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raised rack & orange wood

RandmanRandman Posts: 31
edited November -1 in EggHead Forum
I am cooking a herb-brined turkey breast tonight on a raised rack. Main grid, then pizza stone, then two bricks on edge with drip pan between them, then smaller rack with breast directly on it. I am using orange wood ( pellet form ) for a light smoke and am trying a lower temp of 250*, hoping the extra moisture will keep the breast from drying out at the lower heat. Anyone used orange wood? I don't really know what to expect. Guess I'll find out.

Comments

  • CatCat Posts: 556
    randman,[p]I tried the orange pellets. Are these the ones you put in a foil pouch? They don't last very long, but the flavor is nice - and a light smoke sounds like what you want.[p]I find there's less risk of drying out a turkey breast at a cooking temp of 300-350 than at lower temps. But brining really helps, whatever temp you use.[p]Cathy
  • randman,
    Where are you located? I'm sure the orange wood they are selling is "osage orange" or hedge as we call it out here. It is an excellent source of smoke, as long as you don't over do it. Give me an e-mail, and I'll see how practical it is to get you some of the real stuff![p]Dr. C

  • Char-WoodyChar-Woody Posts: 2,642
    Dr. Chicken, [p]I wonder about the use of Osage Orange or Hedgeapple being used as a smoking wood. If its real orange tree wood I have heard its fine for smoke. [p]From my aquaintance with Osage Orange it derived its name from the Osage Indians who used it to make some of the most excellent bows for hunting and tribal protection.

    But it is also a very toxic wood, and not recommended for use in wooden objects used in food preparation. One can get sick from food that has been in contact with the wood. [p]I have recommended in the past to avoid Osage Orange or Hedgeapple for that very reason as the smoke could carry that toxicity as well to be injested via breathing or contaminate the food in the cooker. [p]I could very well be mistaken in using it as a smoking wood but feel I should comment on it till further informantion develop's. If I am mistaken go ahead and dump on me..I can learn a thing or two yet..:-)[p]Cheers..C~W[p]

  • Nature BoyNature Boy Posts: 8,282
    Char-Woody,
    If they were "smoking pellets" specifically made for cooking, I would expect it aint from the poison woods you speak of. [p]Real Orange wood sounds like another thing to try!

    DizzyPigBBQ.com
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  • Nature BoyNature Boy Posts: 8,282
    randman,
    I echo Cat. Breasts are lean, and benefit from higher temps. They absorb quite a bit of smoke, so you don't really need the extra time. White meat has a very small window between done and dry. Polder would help. 165 internal should give you moist and done results. Keep us posted.
    NB

    DizzyPigBBQ.com
    Twitter: @dizzypigbbq
    Facebook: Dizzy Pig Seasonings
  • Char-WoodyChar-Woody Posts: 2,642
    Nature Boy, I have heard variations of using orange wood and its been highly touted in the past. I haven't had the experience with it yet. But I hate to see people in agony from reactions to toxic materials untill its proven otherwise. [p]The Osage Orange is also a very orangish in appearance and very dense and extremely hard..It was imported from the southern states to Iowa for use in fence post materials. Why, I will never know as you could hardly put a nail or staple in it. [p]There are posts still in the ground that have deteriorated very little over 100 years of use. Its a very heavy wood to hold in your hand, and also a very good wood for carving figurines and objects. I have had it here for that purpose. But the natural beauty of the wood soon turns to a greyish orange after a period of time and exposure to sunlight.[p]Cheers..C~W[p]
  • RandmanRandman Posts: 31
    Cat, Yes, these are pellets you put in a foil pouch, although I have used pellets straight on the glowing lump with satisfactory results. I bought some oak, black walnut, sassafras, orange, pecan, and hickory pellets to try out. I usually cook my breasts at 350*, but I thought I would experiment with the lower temps with the brined breast. I just checked my fire and I had dropped to 195* so I brought it back up to 250*. If it is no good, I have two big dogs who will make short work of my dinner.

  • Char-Woody,
    I am under the general assumption that it is osage orange. When I first started cooking hogs for gatherings, the old(er) man that clued me in said hedge, locust and hackleberry were some of the finest smokin' woods I could use. I've used hedge and hackleberry numerous times without any problems that I know of. I know of no times my family ever got sick from it, and if I've been doing something that's a no-no I'd sure like to know for sure. I'm by no means an expert in the use of woods (see my post about using black walnut earlier this month) so I am at the mercy of someone who would know for sure. I value your input, believe me C~W. Like I said, if there's something I don't know about it, I'm all ears. [p]Dr. C

  • Char-WoodyChar-Woody Posts: 2,642
    Dr. Chicken,[p] The proof is in the pudding and if you've used this for prior cooks and smokes with no ill affects, the thats pretty official. I just didn't like the toxicity reports on the wood so tossed in the cautions on it. I have read of smoked turkey and reference to this wood at one time but it wasn't conclusive to be Osage Orange that he used. For the wood itself, like Mesquite, the best resource for it the stuff is to burn it..:-) Just don't get sick!! We want ya around here in good spirits..!
    Cheers..C~W[p]

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