Big Green Egg - EGGhead Forum - The Ultimate Cooking Experience...
Welcome to the EGGhead Forum - a great place to visit and packed with tips and EGGspert advice! You can also join the conversation and get more information and amazing kamado recipes by following Big Green Egg at:

Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Instagram  |  Pinterest  |  Youtube  |  Vimeo
Share your photos by tagging us and using the hashtag #EGGhead4Life.


In Atlanta? Come visit Big Green Egg headquarters, including our retail showroom, the History of the EGG Museum and Culinary Center!  3786 DeKalb Technology Parkway, Atlanta, GA 30340.

Shad

GretlGretl Posts: 670
edited 3:40PM in EggHead Forum
On one of the Food Channel shows (maybe Cooking Live) this weekend, I saw fresh shad being prepared by baking it in foil. Has anyone prepared fresh shad in the Egg? It's so seasonal, I guess now's the time to try it.
Cheers,
Gretl

Comments

  • GrumpaGrumpa Posts: 861
    Gretl,[p]Oh man, I think I'd rather fix squid and everyone here knows how I feel about "squid". Shad runs in schools in the local lakes and we catch them for bait to fish for bass.[p]I would not have any idea on how to prepare them in the egg or any other way but, I'll put you on hold until NatureBoy returns, he can cook 'bout anything :~)

  • Char-WoodyChar-Woody Posts: 2,642
    Gretl, They are rough fish in our lakes and reservoirs. We toss em back usually..Not much on em but scalem, fin and bone. If you find a winner, let us know. I might save a few this year.
    C~W[p]

  • Nature BoyNature Boy Posts: 8,436
    Gretl,
    I got this great book on cooking fish a few weeks ago. Shad are VERY bony. True shad filets without bones are hard to come by (depending on the experience of your fish monger). It is an oily fish. If you have a whole fish, long baking theoretically softens the bones to the point you can eat them. But it tends to dry out. Maybe not in the egg??[p]So, sounds like whole fish lower temps (maybe), and true filets without bones can be broiled or grilled. They list substitute fish as bluefish, mackerel, rockfish, red snapper, bluefish.[p]Hope that helps. Let us know what you do.
    NB

    DizzyPigBBQ.com
    Twitter: @dizzypigbbq
    Facebook: Dizzy Pig Seasonings
  • Nature BoyNature Boy Posts: 8,436
    Gretl,
    I also see the book lists Salmon, another oily fish, as a substitute. In fact, they list one of the common names as "poor man's salmon"! Says if the fish monger will let you, run your finger up the flesh to see if they got all the bones....often they don't.[p]Here is a quote from the book "Fish: The Complete Guide to Buying and Cooking":[p] "If you can buy shad filets--real filets, that is, with all of the bones removed, not just some, as seems to happen these days---do so. It's a delicious fish.[p]Keep us posted. Don't forget to remove the hooks.[p]NB

    DizzyPigBBQ.com
    Twitter: @dizzypigbbq
    Facebook: Dizzy Pig Seasonings
  • TeslamaniaTeslamania Posts: 144
    Gretl,[p]I LOVE shad. I grew up eating the whole fish but now I get the "boned" or semi-boneless filets. As you know it is a tasty fish. The recipe that I use on the stove involves frying the fish in a bit of oil to brown the skin, and then adding a bit of soy sauce, and cooking sherry. That plus a buch of spring onions and mushrooms, a bit of ground fresh ginger, and a pinch of sugar. Simmer it a bit and you have one tasty fish. I bet it could be adapted for the egg by cooking it in a cast iron thing.

  • GretlGretl Posts: 670
    Teslamania,
    I'm DYIN' here, that sounds so good! I'll just quit my job right now and run to the store....
    (sound of a sharp slap)
    Thanks. I needed that.[p]Seriously, that sounds like a winner and ready for an Egg adaptaion. [p]Cheers,
    Gretl

  • TeslamaniaTeslamania Posts: 144
    Gretl,[p]If you don't try it on the Egg, you gotta try it on the stove. I will have to see if I can find me some cast iron. Thanks for reminding me that it is Shad season.

  • Nature BoyNature Boy Posts: 8,436
    Teslamania,
    Bed Bath and Beyond, Linens and Things, and even True Value hardware sells cast iron pans. Cheap. Forget the internet, as shipping costs will be nasty. You will not turn back once you have cooked on a well seasoned CI pan. On the stove or on the egg, they are perfect. And easy to season on the egg.[p]BTW, when you cooked that whole shad, did you just pick around the bones?? Were the bones troublesome?? The book I have makes it sound like they are chocked full of bones.[p]Seeya
    NB

    DizzyPigBBQ.com
    Twitter: @dizzypigbbq
    Facebook: Dizzy Pig Seasonings
  • TeslamaniaTeslamania Posts: 144
    Nature Boy,
    My parent's would and still do cook the whole fish. There are a lot of bones. I find that if you can find the boneless filets they are better (fewer bones). Try Fresh Fields. Thanks for the tip about the cast iron.

Sign In or Register to comment.
Click here for Forum Use Guidelines.