Big Green Egg - EGGhead Forum - The Ultimate Cooking Experience...
Welcome to the EGGhead Forum - a great place to visit and packed with tips and EGGspert advice! You can also join the conversation and get more information and amazing kamado recipes by following Big Green Egg at:

Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Instagram  |  Pinterest  |  Youtube  |  Vimeo
Share your photos by tagging us and using the hashtag #EGGhead4Life.


In Atlanta? Come visit Big Green Egg headquarters, including our retail showroom, the History of the EGG Museum and Culinary Center!  3786 DeKalb Technology Parkway, Atlanta, GA 30340.

Brining question

SlickSlick Posts: 382
edited 9:06AM in EggHead Forum
I always brine my pork chops, usually for a few hours. I just watched an episode of "Secrets of a Restaurant Chef" on Food Network and she brined her chops for three days! They cooked up nice and juicy, but does this much brining really make a difference? Might be time for an eggsperiment.

BTW, I'll bet that she is an Egger at heart, the way she loves BACON!

Slick

Comments

  • Celtic WolfCeltic Wolf Posts: 9,773
    Three DAYS in a brine is called CURING. What she cooked was HAM. A brine really should be done for 12 hours at least. Anything short of that is really a Marinate.

    Personally I'd rather just marinate them if I HAD too.
  • thirdeyethirdeye Posts: 7,428
    DSC03400a.jpg

    I flavor brine all my pork chops too, from one hour to three. At three days however, you would be curing them. Which is not a bad thing if you want to slow smoke them. In fact they are a real treat.

    DSC05026C.jpg

    Instead of a liquid brine I just buckboard them for 48 hours, soak, rest and smoke. These are about 1/3 the price of smoked chops from the meat case, and I think much better.
    Happy Trails
    ~thirdeye~

    Barbecue is not rocket surgery
  • thirdeyethirdeye Posts: 7,428
    Pete,

    Flavor brining can actually be quite short.....From a few minutes on shrimp to an hour or so on chicken breasts or an hour or longer on chops, to a day or two for a turkey breast.

    I've always thought of a marinade as having an acid base, vinegar for example.
    Happy Trails
    ~thirdeye~

    Barbecue is not rocket surgery
Sign In or Register to comment.
Click here for Forum Use Guidelines.