7
edited December 2011 in Root
first off i want to say hi and thanks to anyone who answears any of my ?  im going to go buy a new egg this week,what all do i need to go with it like a plate setter and so on???? what kind of tempeture gauge??? im new and dumb to this so all the help i can can i will take. 

Comments

  • I got mine last month. the XL BGE with the roller nest and folding sides and the plate setter and weather cover.
    LET'S EAT
  • Everyone here started as a newbie. I am still one myself. It comes with a grill dome temp gauge. Most people tend to by the large size egg. It all depends on how many you will be cooking for. Buy the plate setter if you are going to cook at low and slow cooks. Get a instant read thermometer at least. If you want to spend a little extra, get a maverick wireless if you want to closely monitor your cooks. Do not get discoraged if you can't maintain temp right away,everyone has a learning curve they have to go through. Stick with it and ask questions here,people are usually very helpful. In time you will be kicking out quality product your friends will envy! Enjoy.
  • DMurfDMurf Posts: 479
    The basics would be a platesetter or something to do indirect cooks with. If you are going to attempt low and slow a remote thermometer, an instant read thermometer (Thermapen is fantastic but not required), Lump, and something to grill. Remember to keep you first cooks on the lower side of the dial to break in the seal. 

    Calibrate your dome thermometer! Get a pot of water boiling, hard cook some eggs or pasta and dip the end of thermometer in the water, should come up to 212 degrees. If it is off take a wrench and adjust the dial by turning the nut. Wish I had done this sooner.

    Have fun with your purchase, there are a lot of accessories to take away your retirement fund but start with the basics and post some pics of your cooks.
    David
    BBQ since 2010 - Oh my, what I was missing.
  • I'm still fairly new to the BGE also, and have found that adding accessories as I learn is a big part of the fun of the BGE.  My Christmas list was a full-length apron, a Guru Golf Club 5 In 1 BBQ Tool - Flame Spreader from BBQ Guru, a light for the grill.  You don't have to have all of the accessories but it sure is fun to have them.
  • Got my large egg a month ago as well and love it. Platesetter is great, which mine came with. However, if I had the choice to buy the platesetter I would pass on it and get the adjustable rig from ceramic grill store or something similar to that. I find myself running out of room for larger cooks. The platesetter helps for indirect cooking but doesn't help add any grid space. Something to consider before buying plate setter. You are going to love the egg though, I have cooked so many different foods on it, unbelievable. 
    LBGE, Weber OTG w/ Rotisserie, Weber Genesis S-330, Chargriller Duo, AR-15, AK-47
  • joe@bgejoe@bge Posts: 394
    IMO - Placesetter is a must if you plan to smoke (low and slow), thermapen or the like for instant read temps, and I agree that if you plan to cook for more than 4 on a large (depending on the meat) - a grill extender either the egg one, or if you want to go fancy with the ceramic grillworks swing grate or woo grate are nice to have to give you extra room to grill everything at one time.  Depending on where you are going to have your egg, you might want to look into some sort of outdoor rubermaid type container to store all your toys.  I store my lump and all my accessories for two eggs in one outdoors - its very nice.  Welcome to the cult!  B-)

  • Get the nest unless you plan on getting a cart or making one. Also side shelves are a must on the nest. Also if you are going to smoke a lot tHe plate setter, BBQ guru, are a must! If you are going to put expensive cuts of meat on the EGG the guru will help with pit temp and meat temp.
  • I consider these a must to go along with your egg purchase:

    1.) Thermapen - you'll go from an average cook to a good cook with one of these.  Always cook everything to temperature, not time.
    2.) A way to cook indirect.  It's not an EGG without a way to cook indirect for low & slow, pizzas, baking, ect.
    I use the BGE plate setter but there are many 3rd party options out there as stated in above posts.

    There are many nice accessories to have but these are mandatory in my opinion.
    Packerland, Wisconsin

  • You'll love the Egg.

     

    -SMITTY     

    from SANTA CLARA, CA

  • MickeyMickey Posts: 13,455
    edited December 2011

    www.ceramicgrillstore.com call Tom. I have 3 eggs and the wrong items as I see now that I bought were platesetters for two and CI grills for two. Save that money, call Tom and get Spyders and pizza stones. Never thought I would agree with Tweev (maybe it is Santa Tweev now) but what he said 4 posts above this is correct. Also talk with Tom about the Adj Rig.

    Salado TX Egg Family: 2 Large and a very well used Mini.... 5th Salado EggFest is March 14, 2015

  • I'm pretty new at this Egg thing too. All the toys are cool, and a must have to get all the versatility out of the Egg. 
  • VolfoVolfo Posts: 31

    Lots of advice here.  It is a lot of fun and I have a little basic advice.

    1. There are lots of ways to start your lump burning, but if you have an electrical outlet near your egg and a short extension cord, then by far the easiest is a simple electric starter.  $10 bucks at home depot or lowes.  Well worth it.

    2.  The only thing you almost have to do before you cook is calibrate the thermometer.  I figured mine would be right and didn't do it at first.  Nothing was gcooking right.  Turns out my thermometer was off 100 plus degrees.  It only takes a few minutes and will save you lots of frsutration. 

    3.  There are lots of good and fun accessories.  If you are going to smoke, you need some sort of method of indirect cooking.  For most people, this means a platesetter.  Others in this post who are more experts than I are recommending the stuff from ceramic grill store.  I can't comment on which is better, but agree you need it to smoke.

    4.  I really love the pizza stone.  Highly recommend getting one if you want to do pizza.  Also highly recommend use of parchment paper to simplify things. 

    5.  It isn't a necessity to get started by any means but soon you will want to buy a remote thermometer of some sort for longer cooks so you can know when your bird or bbq is done without opening the top all the time. 

    So, (1) buy an electric starter; (2) calibrate your temp gauge; (3) consider a platesetter or other set up for indirect.  And then go from there. 

  • Calibrate your dome thermometer! Get a pot of water boiling, hard cook some eggs or pasta and dip the end of thermometer in the water, should come up to 212 degrees. If it is off take a wrench and adjust the dial by turning the nut. Wish I had done this sooner.
    Great tip! Just got an XL last week and didn't even think to do this. :)

  • 1. There are lots of ways to start your lump burning, but if you have an electrical outlet near your egg and a short extension cord, then by far the easiest is a simple electric starter. 

    This guy knows what he's talking about.  Best, cheapest and easiest way to start your lump.
    Packerland, Wisconsin

  • ok guys or gals this is what i decided on a ex large egg,nest,egg mate,handler,plate setter,ash tool,grill gripper,lump.what do u all think out of this list i need to add or take off? im going to do alot of low and slow. i have been cutting meat for 22 years so i can get my hands on all kinds of meat.ive been reading on this board for months and u guys are going to cas me to spend a bunch of money.with this list what should i be paying for this?what about a thermomter? do i need a digi q
  • Cook on the egg without a digi q type devise at 1st. It will help you learn how to dial in your egg. If you are getting a Xlarge, consider a lump reducer. When cooking area is smaller for some cooks, it will save you $ in the long run. Enjoy your new investment.
  • I just got my BGE for Christmas too and see a lot of recipes calling to use the cast iron gridl. Is there a big difference to the standard? Also, any problem using some Fatwood to start the lump coals?
  • IMO, don't use fatwood to start lump, you will get some nasty smoke and off flavor.  One of the easiest methods that I have used it to spray some olive oil on a paper towel and stick it in the lump.  Works great.  I got the Golf Club from BBQ Guru for Christmas so that is one my list of starters to try.

    The regular grid is fine for most cooking.  The only time I use the cast iron is when I want grill marks on steaks, hamburgers or anything else.  Othewise I use the stainless grill.
  • ok guys or gals this is what i decided on a ex large egg,nest,egg mate,handler,plate setter,ash tool,grill gripper,lump.what do u all think out of this list i need to add or take off? im going to do alot of low and slow. i have been cutting meat for 22 years so i can get my hands on all kinds of meat.ive been reading on this board for months and u guys are going to cas me to spend a bunch of money.with this list what should i be paying for this?what about a thermomter? do i need a digi q
    A good instant read thermometer (Thermapen) and a method to go indirect (plate setter or other 3rd party rig) are essential.  All other accessories are "nice to have" items.  My 2 cents.
    Packerland, Wisconsin

  • I basically bought the same setup, except in large, and added the multi-tier grate.  I added the handler as a last minute purchase, and I'm very happy I did.  It makes moving the beast very manageable.  DigiQ, not really needed, but a good thermometer is essential.  The Maverick ET-732 is a great addition.
    Large BGE - Small BGE - Traeger Lil' Tex Elite - Weber 22.5" One-Touch - Weber Smokey Joe
  • BakerManBakerMan Posts: 154

    Welcome scootq07.  Since you are new here, below are my pointers for regulating temperature.  It might seem a little complicated but eventually you settle on a method you are used to.  Good luck and have fun!

    The following is what I have observed as far as temperature control and has worked for me cooking wings, tenderloins, beer can chickens and pizzas.  The trick is to be consistent each time you build a fire and cook so you are not trying to control what "appears" to be random events.

    Temperature Control
    There are three factors that control how much heat your Egg produces and your ability to control it.


    • The amount of charcoal you light initially and total amount of charcoal in the grill.

    • The amount of intake air from the lower vent
    • The amount of air that can exit the upper vent

    For the purpose of my discussion I classify heat into three ranges

    Low - 200-300
    Medium - 300-500
    High - > 600

    Charcoal Lighting
    The more charcoal that lights initially the hotter your fire will be. If you light the fire and leave the the lid up until most/all the charcoal lights you will have a tremendous amount of heat that will be hard to regulate. Closing the grill at this point and trying to lower the temp to cook at low/medium will be tricky because so much charcoal is burning and producing heat. On the other hand, if you light the fire, wait until an amount of charcoal that will fit in your hand is lit and then close the top it will be easier to adjust the vents for low/medium cooking and maintain a constant temperature.

    Air Flow (upper/Lower)
    With the combination of lower and upper vents you can limit air flow to the point the coals go out or open the vents and get the grill going like a blacksmith's forge and every range in between. The trick is to not let the grill heat run away but instead plan ahead for the type of heat and duration you want. Also limit the number of variables each time you cook.

    Preparation
    Before lighting a fire I always stir the remaining charcoal in the firebox and knock all the ashes into the the lower reservoir. I also make sure all the vent holes are clear. Performing this step will insure consistent, predictable air flow each time you build a fire. Once the ash and air holes are clean I fill up the firebox with charcoal. I like to start with the same amount of charcoal (combination of new/used) each time I light the grill. Now you are ready to light the charcoal.

    I have found that using the guidelines below I can set a desired temp and maintain it for severals hours.

    Low Heat
    Light the charcoal and leave the top up until you have several pieces of charcoal lit that is about the size of your palm.

    Lower Vent - Open about 1/2 inch
    Multi-function Top - Slide top closed and open rotating vent so holes are unobstructed.
    Stay with grill and close lower vent as you approach your desired low temp. You can fine tune with rotating vent.

    Medium Heat
    Light the charcoal and leave the top up until you have several pieces of charcoal lit that is about the size of your palm.

    Lower Vent - Open about 1/2 to 1 inch
    Multi-function Top - Slide top halfway open and close rotating vent so holes are closed.
    Stay with grill and close lower vent as you approach tour desired low temp. You can fine tune by sliding the top open/closed.

    High Heat
    Light the charcoal and leave the top up until you have approximately 1/2 the charcoal lit.

    Lower Vent - Open about 1 inch to start
    Multi-function Top - Remove and set aside
    Stay with grill until temperature is stabilized. If you walk away before temps are stabilized the grill can easily hit 1000 degrees and "freak you out" as the gasket catches fire (been there, done that) Use lower vent to regulate temperature.

    Keep in mind these are guidelines. By insuring ash/ air vents are clear and using the same amount of charcoal each time you cook you have removed two potential areas that can cause inconsistent results. After you try this a few times you will start to get a feel for how the grill reacts and you will feel comfortable controlling the temps.

     

    Temperature Probes
    A wireless temperature probe is a must have. Once you get the hang of regulating your grill temp the wireless thermometer will allow you to relax and monitor the meat without having to constantly open grill (lose heat/smoke) to check the temperature. A lot of people on the forum like the Maverick ET 732 (see below). I already own the Oregon Scientific and it works great.

    Maverick ET732

    Oregon Scientific

    Hope this helps,

    BakerMan - Purcellville, VA
    "When its smokin' its cookin', when its black its done"
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