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How do you cook Chicken Breast?

FrancoFranco Posts: 88
edited 12:12AM in EggHead Forum
Tried them the other day and they were great. Left them in Italian Dressing, Soy and basic seasonings for 6 hours.[p]What are some other ways and temps to cook these tender things?[p]Thanks, Frank
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Comments

  • Franco,
    If you like that marinade, you'll love this. Get the Good Seasons Italian Salad Dressing kit (cruet and dry mix). Use balsamic vinegar and olive oil when you mix it up and marinate at least 2 hours, great on steaks and portabella mushrooms too. Like teriyaki? Try a cup of soy sauce, 1/2 cup pineapple juice, 2 tbs brown sugar, 2 tbs fresh crushed garlic and 1 tbs minced fresh ginger (can substitute pickled ginger chopped fine). Mix that up and marinate overnight.

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  • BlueSmokeBlueSmoke Posts: 1,678
    Franco, I like to flatten them slightly and marinate in straight Yoshida Original. Run the temp to 500º, grill 6 to 7 mins per side.
    What I haven't done yet, but will very shortly, is to flatten them to 1/4 to 3/8 inch, dip in a mixture of egg and cornstarch, and fry on a lightly greased griddle. (Saw this on an oriental cooking show awhile back, and I've been dying to try it since.)

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  • sdbeltsdbelt Posts: 267
    Franco, I like to use breasts that are still on the bone and have skin. The bones give me a layer of protection from flair ups. I cook direct between 275 and 325, bone side down for the majority of the cook, but I do flip 'em about 2/3rds the way done, for about 1/6th of the time.[p]I've used JJ's rub on 'em, done 'em plain, and done 'em with a BBQ sauce mop. All varieties are good, just depends on my mood.[p]My last batch was plain and my wife couldn't believe how I had arrived at this perfect golden brown color. To be honest, I astonished myself. And the taste![p]Good eating,[p]--sdb
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  • CornfedCornfed Posts: 1,324
    Citizen Q,[p]Nice cooking contribution, Lord Humongous.[p]Cornfed
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  • Franco,
    I assume you mean boneless skinless. I do em at 450* direct for about 5-6 minutes a side. Usually mop with our favorite sauce. For chicken we like a sweet honey maple sauce.
    B D

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  • GretlGretl Posts: 670
    Franco,
    One of the last Cooks Illustrated magazines (maybe July issue?) had a whole thing about grilling boneless, skinless chicken breasts. The recommendation is to pound the breasts so they're equal thickness and brine them in a simple sugar/salt water solution for a while. Cook them over medium coals for only a few minutes per side. I did this the last time I had some of those naked guys to cook, and the result was far better than I've had in the past. For a finishing sauce, I used some garlic/ginger Indian stuff that comes in a jar (don't remember the brand) and added some melted butter, curry, hot sauce, mustard, brown sugar, and of course...bourbon, my favorite addition to just about everything, including the cook. Anyway, I got the temp about 350, oiled the breasts with some olive oil, sprinkled a little salt and pepper, and let them cook for a few minutes, just long enough for grill marks. You gotta work fast. I flipped them over, another minute or so, and I brushed on the sauce and turned them once more. I had heated up the remaining sauce, which I served with the grilled breasts and some basmati rice. We agreed that this was by far the juiciest we've ever had. It's hard with the boneless and skinless cuts because the meat can dry out very quickly. Don't overcook is the secret, in addition to the brining and the even thickness.
    Good luck,
    Gretl

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