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spice mill like a pepper mill?

edited November -1 in EggHead Forum
Last night while grinding some juniper berries so as to try Cat's new salmon recipe tonight I got into a real mess using a small coffee grinder. That took 20 minutes and produced a mess and a tired arm! I reloaded that output into a pepper grinder thinking it would refine the results. Texture was such that just created more mess and more stuff to disassemble and clean. Ultimately (way too far into happy hour) I resorted to my trusty mortar and pestle. Will someone enlighten me as for what kind of grinder I should buy which will take care of these do-it-yourself tasks, clean up easily and get me back on schedule for happy hour? Thanks. ^oo^~

Comments

  • Nature BoyNature Boy Posts: 8,244
    one feral kat,
    Mortar and pestals are trusty like you mentioned. We have a mini food processor I use for large batches of rubs. When I make single portions, I always use my trusty mortar/pestal. It really does a nice job, and I think does something special by pressing the spices together with each other while you work out your frustrations with a heavy pounding motion.[p]IMO sometimes the old manual way is best.[p]NB

    DizzyPigBBQ.com
    Twitter: @dizzypigbbq
    Facebook: Dizzy Pig Seasonings
  • Nature Boy,
    Another method is to use an old coffee bean grinder. I'm talking the electric kind not the manual type. I have an old one that I use all the time to grind peppercorns, coriander seeds, juniper berries, sea salt, Bay leaves etc. works great. Of coarse this grinder is never used for coffee again. Works for me.[p]Grillin Bill

  • CatCat Posts: 556
    one feral kat,[p]Sorry the recipe cut into happy hour! The juniper berries I get are pretty dried out, & I store them in the freezer; they went straight from there to the coffee grinder & turned into powder in a few seconds.[p]I agree with NB. A mortar & pestle is best for softer stuff.[p]Hope this experience won't discourage you from trying the salmon. One caveat: the rub is a bit salty, and I sprinkled it on a little too heavily in places. Taste it first so you can decide how much to use. [p]Cathy
  • Mike OelrichMike Oelrich Posts: 544
    Howdy Nature Boy,[p] This thing (or one of its big brothers) is high on my list of kitchen toys to get someday:[p]http://www.sumeet.net/multigrindchut.html[p] However, since I signed up for a dive trip in December, my underwater photography toy list has taken precedence again. So many toys, so little time . . .[p]MikeO
    [ul][li]Sumeet Multigrind[/ul]
  • Nature BoyNature Boy Posts: 8,244
    Grillin Bill,
    I have done it a few times in mine and it works fairly well. Mine is just a basic model where you adjust the grind by how long you grind the stuff. Problem I have is that some of the stuff is reduced to powder and some end up in big chunks. [p]I do use it a bunch for corriander seeds for small batches of fish rub.[p]Thanks
    NB

    DizzyPigBBQ.com
    Twitter: @dizzypigbbq
    Facebook: Dizzy Pig Seasonings
  • Nature BoyNature Boy Posts: 8,244
    Wassup Mike,
    Looks pretty cool! I don't even want to see the price....but like you, it will be a while for that one. [p]I still need to get several gadgets to be anywhere near being in your league!![p]Cheers!
    NB

    DizzyPigBBQ.com
    Twitter: @dizzypigbbq
    Facebook: Dizzy Pig Seasonings
  • JimWJimW Posts: 450
    Nature Boy,
    The electric coffee grinder works great. To get rid of the big chunks, you can shake the grinder while it's doing its thing. That works like a charm. Also I use a piece of kind of dry bread to clean it up. Just put it in the grinder and pulse it a few times.
    JimW

  • Nature BoyNature Boy Posts: 8,244
    JimW,
    Great tip on the bread and the shaking. Do purshiate!
    NB

    DizzyPigBBQ.com
    Twitter: @dizzypigbbq
    Facebook: Dizzy Pig Seasonings
  • Cat, oh that didn't hold me back from trying your recipe and I rubbed a beautiful slab of salmon first thing this morning so as to go the 12 hour distance! Have the adler ready and will fire up humpty later this eve. Your idea about freezing those make sense and that surely would have solved the gooey problem I encountered. As for too much salt, well, that's too late as I followed your directions to the T. Let you know tomorrow! ^oo^~

  • CatCat Posts: 556
    one feral kat,[p]The salt didn't affect the interior very much (although I only fridged it for 4 hours). The excess was only in a few spots on the outside, mostly on the edges, & it was easily scraped off after cooking.[p]Cathy
  • SundownSundown Posts: 2,842
    Grillin Bill,
    I've been using a small bean grinder and one day whilst I was cussin' and funin' cleaning it my daughter suggested I toss in a piece of bread to clena it...duh!
    The crusty breads work best
    When the teacher becomes the student[p]Carey

  • BDBD Posts: 87
    MikeO,[p]it has a strange egg-like quality to it. I like the sound of it ! Toys, gotta love 'em ![p]
  • KennyGKennyG Posts: 949
    MikeO,[p]Thanks for the link on this one!! This is exactly what I've been looking for and I can justify it to the wife since we need a new coffee grinder anyway hehehe[p]K~G

  • Cat, well, going the full 12 hours probably was a bad idea. I'm sure it was the 2 T of kosher salt that did it, but when I unwrapped the salmon it was sitting in pools of water obviously drawn out of the fish. It tasted fine, but was a bit too dry for our tastes. The juniper berries have a unique favor and sort of "outdooresy" to coin a term! I'll do the recipe again though this time I'll go for just 4 hours. Thanks for your help! ^oo^~

  • RhumAndJerkRhumAndJerk Posts: 1,506
    Nature Boy,
    I definitely agree with you and Cat that it is hard to beat the manual method. About a month ago I purchased an electric coffee grinder, which I have yet to take out of the box. I normally use the standard white marble mortar and pestle, but for bigger jobs I use a Molcajete. [p]A Molecajete is a Mayan Lava rock Mortar and Pestle. From what I have heard it is the only proper tool to use to make Guacamole. It is also hard enough to grind dry rice. [p]By the way, I pulled out the mortar and pestle last night and built a not-so-ordinary curry paste. When the recipe is complete, I will post it.[p]Happy Grinding,
    RhumAndJerk[p]

    [ul][li]A Molcajete Mortar and Pestle[/ul]
  • KennyGKennyG Posts: 949
    RhumAndJerk,[p]On my recent vaca to New Mexico, we found a great little Mexican restaurant whose specialty of the house was fresh guacamole prepared at your table. They used a molecajete and it sure does make a difference.[p]K~G

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